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(+) Convert 35mm Slides to Digital

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

I have hundreds of 35-millimeter slides stored in boxes. They might as well be shoeboxes although the boxes I use are a bit different size. I collected them over the past few decades and must admit I never looked at any of them again until recently. I find that storing slides or any photos or home movies in any inconvenient location means that they are rarely viewed again. Why did you or someone else spend all the money for cameras, film, and processing if no one ever looks at the results?

I will suggest the solution is to digitize the films and slides. Once digitized, the images are easy to view at any time and very easy to share with others. Your children, grandchildren, cousins, and other relatives might like to receive digital copies of pictures taken long ago. With today’s technology, that is easy to do.

Ancestor Cloud

A new start-up has quietly built a web site and is soliciting genealogists to be beta testers of the service. I admit I know almost nothing about the company and therefore cannot make any recommendations for or against the new site. However, it is interesting and you might want to take a look at the site for yourself.

Ancestor Cloud at http://www.ancestorcloud.com claims to be a “social genealogy” service. The home page states:

“Share publicly or privately

“Showcase your genealogy research to the world or select family and friends. AncestorCloud is a simple and secure place that helps you easily share your research files for free.

Genealogy Jamboree Call for Presentations Extended

The following announcement was written by the folks at the Southern California Genealogical Society:

Have you submitted for the Southern California Genealogical Society 46th Annual Southern California Genealogy Jamboree, to be held Friday through Sunday, June 5 – 7, 2015 at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Airport Hotel, Burbank, California? The Genetic Genealogy: DNA Plus! on Thursday, June 4, 2015 will include a full day of DNA presentations and In-Depth Workshops.

This Call for Presentations also includes the 2015 Jamboree Extension Series webinar program. This webinar program offers two sessions per month (the first Saturday and the third Wednesday) to an international audience.

The 2015 Southern California Genealogy Jamboree theme is Genealogy FANfare! celebrating the use of the friends, associates and neighbors (FANs) of our elusive ancestors in order to aid in our research.

How NOT to Store a Town’s Records

Smithtown, New York, may have learned an expensive lesson. Genealogists, historians, title search companies, attorneys, and more will also encounter difficulties because of improper storage of important documents. Tax files, birth and death certificates and other documents waterlogged from last month’s record rainfall may cost Smithtown hundreds of thousands of dollars to restore, officials said.

An estimated 301 boxes and 85 ledger books from the town clerk’s, assessor’s and comptroller’s offices were damaged in the Aug. 13 storm that dumped more than 13 inches of rain on parts of Long Island, said Smithtown Town Attorney Matthew Jakubowski. Several inches of water flooded the basement areas where the documents were stored.

First World War Records on TheGenealogist

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

Find records of injured First World War servicemen online for the first time

Over 1.3 million records from daily and weekly First World War casualty lists have been released online by TheGenealogist. This vast collection of unique records cover all ranks to help you discover more about your injured ancestor’s wartime service.

The new records include career soldiers, volunteer Pals battalions, war poets and even a future Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan. The collection covers both those who died of their wounds and those who recovered and returned to the front.

The records are a great resource for finding out what happened to an ancestor during The First World War. Details include:- the name of the injured serviceman, his regiment and rank, the date he was registered as a ‘casualty’ and often his home town or place of enlistment.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. If your email provider blocked it, don’t forget that the latest Plus Edition newsletter is ALWAYS available at: http://www.eogn.com/wp/thisweek.htm. Your email provider cannot block that address so the newsletter is always available to you.

Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) One Laptop, Two Computer Screens

(+) Carry Your Genealogy Database in Your Wristwatch

(+) Forget Smart Watches. Introducing the SmartRing!

Book Review: The Parrett Migration

Reminder: “Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.” Returns to PBS on Tuesday

Elephind: A Digital Newspaper Collections Search Engine

Convert an Address to Latitude and Longitude

Create a Custom Email Newsletter from Any Blog

How I Organize Evernote: A Peek Inside My Personal System

Department of Veterans Affairs Proposes to Build a Genealogy Database of 10 Million NEW Individual Genealogies Per Year

Elephind: A Digital Newspaper Collections Search Engine

Click on the above image to view a larger version.

Elephind is a great service that searches online digital newspaper collections. Best of all, it is available free of charge.

Elephind.com is a search engine that operates much like Google, Bing, and other search engines. The one thing that is different with Elephind is that it searches only historical, digitized newspapers. It enables you to search for free across many newspaper sites simultaneously rather than having to visit each collection’s web site separately.

