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Flyleaf Press Acquired By Ancestor Network

The following announcement was written by the folks at Ancestor Network:

Flyleaf Press Acquired By Ancestor Network: A New Chapter in Irish Genealogy Publishing Begins
Announcements

19 September 2014

Dublin, Ireland, 19 September 2014. Ancestor Network Ltd., the leading Irish family history services company, announced today that it has acquired Flyleaf Press, the specialist Irish genealogy publisher.

Ancestor Network, the leading probate and genealogy services provider, has been at the forefront of the Irish family history market for over five years. It has provided genealogy advisory services for public visitors to the National Archives of Ireland, the National Library of Ireland, and the Kerry Genealogy Roadshow. It was the primary genealogy researcher for RTE’s ‘The Genealogy Roadshow’ and has successfully managed popular genealogy educational courses and events across Ireland such as the Brian Ború Millennium Festival in Clare, Tipperary, Galway and Dublin, and the Monaghan Genealogy ‘Home to the Little Hills’ Training courses.

Department of Veterans Affairs Proposes to Build a Genealogy Database of 10 Million NEW Individual Genealogies Per Year

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has issued a a combined synopsis/solicitation for commercial corporations to bid on building a huge genealogy database, starting first with persons with roots in Washington and Oregon. The goal is to create a Genealogy Medical Phenotype Resource Database.

The request is to create 10 million NEW individual genealogies per year in electronic format for persons with roots in Washington and Oregon. If successful, the project will be continued a second year to add 10 million more individual genealogies. The VA proposed the ultimate creation of a U.S. genealogy of 100-200 million individuals, linked to the entire VA system (25 million individuals). This service contract will last for three years, through the duration of the MERIT review grant.

Create a Custom Email Newsletter from Any Blog

Do you like to read a particular genealogy blog or perhaps any other sort of online blog? Do you sometimes forget to check that blog frequently to read new articles? Would you prefer to receive frequent email message when new articles are posted rather than having to take time to check the blog manually? Perhaps you write a blog but would like to send it to readers via email in addition to the online web site? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, there is a simple and easy solution for you.

Blogtrottr converts your favorite blog sites’ RSS newsfeeds into a scheduled email newsletter that you receive as often as you want, so you can stay on top of all the news.

Almost all blogs offer RSS newsfeeds, as do many news services, stock market reports, weather forecasting services, sports sites, and hundreds of other web sites. If an online site you wish to monitor offers an RSS newsfeed, you can use Blogtrottr to convert those RSS newsfeeds into email messages that are sent to you at the times you specify, ranging from every 2 hours to once a day. If there are no new articles posted in the timeframe you specify, Blogtrottr doesn’t send an email.

Book Review: The Parrett Migration

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The Parrett Migration.
by Dawn Parrett Thurston. Published by the author. 2014. 315 pages.

Ms. Thurston recites the story of her ancestor Joseph Frederick Parrett of Ohio, whose origins were in the Rhineland of Europe. His river journey took him out of the Old Country of the Switzerland region and across the sea to the port of Philadelphia. He and his families settled in the eastern states, moved into Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, on to eastern Tennessee, Fayette County Ohio, Locust Grove Iowa, and finally to California.

Ms. Thurston proceeds to chronicle their lives. She enhances the stories with detailed period cultural and geographic descriptions. She writes her stories with the authority of meticulous, scrupulous, and extensive research, shifting the storyline beyond genealogy into historical reporting of keen interest to us.

The Disadvantage of a Scottish Brogue

The Scots are a proud people. The are also fiercely proud of their accents. However, that accent can occasionally be a disadvantage, as shown in this YouTube video of two Scotsmen who are frustrated by an elevator that uses voice recognition. (Warning, some profanity is in the video.)

You can watch the video at http://youtu.be/PJj_nO46gq8 or in the video player below.

​Bloggers and Others are Invited to Become An FGS Ambassador

The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:

FGS Invites You to Participate

September 18, 2014 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) is pleased to announce an invitation for FGS Ambassadors. If you are a blogger, social media enthusiast, writer, editor, or in any way interested in spreading the word about the FGS 2015 Conference, FGS is looking for you.

The 2015 FGS Conference scheduled for February 11–14 in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be a one-time special event with RootsTech. FGS Ambassadors will blog, share, like, +1, and tweet to spread the news about this unique FGS conference to their friends, colleagues, and everyone interested in genealogy.

