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NGS Awards Deadline Approaching: January 31

The following was written by the (U.S.) National Genealogical Society:

Arlington, VA, 26 JANUARY 2015: Each year, the National Genealogical Society recognizes excellence within the genealogy field through a number of awards. The deadline for several of these awards—January 31—is quickly approaching. NGS encourages its members, member societies, and other organizations to review the requirements and make submissions. Winners will be recognized at the NGS Family History Conference, to be held May 13-16, 2015 in St. Charles, Missouri.

The following NGS awards have a deadline of January 31:

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. If your email provider blocked it, don’t forget that the latest Plus Edition newsletter is ALWAYS available at: http://www.eogn.com/wp/thisweek.htm. Your email provider cannot block that address so the newsletter is always available to you.

Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) How to become a Paid Genealogy Speaker

(+) Internet Archive Wants to Store Everything, Including Books

Both the RootsTech 2015 and FGS 2015 Conferences will be Held on February 11–14

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech/FGS Conference in Salt Lake City

January 25 is Robert Burns Day So Let’s Eat Vegetarian Haggis

Is There Any Such Thing as a Half-Cousin?

Genealogy Roadshow, Season 2, Episode 2

Amazon Kindle Textbook Creator

(+) Internet Archive Wants to Store Everything, Including Books

The following Plus Edition article is written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

What does a library look like anymore?

When Egyptian King Ptolemy I built the Library of Alexandria nearly 2,300 years ago, the great library became the intellectual center of the ancient world. Ptolemy hoped to gather as much human knowledge as possible. Even ships anchored in the port were impounded until all the manuscripts they contained could be copied. World leaders lent their scrolls for duplication, and library officials traveled far and wide to purchase entire collections. Meanwhile, dutiful scribes hand-copied the library’s awesome collection, which eventually grew to as many as 700,000 scrolls.

Brewster Kahle is a modern-day Ptolemy: he wants to ensure universal access to all human knowledge. And now he thinks that goal is within our grasp. In fact, his web site, called The Internet Archive, has already stored 430 billion web pages. Yes, that’s BILLIONS of web pages. However, this online archive has a lot more than just web pages. It serves as an online library, the largest such library in the world. People download 20 million books from the site each month. This online library gets more visitors in a year than most libraries do in a lifetime.

Both the RootsTech 2015 and FGS 2015 Conferences will be Held on February 11–14

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and RootsTech are teaming up for a one-time special genealogy event at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, February 11–14, 2015. You can attend not one, but two, major genealogy conferences at the same time. If you can be in Salt Lake City those days, you won’t want to miss this event. It undoubtedly will be the largest genealogy gathering of the year in North America.

NOTE: I will be at the conferences also and will be hosting a dinner for readers of this newsletter on Saturday evening. I’ll write about the dinner in a separate article.

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech/FGS Conference in Salt Lake City

Do you think you will be hungry after the RootsTech/FGS Conference in Salt Lake City? Would you like to have dinner with a large group of genealogists? If so, join us for dinner! You are invited to join other genealogists on Saturday evening after the RootsTech 2015 conference for dinner. Rumor has it there will also be a few door prizes.

This dinner will be held at 7:30 PM, immediately after the close of the RootsTech/FGS 2015 Conference on February 14. You are invited whether you subscribe to the newsletter or not. Bring your friends and family also.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of previous events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

94-year-old Can’t File Tax Return because IRS Says He’s Dead

Apparently not every bit of information in the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) is accurate. There is a 94-year-old World War II vet in Ohio who just wants to pay his taxes but can’t because the IRS says he’s dead.

Siegfried Meinstein has been unable to convince the IRS he is alive, living in an assisted living facility near Columbus, Ohio. The IRS has told the nonagenarian it can’t process his tax return because their records indicate he is deceased.

January 25 is Robert Burns Day So Let’s Eat Vegetarian Haggis

The great Scottish poet Robert Burns was born January 25, 1759. In celebration of his birthday, Burns Suppers range from formal gatherings of esthetes and scholars to very informal dinners throughout Scotland and in restaurants and the homes of Scottish descendants worldwide. Most Burns Suppers adhere, more or less, to some sort of time honored form which includes the eating of a traditional Scottish meal, the drinking of Scotch whisky, and the recitation of works by, about, and in the spirit of the Bard.

NOTE: American and Irish liquor producers spell it as WHISKEY, while Canadian, Scottish, and Japanese producers usually spell it without an “e”: WHISKY.

Almost anyone can enjoy a Burns Night celebration. All that’s needed is a place to gather, plenty of haggis and neeps to go around, a master of ceremonies, friendly celebrants, and good Scotch drink to keep you warm.

2015 FGS Conference Early Registration Discount Extended Until Monday, January 26

If you missed the deadline, you have until Monday to register. The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:

2015 FGS Conference Early registration discount Extended

January 23, 2015 – Austin, TX. The early registration discount for the 2015 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference has been extended to midnight (MST), Monday, January 26. This extension allows three more days to register at $159 for the full four days of the conference coming up February 11–14 in Salt Lake City, Utah in conjunction with RootsTech.

(+) How to become a Paid Genealogy Speaker

The following Plus Edition article is written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Ah, the glamorous life: flying from city to city, giving presentations before genealogy conferences and society meetings. How would you like to do the same?

Amazon Kindle Textbook Creator

A new product from Amazon to create Kindle ebooks has the word “Textbook” in its name but it appears to work for all sorts of books. Of course, I am thinking about genealogy books. The new software appears to be an extension to the already-available Kindle Direct Publishing application.

