Posts By Dick Eastman

Troy (New York) Irish Genealogy Society Adds Marriage Notices Appearing in Lansingburgh Newspapers 1787 – 1895

The following announcement was written by the Troy (New York) Irish Genealogy Society:

An index to 2,712 marriage notices covering 5,424 names that were published in ten different Lansingburgh, New York newspapers from 1787 to 1895 was created by staff at the Troy Public Library in 1938 through 1939. The Troy Irish Genealogy Society was allowed by the Troy Library to scan this book so these important records could be made available on-line for genealogy researchers. To see these records go to the TIGS website – www.troyirish.com – click on PROJECTS and then click on MARRIAGE NOTICES APPEARING IN LANSINGBURGH NEWSPAPERS.

Lansingburgh, by the way, for those not in the Capital District Region, was the first chartered village in Rensselaer County and was settled around 1763. In 1900 Lansingburgh became part of the City of Troy, New York.

The ten different Lansingburgh newspapers were:

Drouin Institute adds to its Repertory of Vital Events

The following announcement was written by the Drouin Institute, a well-known provider of French-Canadian data:

A year ago, the Programme de recherche en démographie historique (PRDH) of the Université de Montréal proudly announced that the Drouin Institute (IGD) (http://www.drouininstitute.com/) was now the editor for the public use of the PRDH data put together for the needs of University research. We had then written that this new development, qualified as “a welcome marriage between genealogy and university research”, would certainly lead to new initiatives, favourable for both researchers and the general public.

Here is a striking example of what we meant! We are adding today to the Repertory of Vital Events on our site the 1 700 000 baptisms, marriages and burials for the period 1800-1849 obtained from the IGD who did the data extracting for the baptisms and burials and of the Protestant marriages and made it available for university research, the marriages coming from the Balsac project at the Université du Québec à Chicoutimi.

The Connecticut Library Association’s Rally for Libraries

The genealogy community relies on our public libraries, especially those with terrific genealogy divisions and clubs. The new Connecticut proposed budget would eliminate the funding for interlibrary loan, consortia, grants for special programs and collections (like genealogy and local history), etc. Several years have seen proposals like this, but this battle is seen as the most dire.

The following is a “call for action” issued by the Connecticut Library Association:

As you know, Connecticut libraries are reeling from the news that the governor’s recent budget proposes to eliminate all state funding for Cooperating Library Service Units (CLC) as well as funding for Connecticard, Grants to Public Libraries, and more. In addition, there is a proposal to eliminate the state statutes that authorize and support these programs.

We need your help now to make sure the budget that is recommended in April by the Appropriations Committee includes full funding for CLC, Connecticard and Grants to Public Libraries.

What can you do to help?

Co-founder of Ancestry.com Charged with Sexually Abusing Teen

Sad news. A person who once was a well known person in the genealogy community had criminal charges filed Monday against him. However, I believe Dan Taggart has not been associated with Ancestry.com in any way for several years.

Details may be found in an article in the Deseret News at http://goo.gl/pilqaT.

(+) The Web as We Knew it is Dead. Long Live the Web!

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Are you using the latest and most convenient technology available today? Or are you using an ancient Windowsaurus (an old personal computing device from the paleo-Vista era)?

The history of the Internet began with the development of electronic computers in the 1950s. The US Department of Defense awarded contracts as early as the 1960s for packet network systems, including the development of the ARPANET (which would become the first network to use the Internet Protocol). Numerous people worked to connect computers together in a collaborative manner. Early examples include ARPANET, Mark I at NPL in the UK, CYCLADES, Merit Network, Tymnet, and Telenet. All were developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s using a variety of communications protocols.

Book Review: BarbwireDigi’s Guide to Creating A Digital Genealogy Scrapbook

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

BarbwireDigi’s Guide to Creating A Digital Genealogy Scrapbook
By Barb Groth
89 ppg. Published by BarbwireDigi/Barb Groth

Word has it that there was an emphasis on storytelling at the FGS/RootsTech conference this year.

To assist the genealogist who is ready to publish, there is an abundance of “How-To” guidebooks out there on the market. I’d say it’s a good idea to determine exactly where you’re at in your abilities to publish, then buy a guidebook suited to your immediate needs.

Ms. Groth has published a guide for creating a digital scrapbook, specifically targeted for the users of Adobe Photoshop© Elements. This program is an excellent photo-editing software for many genealogists, most especially for beginners. It’s fairly easy to learn, and does an excellent job of preparing photos for viewing and publication, adequately meeting the needs of most of us. Besides removing red-eye and cropping photos, I use photo-editing software to enhance contrast and modify light values on fuzzy scanned documents for improved readability and clarity. And, most importantly, Elements is affordable.

