This Newsletter is Sponsored by MyHeritage

MyHeritage

Donny Osmond Joins RootsTech 2015

One of the biggest names in entertainment from one of the most well-known families in the world will be part of the largest family history conference in the world. RootsTech 2015 announced today that entertainer, actor, author, and television host Donny Osmond will be joining RootsTech as a keynote speaker on Saturday, February 14, 2015. He will inspire the thousands of conference attendees to discover and share family stories of the past, present, and future.

Ancestry.com LLC Reports Third Quarter 2014 Financial Results

Ancestry.com LLC today reported financial results today for the third quarter ended September 30, 2014. It was obviously a good year for the company: Q3 Non-GAAP Revenues were $154.7 Million, Up 8.3% Year-Over-Year,

“Ancestry.com is executing well on our mission to help everyone discover, preserve and share their family history,” said Tim Sullivan, Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry.com. “We’re continuing to focus on our core customers – the enthusiasts who are passionate about their family history – by adding valuable new content and features to our site, while also aggressively pursuing growth priorities designed to expand our total addressable market. These priorities include our AncestryDNA product, where we’ve doubled our customer base during 2014, our mobile apps, which are generating increased engagement, and our efforts to broaden category awareness, including the creation of terrific family history TV programming. Overall our business is healthy and we believe we’re positioning the company to capture its long-term growth opportunities.”

You can read the full report at http://goo.gl/Wpo5Md.

Connecticut State Library Seeks To Digitize World War I History and You Can Help

For those who lived through it, on the battlefield or the home front, World War I was a life-defining event, and the Connecticut State Library wants to assure that family-held memories and mementos will be preserved and available to historians, students, genealogists or the simply curious. Beginning later this month, state library officials will hold a series of community events at which local residents are urged to bring in family letters, photographs, diaries, recorded stories and other objects from the World War I period.

Pipe Burst Destroys Books

Many genealogists, archivists, public officials often think the best way to save records for many years is to print the information on paper. However, paper is one of the most fragile storage methods available, as demonstrated recently in Watertown, NY.

Some 300 books were destroyed when a pipe burst in the basement of the Roswell P. Flower Memorial Library. A pipe from the heating and air conditioning system burst late in the afternoon, causing as much as three inches of water to end up on the floor. Fortunately, a couple of building maintenance workers were nearby when the pipe burst and acted quickly to control the leak. Had the leak occurred when the building was unoccupied, the damage could have been far worse.

(+) How To Self Publish Your Own Printed Book or eBook

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Many genealogists dream of publishing the results of their research efforts. Whether it is to be a collection of childhood memories of time spent with grandparents or a scholarly study of all the descendants of a family’s immigrant ancestor, publishing books is still the best way to distribute information amongst relatives as well as to preserve the information for future generations.

Publishing most genealogy books has always been done by the use of “vanity press” publishers. A vanity press, vanity publisher, or subsidy publisher is a publishing house in which authors pay to have their books published. Unlike mainstream publishers, a “vanity press” publisher requires the author to pay in advance to have the book published. The price usually includes publishing some predetermined number of books. In many cases, the author takes immediate delivery of all the books, stores them, and then sells the individual books as best he or she can. The vanity press publisher may or may not also make the books available for ordering in the company’s catalog.

23andMe and MyHeritage Announce Strategic Collaboration and Product Integration

The following announcement indicates a major partnership that will provide major enhancements to the services of both companies. 23andMe’s customers will be able to enjoy automated family history discoveries by using MyHeritage’s Smart Matching™ Record Matching services. MyHeritage customers will now be able to use matching DNA to explore their family tree connections.

You might want to watch the video below and then read the written announcement from MyHeritage (the sponsor of this newsletter) and 23andMe:

If your web browser does not display the video player above, you can also watch it at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1MefhlGTA8.

The following was written by MyHeritage and 23andMe:

Genealogy Gems Launches Free Genealogy Book Club

The following announcement was written by Lisa Louise Cooke:

October 21, 2014

Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems is pleased to announce the launch of the FREE Genealogy Gems Book Club, which features great reads for genealogy lovers.

“This is an idea we’ve been percolating on for quite a while,” says Gems owner-producer Lisa Louise Cooke. “People are always sending me the names of books they love. I also hear from publishers and the authors themselves. We thought it would be great to share these books more widely.”

