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Book Review: The People of Ireland 1600-1699, Part Four

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The People of Ireland 1600-1699, Part Four
by David Dobson
Printed for Clearfield Co. by Genealogical Publishing Co., 2014. 114 pages.

Mr. Dobson gathered the 17th-century names of “ordinary people” whose roots were native to Ireland, or who were immigrant English, with a few names of Huguenot and Dutch immigrants. These collected names can be used to identify locations of families during the 1600s. Those persons of Scottish origin are collected in Mr. Dobson’s Scots-Irish Links, 1575-1725, and are not included in the People of Ireland works.

Mr. Dobson writes that there are few church baptism, marriage, and burial records from the Irish Catholic parishes before the mid-1750s. Presbyterian church records date from the 1670s, and the Quakers maintained records from the 1650s. As the predominant religion, the missing Catholic records represent a significant amount of missing data. Mr. Dobson accessed a considerable amount of material not available to the ordinary researcher, along with primary sources such as governmental records and references found in Irish, British, and European sources.

Help for Texas Flood Victims to Salvage Wet Documents and Heirlooms

Conservators and students at The University of Texas at Austin’s School of Information are available to provide advice and limited disaster recovery assistance to help this weekend’s flood victims salvage damaged family treasures. Wet papers and photographs, textiles, scrapbooks, books and other sentimental objects should be frozen, if possible, and not thrown out, the conservators say.

Losing such items can be devastating after disasters such as floods. Luckily, many things can be salvaged with proper guidance.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 1.7 Million Indexed Records and Images for Australia, China, India, Peru, the Philippines, and the United States

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 1.7 million indexed records and images for Australia, China, India, Peru, the Philippines, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 327,195 images from the Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874–1996 collection; 275,449 images from the Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005 collection; and 249,700 images from the Peru, San Martín, Civil Registration, 1850–1999 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) How to Use the GPS You May Already Own but Didn’t Know You Had

(+) Rescue Old Photos and Documents: Make a Humidification Chamber

Google Power Search: How to Search by a Date Range and Why You Might Want To

How to use the Upper Saint John Valley (Northern Maine and Northwestern New Brunswick) Historical Land Grant Database to Find Your Ancestors

Mocavo Announces: U.S. Federal Census Images & Viewer are now Free for Everyone Forever

How Castle Garden Records Burned in the Ellis Island Fire

NGS Introduces Four New Research in the States Books: California, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Nebraska

(+) How to Use the GPS You May Already Own but Didn’t Know You Had

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

GPS (Global Positioning System) devices are very useful tools for genealogists. These devices can be used to find locations easily and are often accurate plus or minus ten feet or so. Genealogists typically use GPS receivers to find or to document cemetery tombstone locations as well as to find old homesteads, courthouses, libraries, or even fast-food restaurants when traveling on research trips.

I have frequently used the U.S. Government’s Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) at http://geonames.usgs.gov/pls/gnispublic/ to locate old cemeteries, even small ones of only a dozen graves or even less. The information provided in the GNIS includes the exact latitude and longitude of each named feature, including cemeteries. GNIS provides the exact location of the entrance to each cemetery although not the location of individual tombstones within the cemetery. The GNIS data is “read only.” That is, you read the information in a web browser and then manually copy the displayed latitude and longitude into a GPS receiver of your choice. More sophisticated and easier-to-use systems are now available.

Mocavo Announces: U.S. Federal Census Images & Viewer are now Free for Everyone Forever

The folks at Mocavo.com have posted an announcement that says (in part), “Today, we are thrilled to announce that for the first time anywhere, the indexes and images for all United States Federal Census are now available for free to everyone.” This is good news for anyone researching U.S. ancestry.

How Castle Garden Records Burned in the Ellis Island Fire

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will hold a live webinar that should interest many genealogists. Here is the announcement:

How Castle Garden Records Burned in the Ellis Island Fire*

USCIS “Records Found” LIVE Webinar, Friday, May 29, 2015 1:00 PM (Eastern)

Exactly what records burned in the 1897 fire that consumed Ellis Island? Were “some,” “many,” “most,” or “all” records destroyed? Were passenger lists destroyed or “only administrative” records? Some say State and municipal records were burned, but why would those records be at a Federal immigration station? Did we really lose anything in that fire? Join Marian L. Smith and the live USCIS Records Found webinar at 1:00 p.m. ET on Friday, May 29th for answers to these burning questions for New York passenger list research.

