Hardware

I Added Four Terabytes to My Personal Cloud

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In the past 18 years that I have been writing this newsletter, I think I have written the following statement at least a dozen times: “The price of disk storage keeps dropping.” Today I am writing that statement one more time. This weekend, I purchased a four-terabyte NAS hard drive and added it to my in-home network. I now have even more space for my backups and those of my family members. Best of all, the price was so low as to be undreamed of only a few years ago. You can do the same.

I elected to purchase a network-attached storage (NAS) drive, not the normal USB drive.

Get a 14-inch HP Chromebook and Free 4G Wireless for $179.99 or $199.99

I have written often about the low-cost Chromebook computers and how useful they are. I own one of the earlier Chromebooks and use it often. Now Rick Broida has found a bargain that is appealing. (I love the bargains that Rick finds!) This Chromebook has much better specs than my aging computer.

The refurbished HP Chromebook 14 is available for $179.99, plus $5 for shipping. That’s for the white model with 2 gigabytes of RAM memory. If you want 4 gigabytes of RAM and your choice of white, turquoise, or peach, the price jumps to just $199.99.

The best thing of all is the included 200 megabytes of monthly wireless data connections, courtesy of T-Mobile, at no extra charge. This laptop is not limited to short-range wi-fi networks, although it can use wi-fi also. As long as you are within range of a T-Mobile cell phone tower, you can read and write email messages, surf the web, and do most anything else you want to do online. There is no annual contract and no credit card required to activate the service. (I have the same service in my iPad and use it often.)

HP announces an Android-powered Notebook

For a long time, most of us assumed that laptops and the smaller “notebook” computers would always run either the Windows or the Macintosh operating system. In the past few years, the Chrome has taken over the lower-priced laptop market, as shown by the list of best selling laptop computers updated hourly by Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Computers-Accessories-Laptop/zgbs/pc/565108. As I write these words, Chromebooks account for six of the top 15 laptops being sold today by Amazon.

Now there is a new contender: Android.

Hands On: HP’s new 7 Plus, an Excellent $99 or $119 Android Tablet

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Hewlett-Packard has a new tablet computer that I think is a bargain. The HP 7 Plus retails for only $119, but HP has been selling them at an “introductory price” of $99. This low-priced tablet has most all the features of tablet computers that cost much more. The $99 price even includes free shipping. I purchased a 7 Plus a few days ago and now am impressed with this tablet computer. It runs all the available Android tablet applications, including genealogy programs. It also is an excellent ebook reader, capable of storing hundreds of ebooks, including Kindle books, ePub books, PDF ebooks, and more. It stores and displays thousands of digital photographs and MP3 music files, and it can even store and play several full-length Hollywood movies when riding on airplanes or on the commuter train. Not bad for $99!

Forget Linux – A Chromebook is the Perfect Replacement for Windows XP

Here is one more article about Chromebooks. This one was written by Daniel Price and is available on the MakeUseOf web site at http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/forget-linux-chromebook-perfect-replacement-windows-xp/.

You can read my earlier articles about Chromebooks by starting at http://wp.me/p5Z3-8J and at http://wp.me/p5Z3-fO.

Google Glass Now On Sale in US, and I Got Mine!

That’s me, wearing Google Glass shortly after taking it out of the box.

Google is making Google Glass available to everyone in the U.S., as long as supplies last. The devices being sold are clearly labeled as “beta,” meaning that not all bugs are stamped out just yet. The company said it still considers this to be part of the Glass Explorer Program, otherwise known as “beta.” It is not a full-blown consumer launch, which is expected to happen later this year. At this time Google is also limiting orders to U.S. customers only.

Being an early adopter, I ordered mine weeks ago, and it arrived yesterday. I am still learning how to use it.

A Chromebook Laptop Computer for $99

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I use a Chromebook often and love it. It boots up within seconds and never gets viruses. It is a very capable computer that surfs the web, reads and writes email, plays hundreds of games, and works well with Facebook, Twitter, and dozens of other online services. It does require a wi-fi Internet connection to accomplish most tasks, however. Chromebooks normally sell for $200 to $350 or so. Today, Rick Broida’s CNET Cheapskate column lists a well-known and highly-rated Acer C710 Chromebook that sells for $99 and that price even includes free 2-day shipping.

To be sure, that price is after a mail-in $20 rebate and the laptop is factory recertified, meaning that it was returned to the factory for some reason, then checked out and offered for sale again. It includes a 90-day warranty. I already own a similar Chromebook but if I was looking to buy a new laptop, I’d consider this one carefully. It is an excellent laptop computer for yourself, a child, a grandchild, or for an adult with limited or no computer experience.

Grace Hopper and the UNIVAC

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Look at the handheld tablet or smartphone you carry in your pocket or purse. It seems difficult to believe it is far more powerful than the Univac-I computer that weighed 13 tons, had 5,200 vacuum tubes, and took up a whole garage. Only 46 Univac-I computers were ever built but it revolutionized the world.

