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(+) My Favorite Way to Easily Save Cell Phone Photos

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman.

I have more than 3,000 photos and videos stored in my cell phone. That includes pictures of my grandchildren, photos from genealogy conferences, images of old documents found in various archives, recipes that I “photo-copied” from magazines, bills, receipts, and even a few billboards I enjoyed and decided to save.

Of course, I want to copy all of these items to one or more cloud-based services as well as to my own computers for long-term storage and preservation. Over the past year or two, I have experimented with programs that copy photos from a cell phone to Amazon Cloud Drive (Amazon Prime members can upload unlimited photos free of charge), Google Drive (free of charge for up to 15 gigabytes), Dropbox (free of charge for up to 2 gigabytes), Copy.com (up to 15 gigabytes free of charge), and several other services.

AncestryDNA will now Display Your DNA Matches in a Whole New Way with Shared Matches

AncestryDNA just released a new matching tool called Shared Matches. This new tool will help you see your matches in a whole new way, giving you clues about the common ancestor that may have given both you and your match the DNA you share today. And as a bonus, if you have had a parent tested, you now can see which matches you have in common with them using the mother or father filter.

The Shared Matches tool will show you which matches you and any given match on your list share in common. You can use this new tool to help narrow down your matches to a particular side of your family. It’s especially helpful if you’ve had a parent tested because once you have a parent tested, you’ll see a new filter at the top of your match list that lets you find the DNA matches that you share with your mom or dad.

Help Wanted: Front-End Developer at Geni

Are you an experienced programmer with knowledge of JavaScript, including jQuery and Backbone.js, HTML5, CSS, Sprockets, Sass, Ruby and the Rails Framework? Would you like a job in Burbank, California? A knowledge of genealogy probably would help as well.

Geni, a division of MyHeritage, is hiring. The help wanted ad may be found at http://goo.gl/cAqV5L.

 

We Are All Related! So Get Over It.

Hillary_Clinton_Donald_TrumpPolitics are saturating the U.S. news media once again as candidates vie for the presidential elections, still more than a year away. Every four years, news services “discover” that various candidates are related to one another. This week’s news is that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are 19th cousins. Their common ancestors include John of Gaunt, the duke of Lancaster, and third wife Katherine Swynford at the end of the 14th century — a century before Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

I have one reaction: “Ho hum, so what else is new?”

14 Volumes of Genealogical Lists of Irish-Jewish Families Presented to Dublin City

Fourteen rare volumes of genealogical lists of Irish-Jewish families in Ireland were presented to Dublin City Council’s Library and Archive today. The volumes were gifted by Stuart Rosenblatt, President of the Genealogical Society of Ireland. The set of 14 volumes presented by Stuart to the people of Dublin at Dublin City Library & Archive, is one of only five sets, and therefore is of immense rarity.

The Hunt for Heirs of a Photographer’s Collection Potentially Worth Millions

Vivian_MaierHere is a genealogy story in the making. Vivian Maier was an amateur street photographer whose brilliant work catapulted her to worldwide fame only after her death. The negatives of her photographs are now probably worth millions. Vivian had no children so the fortune should go to her closest relative: her long-lost brother Charles. However, he died nearly 40 years ago in a small town in central New Jersey. It is unknown if he had any children.

Genealogist Ann Marks, a former executive at Dow Jones & Co., said she hoped that going public with the information would prompt those who may have known Charles to come forward and shed more light on the Maier family history, perhaps staving off what could be a protracted legal fight in the slow-moving probate court. “To me the search to find heirs is as interesting as Vivian herself,” Marks, 57, said from her Long Island home.

Board for Certification of Genealogists Welcomes Five Trustees – Two New and Three Re-Elected

The following announcement was written by the Board for Certification of Genealogists:

bcg-logoReturning for another three-year term as trustees of the Board for Certification of Genealogists are:

  • Alison Hare, CG, of Ottawa, Ontario. She has been certified since 1999. She presented a lecture on the 1854 London cholera epidemic at this year’s National Genealogical Society conference.
  • Debra S. Mieszala, CG, of Libertyville, Illinois. She has been certified since 2002. She blogs at “The Advancing Genealogist” and specializes in forensic genealogy, 20th-century research, and the Midwest.
  • Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, of Avenel, New Jersey. She has been certified since 2012, serves on the executive committee this year as member-at-large, and speaks at conferences coast to coast.

Genealogy Jamboree 2016 Call for Presentations

The following announcement was written by the organizers of the 47th Annual Southern California Genealogy Jamboree:

The Southern California Genealogical Society announces its Call for Presentations for the 47th Annual Southern California Genealogy Jamboree, to be held Friday through Sunday, June 3 – 5, 2016 with a pre-conference day on Thursday, June 2, 2016, to include a full day of DNA presentations and in-depth workshops, at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Airport Hotel, Burbank, California. This call also includes the 2016 Jamboree Extension Series webinar program. Presentations will only be accepted through the online portal August 20 – September 30, 2015.