A Proposal to Abolish the Alabama Historic Commission

The Alabama Pioneers web site contains an email message from Ted Urquhart, President of the Alabama Cemetery Preservation Alliance. He states:

“You may already be aware that a bill has been introduced to the Alabama House of Representatives to abolish the Alabama Historic Commission (AHC) and transfer most – but not all – of its responsibilities and holdings to the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH) and the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR).

C.E. Brehm Memorial Public Library in Mt Vernon, Illinois to Expand Genealogy Department

The C.E. Brehm Memorial Public Library collects materials reflecting the general migration patterns of people in Southern Illinois. The primary focus is on Virginia, North and South Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky, as well as Southern Illinois. Of secondary importance are materials covering other migration routes through Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Arkansas and Louisiana. Now the Genealogy Department will be moved into a new, larger facility.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of previous events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

(+) Rescue Old Photos and Documents: Make a Humidification Chamber

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Old documents, newspapers, and photographs are often improperly stored. They may have been rolled or folded for years. By the time that you, the family historian, find these items and wish to view them, the documents may be damaged if forced open. Old paper, especially that manufactured after 1885, becomes brittle with age. This will be doubly true if the document has been stored in a very low-humidity environment, such as an attic. Old or fragile items may even crack and crumble if not handled properly.

The primary problem is that old paper and photographs that have not been stored properly will become dried out over the years. Dryness creates brittleness, which then causes damage when the item is not handled properly. Have you ever seen someone tenderly – but wrongly – try to uncurl an old photo or unfold an old news clipping, only to see it crumble in their hands? It’s a sad sight.

Do not attempt to open brittle documents!

How to use the Upper Saint John Valley (Northern Maine and Northwestern New Brunswick) Historical Land Grant Database to Find Your Ancestors

Do you have ancestors from the Upper Saint John Valley? I do. That’s 50% of my ancestry and I also lived there for a few years. I was recently told of a great genealogy database for the area. If you also have an interest in the history and the people of the Upper Saint John Valley, you will want to read this article written by George L. Findlen, CG, CGL. He describes how to locate a family in a land grants database and how to use the information found there with other resources in order to track a family (some, not all) from 1845 forward in time.

The process requires multiple steps but the effort is worth it. The following is published here with the kind permission of author George L. Findlen:

Upper Saint John Valley (Northern Maine and Northwestern New Brunswick) Historical Land Grant Database

By George L. Findlen, CG, CGL

The 2014 Congrès Mondial Acadien (World Acadian Reunion) took place in the Upper Saint John Valley on the Maine–New Brunswick border in August. The three-week event was filled with cultural, historical, religious, and entertainment events. The core of the CMA was a series of family reunions, 120 of them, which included some Yankee and Quebec names, since they and Acadians have intermarried over the years.

Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research Announces Upcoming Courses and Offers Memorial Day Drawing for Free Course

The following announcement was written by the folks at the Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research:

RALEIGH, North Carolina, 22 May 2015. Registration is currently open for six upcoming courses offered by the Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research.

“We are very excited about these new courses, covering genetic genealogy; English, German and Native American research; and U.S. federal land and Revolutionary War records,” said co-administrator Michael Hait, CG. “The response to our courses has been outstanding! The Virtual Institute is an excellent option for in-depth genealogical education, especially for those with limited travel options.”

In celebration of Memorial Day, the Virtual Institute is also offering a drawing for everyone who registers for a course between Friday, 22 May 2015 and Monday, 25 May 2015 at midnight (U.S. Eastern). Each registrant will be entered into the drawing to win a free additional course ($69.99 value). Those registering for multiple courses will receive multiple entries. Three winners will be drawn. The prizes can be applied to any standard course prior to 31 December 2016, not including the original course registration.

Registration for the following courses is currently open:

Discount on Genealone WP (Genealogy Plugin for WordPress)

I have written before about Genealone, a product that allows you to quickly and easily build your own genealogy web site. See https://goo.gl/RZlgPF to find my earlier articles. The following message was written by David Nebesky of Genealone.com

You can get 50% discount on genealogy plugin for WordPress from Genealone now. With Genealone WP you can publish your family tree on your blog or WordPress site easily. The plugin imports GEDCOM files, displays charts and maps, finds relationship etc. For more information and for online demo please visit http://genealone.com/genealone-wp.