Announcing the 2016 ASG Scholar Award

The following announcement was written by the American Society of Genealogists:

Established in 1996, the ASG Scholar Award is an annual scholarship now providing an increased stipend of $1,000 toward tuition and expenses at one of three major academic genealogical programs in the United States. Candidacy for the award is open to all genealogists, genealogical librarians, and researchers working in related fields. Applicants submit a published work or a manuscript of work in progress, to be judged by a panel of three Fellows. The goal of the award is to recognize talent and build genealogical expertise by providing promising genealogists the opportunity to receive advanced academic training in genealogy.

Who Owns Your Genealogy Data?

Overheard at a genealogy conference recently (repeated from memory so the wording might not be exact):

Person #1: “I won’t put my genealogy information online because I am afraid someone might steal it.”

Person #2: “Where did you obtain all that information?”

Person #1: “From freely available public records, including census records, birth and death records, newspapers, and such.”

OK, now let me add my own comments and questions: All of those records are always available to everyone else. What is person #1 trying to hide?

Angie Harmon featured on Who Do You Think You Are? Sunday on TLC

The U.S. version of Who Do You Think You Are? continues this Sunday as Angie Harmon sets out to discover the roots of her beloved father, whose heritage is relatively vague.

On her journey, Angie uncovers the dramatic story of her five-times great grandfather, who endured hardship and danger as an immigrant coming to America. She discovers that he fought in the American Revolution and risked death for standing his ground. She makes modern connections with some of her own values that appear to have been in the family for generations.

Key details discovered in Angie’s episode include:

Secrets of London’s Infamous Bedlam Mental Hospital Revealed at Findmypast

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

  • Findmypast is working with Bethlem Museum of the Mind at Bethlem Royal Hospital, in London, UK, popularly known as Bedlam, to make its extensive patient records from 1683 – 1932 available online for the very first time
  • Over 248,000 records, many including photos, reveal the lives and stories of its inmates
  • Highlights of the detailed records show why people were committed included stabbing people with cutlery, insatiable appetite for pleasure, condemnation of sinful behaviour from public officials, objecting to a forced marriage, religious fervour, paralysis, women dressing as men and moreLondon, UK, 19 March 2015 – Leading family history website, Findmypast, today announced an exciting partnership with Bethlem Museum of the Mind to release Bethlem Royal Hospital’s extensive patient records online for the very first time. The records are being released today to mark the official reopening of the museum in Beckenham, with Findmypast making scans of the original patient case notes and staff registers available online for browsing and searching by everyone.

Milford (Michigan) Times Obituary Index 1929-1949 is now Online

One of the earliest newspapers in the State of Michigan, the Milford Times was the premiere newspaper in the Huron Valley area. The newspaper is still in publication and has always included news from Milford, Michigan, and many of the surrounding communities, including Highland Township, Commerce Townhip, White Lake Township, Hartland, Hickory Ridge, Wixom, Clyde, Walled Lake, Novi, and New Hudson. Now the obituaries from 1929 through 1949 have been indexed and made available online. The index is available at http://milfordlibrary.info/find-information/milford-times-obituary-request.

The Milford Public Library also won a grant for digitizing the paper. Details may be found at http://goo.gl/pA48Wm.

Genetic Study Reveals 30% of White British DNA has German Ancestry

The Romans, Vikings and Normans may have ruled or invaded the British for hundreds of years, but they left barely a trace on our DNA, the first detailed study of the genetics of British people has revealed.

The analysis shows that the Anglo-Saxons were the only conquering force, around 400-500 AD, to substantially alter the country’s genetic makeup, with most white British people now owing almost 30% of their DNA to the ancestors of modern-day Germans.

Student Genealogy Grant Applications Invited

The following announcement was written by the Suzanne Winsor Freeman Memorial Student Genealogy Grant Committee:

March 17, 2015 – The Suzanne Winsor Freeman Memorial Student Genealogy Grant Committee is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the 2015 Student Genealogy award. Student genealogists between the ages of 18 and 23 are eligible to apply for the $500 cash award.

The 2015 Southern California Genealogy Jamboree sponsored by the Southern California Genealogical Society will provide a full conference registration to the SCGS Jamboree in June where the award will be presented. This is a unique opportunity for a young genealogist to attend a premiere regional conference and meet genealogists from throughout the nation.