Benefits to FGS Ambassadors include:

Irish Archives Resource Goes Online

Irish Archives Resource, abbreviated as “IAR,” is a portal that recently has been greatly expanded. It links together hundreds of unique archival collections and 34 archive services in Ireland north and south. Ireland’s first archive web portal, Irish Archives Resource (IAR), includes contribution from Trinity College Dublin’s Manuscripts and Archives Research Department, RTÉ Stills Library, National Museum of Ireland Archives, University College Cork Archives, Derry City Council Heritage and Museum Service, and the archives of St Patrick’s College, Maynooth. It does not hold any images of archives or records. Instead, it provides a means to search archival descriptions from various contributing institutions.

The archive is not specifically a genealogy resource. Instead, it contains all sorts of archival descriptions, many of which will prove to be useful resources to genealogists, historians, social scientists, film historians, Irish citizens, Irish emigrants and their descendants, and to many others. It should appeal to anyone interested in accessing Ireland’s archival heritage.

Library that Provides San Antonio’s Mexican American and Working Class Historical Resources to Cut Services

Writing in the mySanAntonio web site, Sarah Gould writs about the planned cutback of services at one of the San Antonio Public Library’s greatest assets”

“The Westside Preservation Alliance, a community-based historic preservation organization dedicated to preserving and promoting the history of San Antonio’s Mexican American and working class communities, supports keeping the Texana Room open to the public for a minimum of 40 hours per week.

Zuta, the Tiny Printer that Fits in a Briefcase or in Your Pocket

I travel a lot. Of course, I always take along a laptop computer. …and a tablet computer … and a cell phone. I use them often while traveling and occasionally have a need to print something. Of course, packing a printer in the suitcase is close to impossible these days. To be sure, there are a few compact printers that are advertised as “portable” but I have always found them lacking. They are either a bit too big and bulky or else they print slowly or only on special paper that feels “waxy” and rubs off on your fingers. In short, I have never found a portable printer that I wanted to carry with me… until now.

Zuta is a tiny printer that is entering production now. It is expected to ship in January or soon after and will have a price tag of about $240. To be sure, it will be a slow printer at 1.2 pages per minute but it is compact, not much bigger than a softball. You won’t use the Zuta to print a book but it should work great whenever you need to print two or three pages. It will print on normal paper as used in almost all other inkjet printers.

National Genealogical Society Seeks Nominations for the 2015 Genealogy Hall Of Fame

The following announcement was written by the (U.S.) National Genealogical Society”

Would your society like to honor a genealogist whose exemplary work lives on today? Perhaps there was a notable genealogist in your state or county whose name should be memorialized in the National Genealogy Hall of Fame.

If so, the National Genealogical Society would like to hear from you. NGS is seeking nominations from the entire genealogical community for persons whose achievements or contributions have made an impact on the field. This educational program increases appreciation of the high standards advocated and achieved by committed genealogists whose work paved the way for researchers today.

Convert an Address to Latitude and Longitude

You can pinpoint any place on Earth using a single set of coordinates: latitude and longitude. These coordinates look like a string of numbers. Once you have those numbers, you’ll be able to plug them into a web map, GPS, or other mapping device and find what you’re looking for in an instant — no matter where on the planet it is.

Using latitude and longitude information makes it easy to find your ancestors’ homestead, your own house, the county courthouse in a distant city, or any other location of genealogical interest.

The coordinates are similar to the Xs and Ys you used to plot in algebra class. Imagine if the surface of the Earth could be stretched flat. Then suppose you place a grid on top of the flattened world. You could pinpoint any location by finding the spot where the horizontal and vertical grid lines intersect. The horizontal x-axis is the equator, while the vertical y-axis is the Prime Meridian, which runs through the Greenwich Observatory in England.

Click on the above image to view a larger version.

Chromebooks vs. Windows Laptops: What Should You Buy?

I have written often about the advantages of Chromebooks when compared to Windows systems. (See my past Chromebook articles by starting at http://goo.gl/nz9UMN.) Now Laptop Magazine has published a side-by-side comparison by Anna Attkisson of Chromebooks versus Windows. If you are considering the purchase of either a Windows or Chromebook laptop, you will want to read the article.

Attkisson compares the following:

Funeral Home Offers Drive-Thru Viewing

Click on the image to view a larger version.

The Paradise Funeral Chapel of Saginaw, Michigan, isn’t the first funeral home to offer a drive-though viewing window. However, the funeral home’s services do sound a bit more high-tech than most of the others.

The funeral home has installed a window that displays a body set up in a special area inside the building with a raised and tilted platform for the casket. Curtains over the window automatically open when a car pulls up, and mourners get three minutes to view a body as music plays overhead.