At this time Elephind has indexed 2,677 newspaper titles containing more than two and a half million editions, ranging from March 1803 up to August 2013. The Elephind search engine has indexed 141,628,238 items from 2,677 newspaper titles. These include such well known sites as Chronicling America (the U.S.’s Library of Congress) and Trove (National Library of Australia), as well as smaller collections like Door County Library in Wisconsin. Many of the smaller newspaper sites are not well known and may be difficult to find with the usual search engines, but they are searchable from Elephind.com. A list of available newspaper collections that have been indexed so far is available at http://goo.gl/VRQN5l.

Additional newspaper collections are added to Elephind’s indexes frequently.

I found that Elephind operates in much the same manner as many other search engines. If you already know how to search for things in Google, Bing, Yahoo, or elsewhere, you already know how to use Elephind. In fact, there are two search methods available on Elephind:

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Genealogy Cruises, United Kingdom, Ontario, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

How I Organize Evernote: A Peek Inside My Personal System

A few weeks ago, I wrote a Plus Edition article entitled (+) My Method of Filing Digital Images and Documents. It is still available at http://eogn.com/wp/?p=32196. In the article, I described the system I use for organizing digital photographs and all sorts of other documents on my computer’s hard drive and in online backups.

I was planning to write a similar article about organizing all sorts of information within Evernote, one of the handiest programs available for genealogists and for millions of other computer users as well. However, when researching the article on the World Wide Web, I found that Michael Hyatt had already written an article about that and his methods are similar to my own. He doesn’t write about genealogy uses of Evernote but most of what he writes applies to genealogy as well as to thousands of other topics.

German Digital Church Book Portal is Now Online

Newsletter reader Ernie Thode wrote to say that an announcement of a new online site was made at the German national genealogy conference in Kassel on September 13. The beta test of the German digital church book portal is now available.

Of about 140,000 individual church books in Germany, the records of about 35,000 (25%) have been digitized thus far. Most of the German Protestant regional church bodies are participating, others and Catholic archives and civil registrations may be joining in later. There will be a fee.

I used Google Translate to display much of the introductory text in English. This may be an imperfect translation:

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies Now Online

Fold3.com has added a new title: the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies. Like its name suggests, this collection contains the two navies’ official reports, orders, and correspondence from the Civil War. If you’re interested in the Civil War, this is the go-to title for contemporary, first-hand information about the Northern and Southern navies.

Originally compiled by the Navy Department, the Official Records of the Navies are organized into two series: Series I, with 27 individual volumes, and Series II, with 3 volumes and an index. Series I documents all wartime operations of the two navies, while Series II deals with statistical data of Union and Confederate ships, letters of marque and reprisal, Confederate departmental investigations, Navy and State department correspondence, proclamations and appointments of President Davis, and more.

You can read more in an article by Trevor Hammond in the Fold3 Blog at http://blog.fold3.com/official-records-of-the-union-and-confederate-navies.

(+) Forget Smart Watches. Introducing the SmartRing!

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Five days ago, I published a Plus Edition article entitled, (+) Carry Your Genealogy Database in Your Wristwatch at http://eogn.com/wp/?p=32323. I described the miniaturization of computing devices, from mainframe computers of the 1960s that filled one or more rooms, to desktop personal computers, to laptops, to handheld tablets, and to today’s “smartphones” that are really powerful computers with built-in cell phones included. I described the use of a new high-tech wristwatch that is more powerful than the first iPhone. Now, only five days later, I found an article that proves the electronic devices are shrinking even further.

(+) One Laptop, Two Computer Screens

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

I must admit I have become accustomed to having two computer screens attached to my one computer at home. I have long used two 27-inch monitors connected to my one desktop computer. However, there is a problem when traveling: the tiny, single 11-inch screen on my laptop computer seems very constraining after using two side-by-side 27-inch monitors at home!

With both monitors on my desk at home, side by side, I can operate them as separate monitors or even create the illusion of one giant screen. I can open a website on one screen and a word processor on the other, then copy and paste from one screen to another. I can even open a spreadsheet and stretch it across the full width of both screens if I want. Why can’t I do that when in a hotel room? After watching my friend Kevin Grooms do exactly that, I was hooked. I started looking at portable external monitors.

Click on the above image to view a larger version.

More often than not, I have my favorite word processing program displayed on one screen while the second screen displays incoming email messages, a chat window, perhaps the local weather report, and whatever else I wish to monitor while seated at the computer. One of my friends displays the latest stock market quotes all day long on a second screen while he works at his office. You probably can find multiple uses of your own for two or even three monitors.

Reminder: “Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.” Returns to PBS on Tuesday

The latest genealogy-related television series will be broadcast this week on most PBS stations.