National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair

Participate in the National Archives and Records Administration’s biggest genealogy event of the year! During the three days of Internet broadcasting, learn and ask questions about Federal records as resources for family history research. Speakers include genealogy experts from National Archives facilities across the nation and from U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services. From beginner to expert, discover new tips and tricks—we have sessions for all skill levels. After the event, recorded sessions and handouts will remain online. Learn more at http://www.archives.gov/calendar/genealogy-fair.

October 28, 29, & 30, starting daily at 10 a.m. EDT

NOAA Team Discovers Two Vessels from WW-II Convoy Battle off North Carolina

A bit more of history has been uncovered: German U-boat 576 and freighter Bluefields were found within 240 yards of each other, approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. The following was written by the NOAA Monitor National Marine Sanctuary:

October 21, 2014

A team of researchers led by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant vessels from World War II’s Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.

“This is not just the discovery of a single shipwreck,” said Joe Hoyt, a NOAA sanctuary scientist and chief scientist for the expedition. “We have discovered an important battle site that is part of the Battle of the Atlantic. These two ships rest only a few hundred yards apart and together help us interpret and share their forgotten stories.”

German U-Boat German U-576. Click on the image to view a larger version.

The German U-576 departs Saint-Nazaire, France, on the Atlantic coast, circa 1940-1942. The submarine was sunk in 1942 by aircraft fire after attacking and sinking the Nicaraguan freighter Bluefields and two other ships off North Carolina.

Have You Talked with a Streetlight Recently?

Verizon knows something about technology. The company also spends a lot of time and effort studying future needs of the country. After all, Verizon needs to always be prepared for the future. Now the company is planning to build new or to modify existing streetlights to become serve as emergency call stations for endangered pedestrians. Press a button on the streetlight and be instantly connected to the closest 911 operator.

The same streetlights also could have signs attached that would communicate with traffic control centers via wireless networking and display traffic information and suggest alternate routes. A streetlight-mounted sign also could display up-to-the-minute information, such as the predicted arrival time of the next bus or subway train, as well as weather alerts. The same lights could display advertising or play music.

Update: Was Jack the Ripper REALLY Identified through DNA? No!

On September 8, 2014, I published an article at http://goo.gl/qiOXlb about recent claims that Jack the Ripper had finally been identified by the use of DNA. I thought the “evidence” was much too flimsy to be believed. Now a group of scientists has published a report that agrees: the identity of notorious killer is still a mystery 126 years after string of murders.

Scientists have said evidence which claimed to have unmasked Jack the Ripper is wrong because a decimal point may have been put in the wrong place during calculations to match the killer’s DNA with his descendants. In fact, they say, the sequence he found could be shared by the majority of the population and therefore cannot be matched to Kosminski – one of the suspects in the string of murders which took place on London’s streets more than 100 years ago – or the Ripper’s victim.

New Fellows of the American Society of Genealogists and 2014 Winners of Jacobus Award and ASG Scholar Award

The following announcement was written by the folks at the American Society of Genealogists:

The Fellows of the American Society of Genealogists held their annual meeting on Saturday, October 11, 2014, in Salt Lake City. Michael F. Dwyer of Pittsford, Vt., and Barbara Jean Mathews, CG, of Lexington, Mass., were elected to the Society as its 162nd and 163rd members, respectively.

Michael F. Dwyer has published articles in all of the major New England scholarly genealogical journals over the past twenty-five years. His expertise spans numerous ethnic groups, including New England Yankee, the immigrant Irish, French-Canadian, and French; his many articles have treated families in Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and French Canada. He currently is the head of the English Department and an English and Social Studies teacher at Otter Valley Union High School in Rutland, Vt. In 2004 he was named Vermont Teacher of the Year.

Barbara Jean Mathews, CG, has published four books and numerous genealogical articles. Over the years she has actively promoted scholarly genealogy, both as a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and through lectures and articles in other venues. She is currently the Verifying Genealogist of the Massachusetts Chapter of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. If your email provider blocked it, don’t forget that the latest Plus Edition newsletter is ALWAYS available at: http://www.eogn.com/wp/thisweek.htm. Your email provider cannot block that address so the newsletter is always available to you.

Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Update: Free or Nearly Free Cell Phone and Wi-Fi Telephone Calls
(+) Which Protects Better: Cloud Storage or Local Backups?
Dropbox Has Deleted a Bunch of User Files From the Cloud
Turn Your Cell Phone into a Portable Scanner
Barry Fleig Builds an Online Database of Burials in Cook County Cemetery in Dunning, Chicago, Illinois
Book Review: A Genealogist’s Guide to Discovering Your African-American Ancestors
County Employee Charged with Theft from Cape May County (New Jersey) Historical and Genealogical Society
CNN’s Upcoming “Roots: Our Journeys Home”

(+) Which Protects Better: Cloud Storage or Local Backups?