Kindle Textbook Creator even makes it easy to transform PDFs into an e-book format. I haven’t used the product yet but hope to do so soon. I noticed that Amazon claims its Textbook Creator offers a simple way to organize an array of educational materials — graphs, equations, charts or anything else you might find in a textbook.

Best of all, Kindle Textbook Creator is available free of charge for Windows and Macintosh. The books can be read on all sorts of devices, including Amazon’s Kindles, of course, as well as iPads, iPhones or Android devices.

NTIS Extends Comments Period for Proposed Changes to the Certification for Access to the Death Master File (DMF)

The Death Master File, or DMF, is better known to genealogists as the SDSDI or Social Security Death Index. The National Technical Information Service (NTIS) has proposed new rules that will, if implemented, create a certification program to replace the temporary certification program currently in place for access to the DMF. The result will create an expensive impediment to genealogists attempting to learn more about their ancestors.

For more information, see my earlier articles at http://goo.gl/vq5fSF and at http://goo.gl/U7MJLs.

I’m My Own Grandpa

Some of the readers’ comments following my recent article of Is There Any Such Thing as a Half-Cousin? at http://goo.gl/j4y3q1 described some complex relationships. The comments include stories of “double first cousins,” children who are simultaneously siblings as well as cousins, and more. All of this reminds me of a popular song from the 1940s called I’m My Own Grandpa.

The song was written by Dwight Latham and Moe Jaffe, performed by Lonzo and Oscar in 1947, about a man who, through an unlikely (but legal) combination of marriages, becomes stepfather to his own stepmother. The song pays no attention to the prefix “step-” however. As a result, the singer becomes his own grandfather.

Records from the Archdiocese of Louisiana and the Floridas between 1576-1803 are now Online

Another great resource is now available online: Records from the Archdiocese of Louisiana and the Floridas – 1576-1803.

The database contains two entries for each record: (1.) an image of the original hand-witten record in French and (2.) an image of an accompanying 3″ by 5″ index card that was created some years ago.

Famous Kin of Thomas Jefferson

Click on the above image to view the full sized infographic on the Crestview site.

Crestleaf has an interesting infographic that helps confirm the idea that everyone is related to most everyone else. The infographic shows many of the notable Americans who are related to Thomas Jefferson, ranging from George Washington to Paris Hilton.

Of course, millions of other, less notable, people are also related to Thomas Jefferson and, through him, to all the others shown in the Crestleaf infographic at http://goo.gl/6bS1Ai.

Proposed Elimination of the Genealogy Department at Indiana State Library

This could be a huge loss to genealogists: the new Indiana state budget bill proposes a 24% cut in funding to the Indiana State Library. This proposal would eliminate the Genealogy Department, as well as reduce the staff at ISL by 10%.

The Indiana Genealogical Society has posted information about this on their blog, and includes links to an analysis by the State Librarian, the contact info for the House Ways and Means Committee, and committee chair Rep. Timothy Brown. You can read more about the proposal at: http://indgensoc.blogspot.com/2015/01/proposed-elimination-of-genealogy-at.html.

My thanks to Amy Johnson Crow for telling me about this proposed loss to genealogists.

Is There Any Such Thing as a Half-Cousin?

One of my pet peeves is a term that I see online over and over: someone claiming to be a “half first cousin” or a “half second cousin once removed” or something similar. Sorry folks, but there is no such thing as a “half first cousin” according to legal dictionaries. However, the term is used by others. I know that lots of families use that term to refer to various relatives.

NOTE: I will describe references used in the U.S. It is possible that relations are described differently in other countries and especially in languages other than English.

Many people think that a “half first cousin” is someone who shares one grandparent with you but not both of them. For instance, my great-grandfather was married twice. He had several children by his first wife. The wife then died in childbirth, and great-grandfather later remarried and had more children by his second wife. I am descended from great-grandfather and his first wife. I recently met a man who is descended from my great-grandfather and his second wife. Some people would think that this other man and I are half-second cousins. “Half” apparently refers to the fact that we share only half the relationship because of our different great-grandmothers.

In fact, we are second cousins. Period.

Photos of UFOs Now Available from the National Archives and Records Administration

Click on the above image to view a larger, although still fuzzy, version.

For decades, the U.S. Air Force kept a record of all of its investigations into extraterrestrial activity in one extensive report called Project Blue Book. Up until last week, Project Blue Book’s massive catalog of over 10,000 UFO and extraterrestrial reports from the 1940s to the 1970s had only been accessible by visiting the National Archives in Washington. Now the archives are available online.

A South Texas Internment Camp for German-American Citizens during World War II

Click on the above image to view a Larger version.

The hardships endured by Japanese-Americans who suffered forced relocation and incarceration during World War II are well documented and well-known. The rationale is that these Americans of Japanese ancestry might have been spies. However, Japan was not the only nation at war with the United States and not the only nation to have sent emigrants to the United States.

Americans of German descent were also sent to internment camps. One thing I found interesting is that many of the detainees were pawns traded for “more important” Americans held behind enemy lines during and after the war.

Genealogy Roadshow, Season 2, Episode 2

Genealogy Roadshow aired earlier this evening. It was the second episode of the new season. Hosts Kenyatta D. Berry, Joshua Taylor and Mary Tedesco worked with guests in St. Louis to prove and disprove family stories handed down over the years and to make new discoveries for the guests.

This week’s episode was videotaped at the St. Louis Central Library and featured several interesting stories. The first story may have been the most interesting. It started with a family legend that a great-grandmother’s immigration from Italy was for an arranged marriage to an American cowboy from Wyoming. However, when she met the man, she didn’t like him. The Genealogy Roadshow researchers found that this story was like many other family stories: a kernel of truth that had been twisted and embellished over the years.

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