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Will Ancestry.com Add Family Health Info to Autosomal DNA Genetic Genealogy Service?

An article in the BioArray News, written by Justin Petrone, speculates that Ancestry.com may expand its genetic genealogy services to include family health-related information. A company spokesperson confirmed that the firm is in the “early stages of exploring family health history as a part of our company’s offering,” but declined to further elaborate.

You can read Justin Petrone’s article at http://goo.gl/baIkLy. (You will have to create a user name and password before you can read the article.)

Delaware Becomes First State to Give Heirs Broad Digital Assets Access

What happens to your email, Facebook, Twitter, blog, and other accounts when you die? Delaware has now passed a law that ensures families’ rights to access the digital assets of loved ones during incapacitation or after death. House Bill (HB) 345, “Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets and Digital Accounts Act,” gives heirs and executors the same authority to take legal control of a digital account or device, just as they would take control of a physical asset or document.

While some states, including Idaho and Nevada, have some existing provisions pertaining to limited digital assets for heirs, they are not as broad as the new Delaware law. For now, the state’s version of UFADAA only applies to residents of Delaware.

Kelsey Grammer to be Guest Celebrity on This Week’s U.S. Version of Who Do You Think You Are?

Kelsey Grammer will take a trip into the past to explore his grandmother’s family. In this week’s Who Do You Think You Are? Grammer uncovers the story of a woman haunted by demons, and finds a connection to family who risked everything in one of the greatest migrations in American history.

The episode will be broadcast tomorrow night, August 20 at 9/8c. Check your local television listings for the channel and time in your location. The episode will be available soon after on iTunes and later still on other Internet television sites.

In addition to this season’s new premieres, TLC has also acquired episodes from previous seasons of the series, marking their first debut on cable. Tomorrow night will feature encores of Reba McEntire’s episode at 8/9c, and Vanessa Williams’ episode at 10/9c.

Next week Minnie Driver’s episode will air as the season finale on August 27. Next week’s encore episodes will include Tim McGraw and Rita Wilson.

Ancestry.com to Transfer the MyCanvas Service to a New Home

This past June, Ancestry.com announced that the company was retiring the MyCanvas website and service in September 2014. Details may be found in my earlier article at http://wp.me/p5Z3-lk. Now the company has made arrangements to transfer the MyCanvas content to another company. The following was written by Eric Shoup, Senior Vice President of Product at Ancestry.com:

We’ve heard from many people who love MyCanvas and hate the idea of it going away. Well, we have some good news for you: It’s not going away after all! We were successful in finding a new home for the service at Alexander’s.

AncestryMyCanvasBook
Founded 35 years ago, Alexander’s is a Utah-based printing production company that has been the long-term printer of MyCanvas products including its genealogy books, calendars, and other printed products. This makes the transition of MyCanvas to Alexander’s a natural fit.

More Hertfordshire Council Records added to Deceased Online

The following announcement was written by Deceased Online:

Welwyn Hatfield is latest Hertfordshire council to place records on Deceased Online All burial records for Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council (WelHat) in Hertfordshire have been digitized and added to the specialist family history website www.deceasedonline.com.

Click on the above image to view a larger version

The Council covers the areas of Welwyn Garden City and Hatfield in the centre of Hertfordshire within the East of England Region to the north of London. Welwyn Garden City is England’s 2nd garden city, founded in 1920 by Sir Ebenezer Howard. Hatfield by contrast has a long history and was mentioned in the Domesday Book.

Who Do You Think You Are? Live! – Glasgow Announces List of Exhibitors

A list of exhibitors expected at next week’s Who Do You Think You Are? Live! expo in Glasgow, Scotland, has been posted on the organization’s web site. As you might expect, there will be a lot of Scottish exhibitors. However, I also see a number of nationally and internationally known vendors there as well: Ancestry.co.uk, Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), Deceased Online, FamilySearch, FamilyTreeDNA, Federation of Family History Societies, Guild of One-Name-Studies, National Institute for Genealogical Studies, and the Society of Genealogists.

You can view the entire list at http://www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com/about-show/our-exhibitors.

