The British Newspaper Archive Starts Digitising Eight New Titles

The following announcement was written by the folks at The British Newspaper Archive:

More than 8 million newspaper pages from 1710-1954 are now available to search at The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

In the last month, the website has started digitising the newspaper archives of eight new titles. These cover England, Scotland and Northern Ireland and include the London Evening Standard, Glasgow’s Daily Record and the Northern Whig.

The first years from the following new titles have been added to The British Newspaper Archive:

  • Biggleswade Chronicle, covering 1912
  • Daily Record, covering 1914-1915
  • Lake’s Falmouth Packet and Cornwall Advertiser, covering 1864
  • London Evening Standard, covering 1860-1862 and 1866-1867
  • Newcastle Evening Chronicle, covering 1915
  • Northern Whig, covering 1869-1870
  • Surrey Comet, covering 1854-1857 and 1859-1870
  • Watford Observer, covering 1864-1865, 1867, 1869-1870

You’ll find more information and links to these new additions at http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/2014/08/07/8-new-titles-including-the-london-evening-standard/.

About the British Newspaper Archive

The British Newspaper Archive is a partnership project between the British Library and DC Thomson Family History (formally known as brightsolid online publishing). From November 2011 to 2021, up to 40 million pages from historical newspapers across the UK and Ireland will be uploaded to the website www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection.

3 Comments

Dick, you probably want to mention that there is a fee for accessing all of this data. It’s cheaper than going to the British Library, but it’s also a case of the things that people own being sold back to them. If TFH weren’t willing to put up the cash, it wouldn’t be getting done. Maybe my local library will license the database so I can read it; it’s not the kind of thing I would use very often, but there are plenty of genealogists who might use it once a month at the library.

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    Most major collections of specialized data do require fees. As you stated, it is almost always cheaper than going to the archive in person.

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    The British Newspaper Archive is a wonderful collection and I’ve been happy to pay to access it. But it’s worth noting that the BNA collection is also accessible through FindMyPast (.co.uk), which is also owned by DC Thomson Family History, although understandably the search engine for locating articles is not so good on FindMyPast as it is on the BNA website. However, some public libraries in the UK provide free access to findmypast.co.uk.

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