Grace Hopper, born in New York in 1906, was an associate professor of mathematics at Vassar when WWII broke out. Volunteering for the US Navy Reserve, she was assigned to the Bureau of Ships Computation Project, where she worked on the Harvard Mark I project (a calculating machine used in the war effort), from 1944–9, co-authoring several papers.

Refurbished NeatDesk Scanners are on Sale

NeatDesk Scanner

Every genealogist needs a scanner (or two!) to save documents, notes, and much more. In addition, I have written a number of times about the advantages of going paperless. One disadvantage of going paperless, however, is the high prices of the document scanners, especially those that scan both sides of a sheet of paper and have an automatic sheet feed input tray that can hold a number sheets of paper to be scanned at one time. Now Staples has a sale on refurbished Neat scanners that can make life easier for anyone who is drowning in paper.

NeatReceipts Scanner

The Neat Scanner is speedy, portable, and able to handle documents of all sizes easily, from business cards to full-sized sheets of paper. It is available in two varieties, the NeatDesk that can hold a stack of papers to be scanned as well as the NeatReceipts, a smaller, USB-powered version that can only handle one sheet of paper at a time but easily fits into a briefcase.

Both models include supporting Windows software to make scanning and organizing your documents easy, and that also sync with the Neat mobile app for iOS and Android.

The $349 Hovercam Solo 8: Possibly the World’s Best Document Scanner?

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Let’s go paperless. A document scanner is one in which a document, photograph, map, or even small objects, such as coins, are placed on a flat bed surface and an overhead camera makes a digital image of the item. Genealogists, museums, and libraries often use document scanners for digitizing oversized books, deeds, maps, or most anything else that does not easily fit into a regular-size scanner. A document scanner takes a snapshot of the document placed beneath its lens in a split second, much like a camera, as opposed to the more drawn-out method of traditional scanners – and takes up much less desktop space than a flatbed. Most document scanners also create much higher resolution images than possible with the use of a normal camera.

Why Use a Chromebook?

Would you like to purchase a new laptop computer for yourself, a child, a grandchild, or for an adult with limited or no computer experience? Does it need to have a full-sized screen and a decent keyboard? Do you want to do word processing, spreadsheets, read and write email, surf the web, access Facebook and Twitter, access online banking applications, and also play lots of games? Would you like a computer that never gets viruses, doesn’t need backups, and is simple to operate? Do you also have a broadband Internet connection available? Would you like to pay $200 to perhaps $250 for this laptop? If so, I have a suggestion for you.

Chrome Operating System

A Chromebook is a low-cost laptop computer that does not run Windows, does not run Macintosh, and doesn’t even run Linux. Instead, a Chromebook runs the Chrome operating system, a competitor to the other operating systems. The Chrome operating system was developed by Google. Chromebooks usually sell for bargain basement prices: $200 to $250. However, you might see a few at higher prices, typically offering bigger display screens, cell phone wireless network connections, or larger disk drives.

Recreate Long-Lost Family Heirlooms from a Picture

Newsletter reader Joy Masepoli sent a link to a fascinating online article. 3D printing isn’t a method of printing on paper. Instead, it is a computer-controlled piece of machinery that can create three-dimensional solid objects of virtually any shape. 3D printing has been used to create machinery, replacement parts for antique automobiles, toys, doorknobs, bone implants for humans, dental implants, and even parts to rebuild the face of a motorcyclist who had been seriously injured in a road accident. (See http://goo.gl/5qNZBy for details about the facial implant.)

Now a “Jewelry Replicator” can duplicate a piece of heirloom jewelry, even though the original is not available. All that is needed is a photograph. In fact, the company is focusing on old family photos.

U.S. Air Force Still Uses 8-inch Floppies in a Computer that Delivers Launch Commands to US Nuclear Missiles

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And I thought genealogists were sometimes slow to modernize! Lesley Stahl from the “60 Minutes” news program discovered that the U.S. Air Force still uses 8-inch floppy disks to load data into the communication system that delivers launch commands to US missile forces. That includes missiles with nuclear warheads.

8-inch floppies? I thought they became obsolete in the 1980s.

Want a Cheap Laptop? Add a Keyboard to an iPad or Android Tablet Computer

Many people own and love their tablet computers. I have an Pad Mini and it has become my primary traveling computer. I hear similar statements from owners of various Android tablets as well. As useful as these tiny powerhouses may be, they are still seriously hampered by the lack of a keyboard. The solution? Add a keyboard!

iPad Mini with Logitech Keyboard

That suggestion is obvious. Adding an external high quality keyboard converts a tablet computer into a reasonably-priced laptop computer. Perhaps it should be called a netbook.

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