Jane Wilcox to Interview Robert Charles Anderson on Internet Radio

Here is a notice from “The Forget-Me-Not Hour:”

Robert Charles Anderson will join host Jane E. Wilcox on “The Forget-Me-Not Hour: Your Ancestors Want Their Stories to Be Told” radio show on Wednesday, 20 August at 10:00 a.m. Eastern time. Bob will talk about his latest book — hot off the press — entitled Elements of Genealogical Analysis. He will discuss this genealogical research methodology approach that he has used for more than 30 years in his work on the Great Migration Study Project. He’ll tell us what we can find in the book and how it can help us in our genealogy research.

Listen live or on-demand after the show airs at http://goo.gl/ZJLDWd.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. If your email provider blocked it, don’t forget that the latest Plus Edition newsletter is ALWAYS available at: http://www.eogn.com/wp/thisweek.htm. Your email provider cannot block that address so the newsletter is always available to you.

Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

On the Road Again, This Time to Scotland

(+) Genealogy Myths: Real, Fool’s Gold, or Both?

(+) QR Codes Create Internet-Connected Tombstones – A Good or Bad Idea?

(+) Why Are We Limited to Soundex?

Genealogy Software Review: Legacy Family Tree

(+) A Comparison Chart of Genealogy Software for Windows

Book Review: My Ancestor Settled in the British West Indies

Use Crowdsourcing to Identify the People in Photographs

Volunteers to Scan 40,000 Historic Titles at Onondaga County Public Library for Free Online Access

(+) Genealogy Myths: Real, Fool’s Gold, or Both?

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Family stories are a wonderful thing. They often give you insights into the lives of your ancestors. However, beware! Not all family stories are true. Many such stories are fictional. Yet, even the stories that are either entirely or part fiction may contain clues to facts. Good genealogical practice requires that we admit the fiction. But the next step the genealogist takes separates art from science. Before we discard these stories altogether, we need to mine them for nuggets of truth. Let’s look at a few of the more common “family legends” to see which ones you can mine for real gold.

Myth #1: Our name was changed at Ellis Island.

Fact: No evidence whatsoever exists to suggest this ever occurred. In fact, Ellis Island had rigid documentation requirements.

Genealogy Software Review: Legacy Family Tree

I have decided to write software reviews of all of the leading genealogy programs available today for Windows, Macintosh, Linux, Android, and Apple iOS, as well as cloud-based genealogy programs. This is the second article in the series: Legacy Family Tree, one of the more popular genealogy programs for Windows. I will later review genealogy programs for other operating systems as well.

I have also created a Windows Genealogy Software Comparison Chart showing the major features of each program reviewed so far. The Chart may be found at http://wp.me/p5Z3-FG.

Legacy Family Tree is one of the more popular genealogy programs available for the Windows operating system. Its popularity is caused by three major factors: it is powerful, it is easy to use, and it contains most all the features that serious genealogists demand. However, it also works well for genealogy newcomers. If you are looking for an easy-to-use genealogy program for a Windows PC, Legacy Family Tree absolutely should be on your list of programs to consider.

(+) A Comparison Chart of Genealogy Software for Windows

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman.

Genealogy Software for Windows Comparison

A side-by-side comparison of all programs reviewed to date: RootsMagic and Legacy Family Tree

An Unusual Family Reunion: the Descendants of William Douse of Prince Edward Island

It was not the sort of event you’d expect to find on the agenda of a family reunion, even a reunion of the Douse family.

William Douse was from Wiltshire, England. He emigrated to Prince Edward Island, Canada, in 1822 and became a successful businessman until his death in 1864. He was buried in a large crypt in the Old Protestant Burying Ground on University Avenue in Charlottetown. One hundred fifty years later, his descendants decided to open the crypt and to make repairs, making sure that William Douse and other family members entombed with him would rest in peace in restored surroundings. The opening and repairs were made during a multi-day family reunion.

Tintamarre Parade Draws Thousands of Acadian Descendants to Madawaska, Maine

Tintamarre, the traditional Acadian parade that for the 2014 World Acadian Congress was planned to be one of the biggest ever, and which wound its way down Main Street in Madawaska making the biggest racket possible. It made an amazing amount of noise — and it certainly was one of the biggest ever, with preliminary estimates from World Acadian Congress organizers putting the total number of people in the parade between 10,000 and 12,000.

