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Whisky & Haggis Crisps

Click on the above image to view a larger version.

This is a follow-up to the description of haggis, neeps and tatties that I published a few days ago at http://goo.gl/LMF0lA. Today, I discovered that MacKie’s of Scotland also sells Ridge Cut Whisky & Haggis Potato Crisps (that’s potato chips to Americans) as well as Haggis & Cracked Black Pepper Crisps. Is nothing sacred? Haggis potato chips… er, crisps?

I assumed these crisps are available in the U.K. but was surprised to learn that Americans can purchase MacKie’s Haggis & Cracked Black Pepper Crisps from Amazon although at a high price: $49.99 for a pack of 12 5.3-ounce bags. There is no mention on Amazon of the Whisky & Haggis Potato Crisps, however.

New England Genealogical Society Has Offered to be the Repository for Armenian Genealogical History

The following was written by the The New England Historic Genealogical Society:

The New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) on Newbury St. in Boston has offered to be the repository for Armenian genealogical history—that is, to accept materials (family trees, letters, oral histories) from the Armenian community in New England relating to family history and genealogy.

Founded in 1845, the NEHGS is the country’s founding genealogical organization and a leading national resource for family history research. NEHGS offers access to unique content, publications, research materials, expert staff, and vast collections of rare artifacts and primary documents. The NEHGS website (www.AmericanAncestors.org) includes several searchable databases of Armenian births, marriages, and deaths in Massachusetts between 1880 and 1915. These useful databases were compiled by William A. Brown, the former U.S. ambassador to Israel and to Thailand, and are available for free on the NEHGS website.

NEHGS is hoping that New England Armenian-American genealogical materials will soon be added to its impressive collections of New England Irish-American materials, New England African-American materials, and New England Jewish-American materials.

Book Review: The Veterans Cemetery. Esquimalt, British Columbia. God’s Acre.

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The Veterans Cemetery. Esquimalt, British Columbia. God’s Acre.
Compiled and edited by Harvey A. Buckmaster. Published by the Victoria Genealogical Society, Victoria, BC. Revised and updated 2014 Edition. 230 pages.

The Veteran’s Cemetery, known as God’s Acre, has been magnificently transcribed and re-published by the Victoria Genealogical Society, following a previously published volume in 2000.

The compilers have recorded marker transcriptions exactly as inscribed on the tombstones, with additional Notes added by the compilers to include additional genealogical information such as birth and death dates when available and not included on the markers.

St Louis No. 1 Cemetery in New Orleans to be Closed to All but Licensed Tour Groups

The Archdiocese of New Orleans announced this morning that as of March 1, 2015, visitors to St. Louis No. 1 Cemetery will be permitted only if accompanied by a licensed guide. The reason cited is increasing vandalism.

The Archdiocese of New Orleans says allowances will be made for families who own tombs within the cemetery, but this edict effectively closes out genealogists from this historically rich source of information. There are plans to do the same in the St. Louis No. 3 and St. Roch cemeteries.

GRIP has a New Registration Procedure

The following announcement was written by the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP):

GRIP is Utilizing a New Technological Registration Procedure

Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) is a very popular “summer camp for genealogists” that is held on the campus of La Roche College, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Last year 205 students from 40 states and 3 countries attended six courses in Pittsburgh. Having fun while learning about genealogy in the company of friends and like-minded classmates is why students return year after year. Not to mention the course coordinators and instructors who are tops in the field! GRIP is happy to provide two separate weeks for learning opportunities this summer, each with its own opening registration date.

Preserve Your Family Documents and Photos at RootsTech 2015

RootsTech 2015 will be a 3-day event offering more than 200 classes; an expo hall of hundreds of exhibitors and sponsors, including interactive booths to assist in your family history journey; general sessions with well-known and inspiring speakers; and entertaining events at the end of each day. See my earlier article at http://goo.gl/c4c7uC for details.

One vendor in this year’s exhibits hall, EZ Photo-Scan, is inviting all attendees to bring their family pictures, documents, and any memorabilia that can be digitized, for free scanning on site.