In the first episode of “Finding Your Roots,” to be broadcast this Tuesday, September 23, the subjects of the program will be horror novelist Stephen King, actor Courtney B. Vance and Canadian actress-singer Gloria Reuben.

King’s father walked out on his family when Stephen was two and never returned. Courtney Vance’s father committed suicide and Courtney was brought up in a foster home. Gloria Reuben’s father was 78 years old when she was born. When he died he took the secret of his ancestry with him, but not for good. Using genealogy and in some cases DNA, Gates helps each of them to discover family history they never knew. The program airs on PBS at 8 PM Eastern time. Check your local listings for the time and channel near you.

That Synthetic Food of the Future

Be cautious when predicting the future. Not all predictions are accurate. The following is from the Ogden Standard-Examiner of Ogden City, Utah, on September 19, 1926:

Click on the above image to view a larger version.

Flyleaf Press Acquired By Ancestor Network

The following announcement was written by the folks at Ancestor Network:

Flyleaf Press Acquired By Ancestor Network: A New Chapter in Irish Genealogy Publishing Begins
Announcements

19 September 2014

Dublin, Ireland, 19 September 2014. Ancestor Network Ltd., the leading Irish family history services company, announced today that it has acquired Flyleaf Press, the specialist Irish genealogy publisher.

Ancestor Network, the leading probate and genealogy services provider, has been at the forefront of the Irish family history market for over five years. It has provided genealogy advisory services for public visitors to the National Archives of Ireland, the National Library of Ireland, and the Kerry Genealogy Roadshow. It was the primary genealogy researcher for RTE’s ‘The Genealogy Roadshow’ and has successfully managed popular genealogy educational courses and events across Ireland such as the Brian Ború Millennium Festival in Clare, Tipperary, Galway and Dublin, and the Monaghan Genealogy ‘Home to the Little Hills’ Training courses.

Department of Veterans Affairs Proposes to Build a Genealogy Database of 10 Million NEW Individual Genealogies Per Year

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has issued a a combined synopsis/solicitation for commercial corporations to bid on building a huge genealogy database, starting first with persons with roots in Washington and Oregon. The goal is to create a Genealogy Medical Phenotype Resource Database.

The request is to create 10 million NEW individual genealogies per year in electronic format for persons with roots in Washington and Oregon. If successful, the project will be continued a second year to add 10 million more individual genealogies. The VA proposed the ultimate creation of a U.S. genealogy of 100-200 million individuals, linked to the entire VA system (25 million individuals). This service contract will last for three years, through the duration of the MERIT review grant.

Create a Custom Email Newsletter from Any Blog

Do you like to read a particular genealogy blog or perhaps any other sort of online blog? Do you sometimes forget to check that blog frequently to read new articles? Would you prefer to receive frequent email message when new articles are posted rather than having to take time to check the blog manually? Perhaps you write a blog but would like to send it to readers via email in addition to the online web site? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, there is a simple and easy solution for you.

Blogtrottr converts your favorite blog sites’ RSS newsfeeds into a scheduled email newsletter that you receive as often as you want, so you can stay on top of all the news.

Almost all blogs offer RSS newsfeeds, as do many news services, stock market reports, weather forecasting services, sports sites, and hundreds of other web sites. If an online site you wish to monitor offers an RSS newsfeed, you can use Blogtrottr to convert those RSS newsfeeds into email messages that are sent to you at the times you specify, ranging from every 2 hours to once a day. If there are no new articles posted in the timeframe you specify, Blogtrottr doesn’t send an email.

Book Review: The Parrett Migration

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The Parrett Migration.
by Dawn Parrett Thurston. Published by the author. 2014. 315 pages.

Ms. Thurston recites the story of her ancestor Joseph Frederick Parrett of Ohio, whose origins were in the Rhineland of Europe. His river journey took him out of the Old Country of the Switzerland region and across the sea to the port of Philadelphia. He and his families settled in the eastern states, moved into Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, on to eastern Tennessee, Fayette County Ohio, Locust Grove Iowa, and finally to California.

Ms. Thurston proceeds to chronicle their lives. She enhances the stories with detailed period cultural and geographic descriptions. She writes her stories with the authority of meticulous, scrupulous, and extensive research, shifting the storyline beyond genealogy into historical reporting of keen interest to us.

The Disadvantage of a Scottish Brogue

The Scots are a proud people. The are also fiercely proud of their accents. However, that accent can occasionally be a disadvantage, as shown in this YouTube video of two Scotsmen who are frustrated by an elevator that uses voice recognition. (Warning, some profanity is in the video.)

You can watch the video at http://youtu.be/PJj_nO46gq8 or in the video player below.

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