Book Review: My Ancestor Settled in the British West Indies

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

My Ancestor Settled in the British West Indies.
By John Titford. Published by the Society of Genealogists Enterprises Limited, London. 2011. 253 pages.

Mr. Titford has written a book about the British families who immigrated to the West Indies and their associated records. Loss has been the key point of the records generated in the colonies. Neglect, destruction, and civil strife have taken their toll on these records of Anguilla, Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, British Guiana, British Honduras, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, Nevis, St Kitts, St Lucia, and St Vincent, Tobago, Trinidad, and Turks and Caicos Islands.

Reminder: 2014 FGS Conference Online Registration Ends August 19

The following was written by the organizers of the 2014 FGS Conference:

Online registration for the 2014 Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) Conference, scheduled 27-30 August 2014 in San Antonio, Texas, ends Tuesday, August 19. Register at http://www.fgsconference.org/registration. This year’s conference theme is “Gone to Texas,” and the local hosts are the San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society (SAGHS) and the Texas State Genealogical Society (TSGS).

Pre-registering for the conference gives you access to some great benefits. Those who have already registered for the conference still have time to purchase tickets to the conference “extras.”

(+) QR Codes Create Internet-Connected Tombstones – A Good or Bad Idea?

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

QR Codes have many uses. They are often used on business cards and also in printed advertisements. Mercedes-Benz attaches them to automobiles so that rescue crews can use their smartphones or tablets to instantly retrieve information on how to make a speedy and safe recovery when using the “jaws of life” to extricate victims from an auto accident. (See http://www.gizmag.com/mercedes-benz-qr-codes/27675/.) Now genealogists have recently been finding QR Codes on tombstones and on columbariums

NOTE: A columbarium is is a place for storage of cinerary urns (i.e. urns holding a deceased’s cremated remains).

A QR Code (abbreviated from Quick Response Code) is the trademark for a type of matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code) first designed for the automotive industry. You can see a typical QR Code to the right. You probably have seen similar QR Codes on all sorts of products and advertisements. To use a QR Code, use a smartphone (typically an Apple iPhone or an Android phone) with appropriate software installed to take a close-up picture of the QR Code. The software reads the QR Code and then opens a web browser that displays the web page address that is embedded within the dots of the QR Code.

Volunteers to Scan 40,000 Historic Titles at Onondaga County Public Library for Free Online Access

First it was a trickle, then a stream, then a river, and then the flow became a tsunami. Organizations everywhere are rushing to digitize books wherever they may be found. Through an agreement with FamilySearch.org, the Onondaga County (New York) Public Library’s collection of more than 40,000 historic titles soon will be carefully scanned, one page at a time, and uploaded for free genealogy research online.

FamilySearch supplied the scanning equipment. Volunteers supply the time. The project is expected to take more than a year to complete. Work got underway last week.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 5.1 Million Indexed Records and Images to Brazil, New Zealand, and the United States

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Family Search LogoFamilySearch has added more than 5.1 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, New Zealand, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 375,900 indexedrecords from the Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980, collection; the 1,152,816 indexed records and images from the U.S., BillionGraves Index, collection; and the 3,560,424 indexed records from U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

Valerie Bertinelli’s Episode on the U.S. Version of Who Do You Think You Are?

This week’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? featured Valerie Bertinelli, the Hot in Cleveland star. Unlike some of the past episodes with other celebrities, Valerie traced two different branches of her family tree: one on her father’s Italian ancestry and another on her mother’s Colonial American ancestry that was then traced back into England and ended with an ancestor most people have heard of: Edward the First, King of England from 1239 to 1307.

I do have to think the show’s producers ran out of time to provide further generations. Edward the First’s ancestry is well documented: his parents were King Henry III and Eleanor of Provence and their ancestry has been documented further back for several more generations. However, nothing prior to Edward the First was mentioned in the program.

Valerie Bertinelli’s Italian ancestry was perhaps more interesting, where she learned more about her beloved grandmother’s whose early years were not known to the rest of the family. Perhaps even more interesting was the story of her grandmother’s mother, Maria, an incredibly strong woman who overcame great odds. A young widow, she left Italy with her two small children at beginning of Word War I and settled in Pennsylvania. She then married for a second time. The woman escaped being murdered by her second husband, Gregorio, by pretending to be dead after being shot. Her husband then stepped into a second bedroom and committed suicide.

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