World War II Spitfire Pilot Takes His Legacy Online

What will people know about you after you die? Some people are going a step further, and creating a virtual “shoeboxes” of family photographs, love letters, marriage certificates, priceless video clips and key documents, in an attempt to preserve their most precious memories.

One such person is Brian Bird, a former World War II Spitfire pilot who has lived a long, exciting – and at times terrifying – life. Now, at the age of 90, he is embarking on one of his most important missions, to create a digital record for his family to remember him by after his death.

New Records Available to Search at Findmypast

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

This Findmypast Friday marks the release over 154,000 fascinating apprenticeship records from two of London’s historic liveries. This week’s additions also include mortuary register records from the London borough of Southwark, Royal Navy officer’s award index records and over half a million new passenger list records from Victoria, Australia’s most populous state.

Haberdasher and Ironmonger records

Containing over 136,000 records, City of London Haberdashers, Apprentices and Freemen 1526-1933 lists the details of apprentices who trained with the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers in the City of London. Founded in 1516, the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers is one of London’s twelve historic liveries. Haberdashers sold accessory items such as hats, scarves, gloves, shawls, parasols, needles, buttons and thread. They traded from the shops and stalls around Cheapside and probably worshipped together in the old St Paul’s Cathedral in a chapel to St Catherine of Alexandria, who was to become the Fraternity of Haberdashers’ chosen patron saint. Company membership allowed individuals to become a Freeman; a person who was not tied to land as a villein or serf. Apprentices travelled from all over the country to join the company.

Records from the Jersey Archive in the Channel Islands Go Online for the First Time

The Ancestry.com Blog reports that the Jersey, Channel Islands, Wills and Testaments collection covering the years 1663-1948 and the Jersey, Channel Islands, Occupation Registration Cards from World War Two covering the years 1940-1945. Both these collections will be of enormous benefit to anyone who is eager to learn more about their Jersey family history. Some of the most common surnames found in these collections include, De Gruchy, Renouf, Hamon, Amy, Bisson, Querée, Le Brocq, Le Marquand, Le Cornu, and De La Haye.

Scottish Genealogist Dr Bruce Durie Receives Prestigious Fulbright Award

The following announcement was written by the Fulbright Commission:

Dr. Bruce Durie, internationally recognized as one of Scotland’s top genealogists, has been granted the prestigious Fulbright Scottish Studies Scholar Award. This will enable him to spend seven months research and teaching at an American University, on one of the most prestigious and selective scholarship programmes operating world-wide.

Dr. Durie will be researching Lowland Scots migration to the Carolinas, and teaching classes on Scottish Genealogy, Culture and History at St Andrews University, Laurinburg, North Carolina, from January to July 2016.

Commenting on receiving the award, Dr. Durie said:

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fulfill a longstanding ambition. So much of Scottish-American migration is told in terms of the Highland and the Ulster Scots. But Lowlanders probably predominated in the early days of the settlement of that part of America, and subsequently.

Ancestry.com’s Owners Reportedly are Exploring a Possible Sale of the Company

This story strikes me as non-news: Reuters News Agency is reporting that Ancestry.com LLC, the world’s largest family historical past website, is exploring a sale that would be worth between $2.5 billion and $3 billion, together with debt, based on information from individuals acquainted with the matter. Permira Advisers LLC, the buyout agency that owns most of privately held Ancestry, has employed funding banks to run a public sale for the corporate, according to unnamed sources.

You can read the story at http://goo.gl/TTazpi and at a few other web sites as well.

I am repeating the rumors here because there is a lot of buzz about this story. However, I am surprised that anyone would be surprised that Permira Advisers LLC is thinking of selling. Of course Ancestry.com is for sale!

Jason Scott Sadofsky Wants Your Old AOL CDs

Finally! Someone has found a use for all those AOL disks that were sent to your house and given away by many stores. Jason Scott Sadofsky is a Free-Range Archivist & Software Curator for the Internet Archive. He wants every disc ever made, but is specifically requesting that readers of his blog send him old AOL discs, the kind that came free at Best Buy checkouts, packed in magazines and mailed randomly to your house back in the 1990s. He wants to add them to an online archive of computer history.

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