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Family Tree DNA to Offer 20% off from April 25 to 29

Family Tree DNA has sent project administrators a pre-announcement of a limited DNA Day sale, in effect only April 25-29. The 20%-off sale applies only to Y-DNA SNP tests and Y-DNA37, not to the company’s other services. The sale officially begins at 12:01AM on April 25 and will end at 11:59pm on April 29.

The sale has not yet been officially announced. However, keep an eye on the company’s web site at http://www.familytreedna.com for details that should appear soon.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. If your email provider blocked it, don’t forget that the latest Plus Edition newsletter is ALWAYS available at: http://www.eogn.com/wp/thisweek.htm. Your email provider cannot block that address so the newsletter is always available to you.

Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) How to Find City Directories For Sale Online

Want a Cheap Laptop? Add a Keyboard to an iPad or Android Tablet Computer

My Weekend with GOONS

A Review of OneNote for Macintosh versus Evernote

A Video Guide to Findmypast’s New Features

Archivist of the United States Announces Campaign to “Make Access Happen”

Find A Grave App for iPhone and iPad has been Updated

Ancestry.com has released a significant update for it popular Find A Grave App for iOS (Apple handheld devices). The new additions include: Profile Pages, view your memorials and photos, and the ability to save your favorite memorials to your virtual cemeteries. Improvements were made to Cemetery Search, rotation of photos, GPS Locations are now displayed, Memorial Manager, and more.

You can read the details in an article by Michael Lawless in the Ancestry.com Blog at http://goo.gl/ZQf3TX.

Recognition for Black Civil War Soldiers at Jefferson Barracks

The Jefferson Barracks Military Post is located on the Mississippi River at Lemay, Missouri, south of St. Louis. It was an important and highly active U.S. Army installation from 1826 through 1946.

Jefferson Barracks

(+) How to Find City Directories For Sale Online

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Gaffney City Directory - 1958

Gaffney City Directory – 1958

Looking for a city directory from the 1800s or early 1900s? You may be able to purchase the city directory you wish for modest prices. I have seen reprinted city directories sell for as little as $2.00 while digital copies on CD-ROM frequently sell for about $5.00 or so. Even the original city directories printed in the 1800s sometimes sell for as little as $4.95 although $10 or $15 seems to be a more common price.

Best of all, if you don’t see what you want today, you can create an “automated search robot” that will check for you every day. If the robot finds an item that matches the search terms you specify, it will send you an email message to notify you of the latest addition. It will search for you even while you are sleeping, even if your computer is turned off.

A Video Guide to Findmypast’s New Features

Findmypast Video Guide
Myko Clelland at findmypast has created a video guide to the new findmypast site. The video introduces some of the new features and explains some of the techniques which will help you discover even more about your family’s history. You can learn more in the findmypast blog at http://blog.findmypast.co.uk/2014/a-handy-video-guide-to-findmypasts-new-features/.

Indiana State Library Announces a New Online Platform to Provide Access to Thousands of Historic Indiana Newspapers

The following announcement was written by the folks at Indiana State Library:

INDIANAPOLIS – Three weeks after unveiling the new Indiana Memory, the Indiana State Library has now introduced the website’s new Indiana Newspapers platform. Clicking on the “Indiana Newspapers” icon on Indiana Memory will take you to all of the newspapers digitized as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program.

This collection contains 14,214 issues comprising 95,455 pages and is continually growing. Many of these titles are also available at the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America website. IDHNP provides free, online access to high quality digital images of Indiana’s historic newspapers, links to online resources and assistance to other organizations in making their collections accessible. This online resource is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This grant enabled the Indiana State Library, in partnership with the Indiana Historical Society, to digitize Indiana newspapers for the National Digital Newspaper Program.

Use Longaccess to Save your Digital Data for your Heirs

LongaccessLongaccess promises to be a cold storage of sorts for your digital life. It’s a cloud-based service that will store your files, both for your immediate access and also for access by your heirs. It is sort of like Dropbox in a Swiss vault. However, compared to Dropbox, Longaccess claims files stored on its service will be less accessible, but more dependable. Longaccess reportedfly is good for both personal and business files.

Longaccess is your safe on the Internet. It’s a place where you can store valuable files, fully encrypted and secured, available for decades. The files you store in Longaccess can be of any size, from a couple kilobytes to many gigabytes.

Vatican Will Digitize Millions of its Documents

The Vatican Library was founded in 1451 and has around 82,000 manuscripts, some of which date back about 1,800 years. The library is now working to to convert the first batch of 3,000 manuscripts, with more manuscripts to be digitized later.

Vatican LibraryAn article in Mashable.com describes how the process will work. Workers wear gloves and have to remove all jewelry so as to avoid scratching the paper. After each page is digitized, they will be configured for long-term storage as well as be uploaded onto the Vatican Library’s website, where viewers will be able to look at them for free from a variety of angles.

Documentary Depicts History of the Cajuns

The Story Of The Cajuns

The Story Of The Cajuns

A Cajun film, seven years in the making, will premier in Louisiana this month in New Orleans and throughout Acadiana. It is also available on a DVD disk.