Genealogy Jamboree draws family historians and genealogists at all experience levels, from the beginner to the professional; from the first time conference attendee to conference veterans. The Jamboree Extension Series draws an international audience also comprised of all skill levels.

Ancestry Collaborates with Gannett to Digitally Archive More Than 80 U.S. Newspapers

The following announcement was written by Ancestry.com:

Cincinnati Enquirer the First Gannett Archive Launched with Over 4 Million Pages Online

PROVO, Utah, Aug 24, 2015 — Ancestry, the leader in family history and consumer genetics, today announced its collaboration with Gannett Co., Inc., the largest local-to-national media company, to digitize more than 80 daily newspapers across the nation. Newspapers.com, an Ancestry business unit, and Gannett will provide a historical newspaper viewing experience complete with full text search, clipping and sharing features. Together, they expect to deliver more than 100 million full-page images of historical newspapers in a simple, easy-to-use online archive.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few hours ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) The True Expense of Genealogy Research
(+) A Lesson to be Learned From One Library’s Conversion to a Digital Library
Wanted to Rent: New Home for 19,000 Arizona Genealogy Research Documents
eBook: Sources for Genealogical Research at the Austrian War Archives in Vienna (Kriegsarchiv Wien)
Requesting Public Records? Depending on the State, That Could Cost Money
Ancestral Quest is Now Available for Macintosh
Scottish Ancestral Research Company Releases New Records for Major Family History Show
More than 82,000 FamilySearch Volunteers “Fuel the Find” for People Worldwide
FamilySearch opens a new Seattle Family Discovery Center
New FamilySearch Collections: Week of August 17, 2015
New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday
Introducing SNAC
Announcing the Launch of new Website for the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (AGRA)
Certificate of Irish Heritage Abandoned
New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) Announces Appointment of Christopher C. Child as Editor of the Mayflower Descendant
Do Not Install Dictation Software on Your Windows or Macintosh Computer!
Run Windows Programs on your Macintosh with Parallels Desktop
Millionaire Property Developer Used Children’s Gravestones to Build a Patio
Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events
(+) The True Expense of Genealogy Research

(+) A Lesson to be Learned From One Library’s Conversion to a Digital Library

Wanted to Rent: New Home for 19,000 Arizona Genealogy Research Documents

eBook: Sources for Genealogical Research at the Austrian War Archives in Vienna (Kriegsarchiv Wien)

Requesting Public Records? Depending on the State, That Could Cost Money

Ancestral Quest is Now Available for Macintosh

Scottish Ancestral Research Company Releases New Records for Major Family History Show

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Ontario, Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and Texas

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

(+) The True Expense of Genealogy Research

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

The recent story about the closing of the Arizona State Library Genealogy Collection is sad news. (See my earlier article at http://goo.gl/pzZ0YI for details.) However, in this case, I have to agree with Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan. If a valuable resource at a taxpayer-supported public library is being used less and less, managers of that library need to re-evaluate where the funds are being spent. Libraries are under constant financial pressure. They obviously need to spend their meager budgets in ways to obtain the “most bang for the buck.”

In fact, Michele Reagan is correct. Anyone with a computer can now obtain more genealogy information online that what any public library in a town or a small city can provide. In fact, the computer probably can provide more genealogy information than what was in the Arizona State Library Genealogy Collection in Phoenix with the obvious exception of quite a bit of Arizona-specific information that is not available elsewhere and even that can be fixed by having those specific materials digitized at an expense that is probably much less than keeping the “bricks and mortar” library open.

Scottish Ancestral Research Company Releases New Records for Major Family History Show

The following announcement was written by the folks at Scottish Indexes:

Annan, Scotland – To celebrate the “Lanarkshire Family History Society Local and Family History Show” (the largest family history show in Scotland) www.scottishindexes.com is releasing thousands of historical Scottish paternity records. The total number of paternity records now indexed is 11,723!

These records give a unique insight into the lives of our ancestors and allows people with illegitimate ancestors to trace their male line more easily; often helping you overcome a ‘brick wall’ in your family tree!

FamilySearch opens a new Seattle Family Discovery Center

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

High-tech “Museum of You” concept for center guides visitors to discover, share, and preserve their histories and memories.

BELLEVUE, WA—FamilySearch International announces the grand opening of its Seattle Family Discovery Center, the first to open outside its headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah. Based in Bellevue, the center offers interactive experiences for visitors of all ages to discover, share, and preserve family histories and memories. It is free to the public. Find out more online at FamilySearch.org/discoverycenter/seattle.

At the Seattle Discovery Center in Bellevue, Washington, Trace Farmer of Seattle, Washington, discovers 4,586 people share his first name while using the “Discover My Story” experience.