RootsTech 2015 Breaks all Attendance Records

The fifth annual RootsTech 2015 conference held last month in Salt lake City appears to have been the largest genealogy conference ever held with 23,918 attendees. Here is the announcement from FamilySearch:

The fifth annual RootsTech 2015 conference, hosted by FamilySearch, is officially in the record books as registering 23,918 attendees over three days, an 83% increase over 2014. And it’s not done yet as the world’s largest family history conference. There are already plans to deliver over 1,000 local family discovery day events throughout the remainder of 2015. It’s another indicator that family history continues to be a strong and growing interest not only in the United States, but internationally as well. Attendees to RootsTech 2015 came from far and wide, hailing from 49 states (West Virginia was the holdout) and 37 countries.

The popular conference’s formula for success included attracting well-known keynote speakers, such as former First Lady Laura Bush, Donny Osmond, Tan Le, and A. J. Jacobs, who shared inspiring family stories, and offering a rich combination of more than 500 classes, exhibits, demonstrations, and fun entertainment designed to appeal to multiple generations of family members and broad family history interests. Select sessions from RootsTech 2015 can be viewed for free at RootsTech.org.

NEHGS Announces Changes in The Register

The following announcement was written by the New England Historic Genealogical Society:

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, the Oldest Genealogical Journal in America, Appears in a New Format

New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) Announces Changes in Content and Design of the “Register,” Its Scholarly Journal First Published in 1847

Click on the above image to view a larger version

March 18, 2015—Boston, Massachusetts—A new, colorful cover on the country’s oldest genealogical journal signals change. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register—the quarterly journal of New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS)—appears this week in its 673rd issue, with a new design and an important broadening of editorial focus.

In making the announcement, NEHGS President and CEO D. Brenton Simons stated, “This makes the Register even more accessible and valuable to genealogists everywhere and solidifies its place as the flagship journal of American genealogy.”

The “Register,” as it is frequently called, has seen relatively few changes during its many years of publication spanning 168 of the 170 years of the life of NEHGS, the founding genealogical society in America. But the newest quarterly issue contains some important new features designed to encourage family historians to explore the genealogical scholarship for which the Register has long been known.

California Man Receives a Law Licence to Practice after 125 Years

The California Supreme Court has posthumously awarded a law license to a Chinese immigrant who was barred from becoming a lawyer 125 years ago.

Hong Yen Chang was barred from practicing law in 1890 by the same court because “persons of the Mongolian race” were not granted citizenship.

Kansas Supreme Court Proposed Restricted Access to Kansas Marriage Records

The Kansas Supreme Court is considering proposed changes to Supreme Court Rule 106 to clarify treatment of personally identifiable information in marriage licensing documents maintained by the district courts. The new proposal restricts marriage records to attorneys, court officers, and to:

Progeny Genealogy’s Charting Companion now includes Scalable Vector Graphics

One of the more attractive genealogy products available is Charting Companion, produced by Progeny Genealogy. I am always amazed that this great charting program isn’t better known. Charting Companion is a Windows program that creates great looking charts, including giant wall charts, from GEDCOM files or directly from Ancestral Quest, Family Historian, Family Tree Maker, Legacy Family Tree, Personal Ancestral File or RootsMagic. Now a new option has been added that can create family tree charts in SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) format, or embedded in an HTML page. This means genealogists can display their charts in a better, more compact and Web-friendly format than ever before.

Now Online: Death Notices Appearing in Lansingburgh, New York, Newspapers 1787 – 1895

The following announcement was written by the Troy Irish Genealogy Society:

An index to 9,682 death notices that were published in ten different Lansingburgh, New York, newspapers from 1787 to 1895 was created by staff at the Troy Public Library in 1938 through 1939. The Troy Irish Genealogy Society was allowed by the Troy Library to scan the two books of these important records so they could be made available on-line for genealogy researchers. To see these records go to the TIGS website – www.troyirish.com – click on PROJECTS and then click on DEATH NOTICES APPEARING IN LANSINGBURGH NEWSPAPERS.

Lansingburgh, by the way, for those not in the Capital District Region, was the first chartered village in Rensselaer County and was settled around 1763. In 1900 Lansingburgh became part of the City of Troy, New York.

ArkivDigital in Sweden is having Another Free Weekend This Weekend

The very popular ArkivDigital web site is offering free access this weekend, March 21 and 22. You will have to register in order to access the site but there is no charge. You will also have to install the ArkivDigital software in your Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or iPad computer in order to view the files.

Details may be found at http://www.arkivdigital.net/products/adonline/try-for-free/.

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