Virtual Genealogy Conference Debuts a New DNA Track

Family Tree University has announced an online conference and has even included a special early bird offer for readers of this newsletter. The following was written by the folks at F+W Media, Inc., sponsors of Family Tree University:

Family Tree University’s Winter 2015 Virtual Conference adds Genetic Genealogy sessions to presentation lineup

For a fraction of the cost it takes to travel to—and attend—a live event, Family Tree University’s Winter 2015 Virtual Conference provides attendees with an all-access pass to 15 half-hour video sessions, allowing you to learn from popular genealogy speakers from the comfort of home. And now, FTU is excited to announce the debut of a Genetic Genealogy track.

NGS Awards Deadline Approaching: January 31

The following was written by the (U.S.) National Genealogical Society:

Arlington, VA, 26 JANUARY 2015: Each year, the National Genealogical Society recognizes excellence within the genealogy field through a number of awards. The deadline for several of these awards—January 31—is quickly approaching. NGS encourages its members, member societies, and other organizations to review the requirements and make submissions. Winners will be recognized at the NGS Family History Conference, to be held May 13-16, 2015 in St. Charles, Missouri.

The following NGS awards have a deadline of January 31:

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. If your email provider blocked it, don’t forget that the latest Plus Edition newsletter is ALWAYS available at: http://www.eogn.com/wp/thisweek.htm. Your email provider cannot block that address so the newsletter is always available to you.

Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) How to become a Paid Genealogy Speaker

(+) Internet Archive Wants to Store Everything, Including Books

Both the RootsTech 2015 and FGS 2015 Conferences will be Held on February 11–14

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech/FGS Conference in Salt Lake City

January 25 is Robert Burns Day So Let’s Eat Vegetarian Haggis

Is There Any Such Thing as a Half-Cousin?

Genealogy Roadshow, Season 2, Episode 2

Amazon Kindle Textbook Creator

(+) Internet Archive Wants to Store Everything, Including Books

The following Plus Edition article is written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

What does a library look like anymore?

When Egyptian King Ptolemy I built the Library of Alexandria nearly 2,300 years ago, the great library became the intellectual center of the ancient world. Ptolemy hoped to gather as much human knowledge as possible. Even ships anchored in the port were impounded until all the manuscripts they contained could be copied. World leaders lent their scrolls for duplication, and library officials traveled far and wide to purchase entire collections. Meanwhile, dutiful scribes hand-copied the library’s awesome collection, which eventually grew to as many as 700,000 scrolls.

Brewster Kahle is a modern-day Ptolemy: he wants to ensure universal access to all human knowledge. And now he thinks that goal is within our grasp. In fact, his web site, called The Internet Archive, has already stored 430 billion web pages. Yes, that’s BILLIONS of web pages. However, this online archive has a lot more than just web pages. It serves as an online library, the largest such library in the world. People download 20 million books from the site each month. This online library gets more visitors in a year than most libraries do in a lifetime.

Both the RootsTech 2015 and FGS 2015 Conferences will be Held on February 11–14

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and RootsTech are teaming up for a one-time special genealogy event at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, February 11–14, 2015. You can attend not one, but two, major genealogy conferences at the same time. If you can be in Salt Lake City those days, you won’t want to miss this event. It undoubtedly will be the largest genealogy gathering of the year in North America.

NOTE: I will be at the conferences also and will be hosting a dinner for readers of this newsletter on Saturday evening. I’ll write about the dinner in a separate article.

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech/FGS Conference in Salt Lake City

Do you think you will be hungry after the RootsTech/FGS Conference in Salt Lake City? Would you like to have dinner with a large group of genealogists? If so, join us for dinner! You are invited to join other genealogists on Saturday evening after the RootsTech 2015 conference for dinner. Rumor has it there will also be a few door prizes.