At the Seattle Discovery Center in Bellevue, Washington, Trace Farmer of Seattle, Washington, discovers 4,586 people share his first name while using the “Discover My Story” experience.

Visitors to the center are provided with a tablet computer as a personal guide to interface with large touch screens, where they learn more about themselves, view family origins, and discover how ancestors may have lived and even dressed. Data used for the interactive experiences is drawn from online data at FamilySearch.org and select partners.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of fascinating Probate Calendars containing more than 100 years of English and Welsh wills. Additional birth, marriage and death records have also been added to our collection of Hertfordshire parish records.

Probate Calendars of England & Wales 1858-1959

Containing over 500,000 records, the Probate Calendars of England & Wales 1858-1959 record the details of wills lodged with the National Probate Registry. Until 1858, matters of probate were dealt with by the ecclesiastical courts of the Church of England. After 1858 the civil government took over the settlement of all estates and all wills were now probated through the Principal Probate Registry system. There were 11 district registry offices with 18 sub-district registries located around England and Wales, with the principal office located in First Avenue House, London. The calendars will reveal if your ancestor left a will or was mentioned in one. They may also reveal the size of the estate in question and list the will’s executors or administrators. The executors/administrator may have been a bank, solicitor, beneficiary or a family member, providing you with links to other branches of your family tree and new avenues to explore. Once you’ve found your ancestor in the index you can use the information listed to request a copy of the will from the National Probate Registry.

Announcing the Launch of new Website for the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (AGRA)

The following announcement was written by the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives:

AGRAlogo_largeMost people researching their family will need a little expert help from time to time. Finding a reliable professional genealogist in England and Wales has just become a whole lot easier thanks to the redesigned AGRA website at www.agra.org.uk.

AGRA (the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives) was established in 1968 to represent genealogy professionals in England and Wales, and to maintain and promote the highest standards of work in this field. Although the Association has had a website for many years, it has now had a complete make-over.

New FamilySearch Collections: Week of August 17, 2015

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

Fun FamilySearch additions to the Colombia, France, Peru, and Philippines international collections this week including significant digital images for Colombia Catholic Church Records from 1600 to 2012. Significant additions were also made to the Texas and Wisconsin marriage collections.  Over 7 million searchable records have been added this week. Follow the links below to explore the new content!

COLLECTION

INDEXED
RECORDS

DIGITAL
RECORDS

COMMENTS

Colombia Catholic Church Records 1600-2012

0

1,002,173

Added images to an existing collection

France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records
1772-1863

144,443

0

Added images to an existing collection

Illinois Adams County Card Index to Deaths 1877-1990

95,523

96,875

Added images to an existing collection

Peru Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996

862,440

304

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Philippines
Manila Civil Registration 1899-1984

0

4,088,394

Added images to an existing collection

Philippines Pangasinan Civil Registration 1945-1981

84,935

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Texas County Marriage Records 1837-1977

586,960

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Census 1890

15

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Obituaries American Historical Society of Germans
from Russia 1899-2012

0

4,154

Added images to an existing collection

Wisconsin County Marriages 1836-1911

213,905

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Run Windows Programs on your Macintosh with Parallels Desktop

Do you want to switch to a Macintosh for reliability reasons but hesitate to do so because you want to keep some of your Windows programs? Many Windows programs do have Macintosh equivalents (Word and Excel for both platforms), Calendar programs (replace Outlook with iCal), desktop publishing (replace Microsoft Publisher with Apple Pages), photo editing (Adobe Photoshop is available for both platforms), and dozens of other equivalents. However, maybe there is that one certain Windows program that you like that does not have an exact clone on the Mac. Perhaps your favorite genealogy program does not have a Mac version. What can you do?

Parallels_11

Run the Windows program on the Macintosh!

Certificate of Irish Heritage Abandoned

CertificateofIrishHeritageThe Certificate of Irish Heritage was perhaps a good idea even though it always was a bit controversial. It was basically a scheme for the Irish government to raise a bit of money from Irish descendants around the world. The certificates were issued to descendants of Irish citizens who don’t qualify for Irish citizenship themselves, but are willing to pay up €40 (about $44.50 US) for a piece of paper to prove their Irish roots, or €120 (about $133 US) with a frame.

Requesting Public Records? Depending on the State, That Could Cost Money

This will be an issue for genealogists. Tennessee may become the latest state to start charging a fee for the time it takes to fulfill a public records request, a practice that’s emerging in some states and one that opponents say simply aims to discourage requests.

This fall, the Tennessee Office of Open Record Counsel will conduct several public hearings on charging a fee for the search and retrieval of public records. While the state can already charge for copies of public records, inspection is generally free. But earlier this year, the state’s School Board Association pushed legislation proposing an hourly labor charge for public records request (with no charge for the first hour of labor). The legislation, which was tabled until next year, also stipulated that the first 25 copies would be free.

The Tennessee Coalition for Open Government and the state press association vehemently opposed the legislation.

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