(+) Carry Your Genealogy Database in Your Wristwatch

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

A recent article by Adrian Kingsley-Hughes, published in the ZDnet web site (at http://goo.gl/kbp7Vi), got me thinking about genealogy data. Kingsley-Hughes described Samsung’s new Galaxy Gear S smartwatch, and he compared it to the first iPhone that was released only seven years ago. He points out that many of the smartphone apps that a lot of us now use should work well if converted by programmers to operate on the new smartwatch. Can’t we say the same about genealogy apps? Maybe. Obviously, programmers would have to port the software over to the new watches, but the technology already exists to run and display mobile apps that many of us already use.

Eight years ago, before the invention of smartphones and before the popularity of tablet computers, genealogists were limited to keeping their databases in desktop and laptop computers. A few tablet computers existed in those days but never became popular until Apple released the first iPad. Taking your data with you seven years ago meant carrying a 5- or 6-pound computer although lighter laptop computers have since become popular.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. If your email provider blocked it, don’t forget that the latest Plus Edition newsletter is ALWAYS available at: http://www.eogn.com/wp/thisweek.htm. Your email provider cannot block that address so the newsletter is always available to you.

Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) What is a Genogram and Why Should I Create One?

Was Jack the Ripper REALLY Identified through DNA? I Doubt It.

Your Picture in an Automobile

What Is the Cloud?

With Genetic Testing, I Gave My Parents the Gift of Divorce

MacBridge for RootsMagic 6: Run RootsMagic on Your Mac without Windows

(+) What is a Genogram and Why Should I Create One?

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Almost all genealogists are familiar with pedigree charts. These are basic charts for recording parents, grandparents, and earlier generations for an individual. Pedigree charts are used to show bloodlines and are limited to displaying only ancestors. Pedigree charts do not display siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles or other extended relatives. Here is an example of a pedigree chart:

Click on the above to view a larger image.

Pedigree charts have long been a standard tool used by genealogists and others. They are easy to understand and clearly display a lot of information in a small amount of space. However, pedigree charts are limited in what they can display, normally showing only the name of each individual and the places and dates of birth, marriage, and death. They do not show relationships of siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, or other extended relatives. They also do not display the dynamics of a family over multiple generations.

Medical professionals also have a need to show family relationships in order to understand inherited medical conditions. The medical community often needs to collect and display information about patterns of mental and physical illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder, cancer, substance abuse, and other diseases that seem to run in families. Pedigree charts are ineffective for such uses.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

British Columbia, Ireland, Ontario, United Kingdom, Genealogy Cruises, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

New Images Added to PERSI

The Periodical Source Index, or PERSI, is the largest subject index to genealogy and local history periodical articles in the world. It is an index to more than 2.5 million entries from thousands of historical, genealogical and ethnic publications. Most of PERSI’s articles are from periodicals covering the United States and Canada, but you can also find thousands of genealogy and local history entries (in both English and French) from Britain, Ireland and Australia.

Created by the staff of the Allen County Public Library Foundation and the ACPL’s Genealogy Center, PERSI is widely recognized as a vital tool for genealogical researchers. For years, PERSI was available in a series of books but now is available online at the FindMyPast web site. PERSI is updated frequently. Now FindMyPast has images to the indexes, allowing the user to access articles, photos, and other material that might be difficult to find using other research methods. PERSI’s titles may be searched free of charge although viewing the contents found requires a paid FindMyPast subscription.

According to the FindMyPast Blog, the list of images added to periodicals in the past month include:

Your Picture in an Automobile

Sometimes we take certain things for granted. We often don’t stop to realize what life was like for our ancestors. We may have skills that our ancestor did not possess. Today I stumbled across some old photographs that made me stop and think.

In 1905 the automobile was a novelty. Very few people had ever driven one, much less owned one. After looking at a couple of photographs, I realized that most people did not know how to drive in those days.

Today most adults are familiar with driving automobiles. However, 100 or more years ago, that was not true. In fact, the idea of someone driving an automobile was so unique that commercial photographers of the time often took advantage of the automobile to sell more photographs.

Senator Demands US Courts Recover 10 Years of Online Public Records

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) says the removal of the thousands of cases from online review is essentially erasing history. The documents were deleted last month from online viewing because of an upgrade to a computer database known as PACER.

“Wholesale removal of thousands of cases from PACER, particularly from four of our federal courts of appeals, will severely limit access to information not only for legal practitioners, but also for legal scholars, historians, journalists, and private litigants for whom PACER has become the go-to source for most court filings,” Leahy wrote Friday to US District Judge John D. Bates, the director of the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO).

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