This dinner will be held at 7:30 PM, immediately after the close of the RootsTech/FGS 2015 Conference on February 14. You are invited whether you subscribe to the newsletter or not. Bring your friends and family also.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of previous events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

94-year-old Can’t File Tax Return because IRS Says He’s Dead

Apparently not every bit of information in the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) is accurate. There is a 94-year-old World War II vet in Ohio who just wants to pay his taxes but can’t because the IRS says he’s dead.

Siegfried Meinstein has been unable to convince the IRS he is alive, living in an assisted living facility near Columbus, Ohio. The IRS has told the nonagenarian it can’t process his tax return because their records indicate he is deceased.

January 25 is Robert Burns Day So Let’s Eat Vegetarian Haggis

The great Scottish poet Robert Burns was born January 25, 1759. In celebration of his birthday, Burns Suppers range from formal gatherings of esthetes and scholars to very informal dinners throughout Scotland and in restaurants and the homes of Scottish descendants worldwide. Most Burns Suppers adhere, more or less, to some sort of time honored form which includes the eating of a traditional Scottish meal, the drinking of Scotch whisky, and the recitation of works by, about, and in the spirit of the Bard.

NOTE: American and Irish liquor producers spell it as WHISKEY, while Canadian, Scottish, and Japanese producers usually spell it without an “e”: WHISKY.

Almost anyone can enjoy a Burns Night celebration. All that’s needed is a place to gather, plenty of haggis and neeps to go around, a master of ceremonies, friendly celebrants, and good Scotch drink to keep you warm.

2015 FGS Conference Early Registration Discount Extended Until Monday, January 26

If you missed the deadline, you have until Monday to register. The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:

2015 FGS Conference Early registration discount Extended

January 23, 2015 – Austin, TX. The early registration discount for the 2015 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference has been extended to midnight (MST), Monday, January 26. This extension allows three more days to register at $159 for the full four days of the conference coming up February 11–14 in Salt Lake City, Utah in conjunction with RootsTech.

(+) How to become a Paid Genealogy Speaker

The following Plus Edition article is written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Ah, the glamorous life: flying from city to city, giving presentations before genealogy conferences and society meetings. How would you like to do the same?

Amazon Kindle Textbook Creator

A new product from Amazon to create Kindle ebooks has the word “Textbook” in its name but it appears to work for all sorts of books. Of course, I am thinking about genealogy books. The new software appears to be an extension to the already-available Kindle Direct Publishing application.

Kindle Textbook Creator even makes it easy to transform PDFs into an e-book format. I haven’t used the product yet but hope to do so soon. I noticed that Amazon claims its Textbook Creator offers a simple way to organize an array of educational materials — graphs, equations, charts or anything else you might find in a textbook.

Best of all, Kindle Textbook Creator is available free of charge for Windows and Macintosh. The books can be read on all sorts of devices, including Amazon’s Kindles, of course, as well as iPads, iPhones or Android devices.

NTIS Extends Comments Period for Proposed Changes to the Certification for Access to the Death Master File (DMF)

The Death Master File, or DMF, is better known to genealogists as the SDSDI or Social Security Death Index. The National Technical Information Service (NTIS) has proposed new rules that will, if implemented, create a certification program to replace the temporary certification program currently in place for access to the DMF. The result will create an expensive impediment to genealogists attempting to learn more about their ancestors.

For more information, see my earlier articles at http://goo.gl/vq5fSF and at http://goo.gl/U7MJLs.

I’m My Own Grandpa

Some of the readers’ comments following my recent article of Is There Any Such Thing as a Half-Cousin? at http://goo.gl/j4y3q1 described some complex relationships. The comments include stories of “double first cousins,” children who are simultaneously siblings as well as cousins, and more. All of this reminds me of a popular song from the 1940s called I’m My Own Grandpa.

The song was written by Dwight Latham and Moe Jaffe, performed by Lonzo and Oscar in 1947, about a man who, through an unlikely (but legal) combination of marriages, becomes stepfather to his own stepmother. The song pays no attention to the prefix “step-” however. As a result, the singer becomes his own grandfather.

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