In The Story Of The Cajuns – Part I, film makers Brenda Jepson and Dr. Francoise Paradis interview Cajuns from all walks of life – from a shrimp fisherman to a college professor and from a cowboy to an Acadian artist. The film tells the story of how Acadians expelled during the Deportation made the arduous journey, some of them via France, to their new home in Louisiana. It explores the hardships they faced and reveals how they survived and thrived in a climate so different from their ancestral Acadie. The documentary was filmed in France, Canada and Maine.

RootsTech 2015 Call for Presentations

RootsTech 2015

The RootsTech Content Committee is calling for dynamic presentations for RootsTech 2015 that inform and educate both those seeking to begin and those continuing to discovering their family story through technology.

Presentation submissions will be accepted June 2 to June 27, 2014, through the Call for Presentations portal on RootsTech.org.

You can read more at https://familysearch.org/blog/en/rootstech-2015-call-presentations/.

 

This newsletter has been moved to a temporary host

As a temporary measure, I have moved the Standard Edition newsletter’s web site to a temporary host on wordpress.com.

The hosting company where the Standard Edition newsletter runs has been receiving intermittent DDOS attacks for several days. The blog.eogn.com pages have been up and down repeatedly for more than 36 hours. The other pages on eogn.com remained in operation but most site visitors had no way of learning that.

The Plus Edition is still working at http://eogn.com/wp.

The new website looks very different from the newsletter you are used to reading and I am sure there are hundreds of broken links. All recent newsletter article are being posted at the new, temporary web site. However, that will require a few hours.

Want a Cheap Laptop? Add a Keyboard to an iPad or Android Tablet Computer

Many people own and love their tablet computers. I have an Pad Mini and it has become my primary traveling computer. I hear similar statements from owners of various Android tablets as well. As useful as these tiny powerhouses may be, they are still seriously hampered by the lack of a keyboard. The solution? Add a keyboard!

iPad Mini with Logitech Keyboard

That suggestion is obvious. Adding an external high quality keyboard converts a tablet computer into a reasonably-priced laptop computer. Perhaps it should be called a netbook.

FamilySearch Seeks Feedback from Volunteer Indexers

The FamilySearch method of creating indexes of old records has been described many times in this newsletter and many other genealogy publications. FamilySearch is now planning to introduce a new process to maintain indexing quality. In this new model, a single volunteer will index and submit a batch, and a second volunteer will review the completed work. The person reviewing the batch will have the ability to add corrections to the values entered by the first indexer, and both values can be included in the searchable index on FamilySearch.org.

Woman Claims She’s the Virgin Mary’s Cousin 65 Times Removed

I won’t offer any opinion about the accuracy of this article but I certainly would like to see the source citations.

A Pennsylvania woman claims she is the 64th great-granddaughter of Saint Joseph Ben Matthat Arimathaea, who was the paternal uncle to the Virgin Mary. Ashlie Hardway of WTAE Television reports that Mary Beth Webb, of Murrysville, Pennsylvania, said she began searching her ancestry in 2010 after years of “communicating” with her deceased mother, father and brother. While doing the research on ancestry.com over a two-year period, Webb discovered the connection to Saint Joseph.

You can decide for yourself after reading the article and watching the video at http://goo.gl/rXQbdr.

2015 FGS National Conference Call for Presentations

The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:

2015 FGS NATIONAL CONFERENCE CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

Submissions will be accepted between May 1, 2014 and May 31, 2014

April 17, 2014 – Austin, TX. – The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) announces a Call for Presentations for the FGS 2015 Conference, “Connect. Explore. Refresh.” to be held February 11-14, 2015, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The 2015 Conference will be held at the same time as the RootsTech 2015 Conference. Submissions will be accepted online between May 1, 2014 and May 31, 2014.

 

Archivist of the United States Announces Campaign to “Make Access Happen”

David Ferriero, the Archivist of the United States, has written in his own blog about a goal to provide U.S. citizens with easier and faster access to materials held at the National Archives and Records Administration. He writes:


“The first of our new strategic goals is to ‘Make Access Happen.’ Increasingly, access means digital, online access. Our first goal has one objective, to make our records available to the public in digital form to ensure that anyone can explore, discover and learn from our records.”

You can read his full article at http://blogs.archives.gov/aotus/?p=5417.

92-Year-Old Man Writes His Own 3-Word Obituary

Several articles have been posted here about humorous obituaries, many of the written by the deceased in advance of the “final event.” Now Stig Kernell, a Swedish resident, gave his funeral home instructions before he died on April 6, and the funeral home followed through, publishing the 3-word obituary in two newspapers on Saturday.

Stig Kernell’s obituary, published in newspaper Dagens Nyheter, states “I Am Dead.”

Well, that DOES sum it up.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 2.1 Million Images to Collections from Italy

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added more than 2.1 million images to collections from Italy. Notable collection updates include the 89,778 images from the new Italy, Lucca, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1807–1814, collection; the 445,302 images from the new Italy, Genova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1796–1812, 1838–1859, 1866–1899, collection; and the 1,637,317 images from the Italy, Napoli, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1865, collection. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

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