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

I have written often about the need to make frequent backups in order to protect your valuable information. After reading a message from a newsletter reader, I decided to write one more article about the topic to clear up one possible misconception.

The email message asked:

“You tell us to back up our data often, to many places, in case of physical disaster. But what happens if you get a virus that infects your computer, in spite of having virus protection. Do all the copies then have the virus also? What is the solution for that?”

First, let’s define some terminology. A file copy program is not a true backup program.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

United Kingdom, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, and South Carolina

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

Barry Fleig Builds an Online Database of Burials in Cook County Cemetery in Dunning, Chicago, Illinois

With over 38,000 burials spanning some seventy years, the Cook County Cemetery in Dunning, Chicago, Illinois, was a potters field serving the poor and indigent of the county. Those buried in the cemetery included deceased individuals from the County Poor house and farm opened 1854, the Insane Asylum opened 1869, the infirmary opened 1882, and the Consumptive hospital (TB), opened 1899. The cemetery received bodies from the Cook County Hospital, the city morgue, many Chicago area hospitals, and many city social institutions. About 120 bodies from the Great Chicago Fire in October 1871 were buried at the Cook County Cemetery in Dunning.

Records of those interred in the cemetery have been difficult to access. The vast majority of the records of who was buried at Dunning were destroyed in the 1960s when a storage room was flooded. Some records do remain but have not been conveniently available to the public. Barry Fleig, the former cemetery chairman of the Chicago Genealogical Society saw a need. He wanted to preserve the remaining records electronically before another disaster destroys the remaining fragile paper records.

Genealogical Societies and Global Family Reunion Join Forces for the Largest Family Reunion in History

The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies and by the Global Family Reunion:

FGS Marshals Its Hundreds of Member Societies to Help Global Family Reunion Fight Alzheimer’s

October 17, 2014 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and the Global Family Reunion announced today their partnership for the largest family reunion in history to be held June 6, 2015 on the site of the legendary 1964 New York’s World Fair to benefit Alzheimer’s research, education, and training.

FGS will facilitate the organization of Global Family Reunion branch parties at many of its member societies across the United States and around the world.

Buy Your Very Own Connecticut Village

Do you have ancestors who lived in Johnsonville, Connecticut? If so, you might want to commemorate their lives by purchasing the entire village. Of course, you don’t have to have ancestral connections. Anyone may now purchase the abandoned village for “only” $800,000. If you know anything about Connecticut real estate prices, you might agree that is a bargain. Of course, it is a “fixer upper.” The property has been deserted for years.

Part of East Haddam, Conn., Johnsonville—120 miles southwest of Boston, 30 minutes from Hartford—was once home to the bustling Neptune mill (destroyed in 1972 by a lightning strike), which harnessed power from the Moodus River for twine production. In the 1960s, the village inhabitants left the area. Today, it is an abandoned 19th century village with eight structures of historic significance, including including a general store, carriage house, and the mansion of village namesake Emory Johnsonn.

The U.S. Navy’s Oldest Ship is Being Restored

One of my favorite tourist attractions in Boston is Old Ironsides, drawing more than 500,000 visitors a year. Officially named the USS Constitution, the world’s oldest commissioned warship still afloat is a major attraction to anyone visiting Boston and for very good reasons. It gives visitors a great insight into the history of the United States and the hardships faced by the brave men who served on board. However, it will no longer be at the Navy Yard pier in Charlestown for a few years.

Built in Boston and launched in October 1797, the USS Constitution was among the first warships of the new nation. It was commissioned by the U.S. Navy following the Revolutionary War in order to protect American merchant ships off the northern coast of Africa. The three-mast frigate earned its nickname after winning battles during the War of 1812 against Great Britain.

Tine has taken its toll (again) and the USS Constitution was towed across Boston Harbor Friday to a drydock where it will undergo repairs. It is expected to be back in the water by 2017.

Find A Grave Adds a New Upload and Transcribe Beta

The folks at Find A Grave have just launched a new Upload and Transcribe beta at Find A Grave. With this new feature, you can upload a whole trip’s worth of cemetery headstone photos and transcribe them in either new memorials, or attach the photos easily to existing memorials. The new software allows users to upload multiple photos at once, easily transcribe uploaded photos, get help, help others, and to provide feedback.

Details may be found in the Ancestry.com Blog at: http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/17/new-find-a-grave-upload-and-transcribe-beta-available.

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