Online Sites

Irish Archives Resource Goes Online

Irish Archives Resource, abbreviated as “IAR,” is a portal that recently has been greatly expanded. It links together hundreds of unique archival collections and 34 archive services in Ireland north and south. Ireland’s first archive web portal, Irish Archives Resource (IAR), includes contribution from Trinity College Dublin’s Manuscripts and Archives Research Department, RTÉ Stills Library, National Museum of Ireland Archives, University College Cork Archives, Derry City Council Heritage and Museum Service, and the archives of St Patrick’s College, Maynooth. It does not hold any images of archives or records. Instead, it provides a means to search archival descriptions from various contributing institutions.

The archive is not specifically a genealogy resource. Instead, it contains all sorts of archival descriptions, many of which will prove to be useful resources to genealogists, historians, social scientists, film historians, Irish citizens, Irish emigrants and their descendants, and to many others. It should appeal to anyone interested in accessing Ireland’s archival heritage.

New Images Added to PERSI

The Periodical Source Index, or PERSI, is the largest subject index to genealogy and local history periodical articles in the world. It is an index to more than 2.5 million entries from thousands of historical, genealogical and ethnic publications. Most of PERSI’s articles are from periodicals covering the United States and Canada, but you can also find thousands of genealogy and local history entries (in both English and French) from Britain, Ireland and Australia.

Created by the staff of the Allen County Public Library Foundation and the ACPL’s Genealogy Center, PERSI is widely recognized as a vital tool for genealogical researchers. For years, PERSI was available in a series of books but now is available online at the FindMyPast web site. PERSI is updated frequently. Now FindMyPast has images to the indexes, allowing the user to access articles, photos, and other material that might be difficult to find using other research methods. PERSI’s titles may be searched free of charge although viewing the contents found requires a paid FindMyPast subscription.

According to the FindMyPast Blog, the list of images added to periodicals in the past month include:

FamilySearch Adds More Than 3.8 Million Indexed Records and Images to Brazil, Columbia, England, India, and United States

The following was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added more than 3.8 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, Columbia, England, India, and United States. Notable collection updates include the 634,582 images from the Colombia, Catholic Church Records, 1600–2012, collection; the 928,307 images from the US, Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797–1954, collection; and the 899,395 images from the US, Ohio, County Death Records, 1840–2001, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

Use CensusReporter to Learn About Your City and Census Tool to Dig Through Decades of Data

An interesting article by Justin Pot in the MakeUseOf web site describes a couple of tools that can make U.S. census data even more useful.

With CensusReporter, you can type in the name of your town and you can start scrolling through all kinds of census data. You’ll see charts that let you absorb the information at a glance, along with comparisons to regional and state numbers. Scrolling through the information offered by default is a great start, but you can also search for other reports.

Have you ever wondered about the people who used to live in your house? Census Tool may be able to help. You can find your old house in the 1940 and earlier U.S. census records and then discover a little about what life was like for its former residences. You’ll see their name, what they did for a living, even how much money they make.

DeceasedOnline adds Blackburn with Darwen Burial and Cremation Records

The following announcement was written by the folks at DeceasedOnline:

deceasedonlineBlackburn with Darwen burial and cremation records available on family history website

One of the North West’s first councils to digitize records for global access

All burial and cremation records for Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council have been digitized and added to the specialist family history website www.deceasedonline.com.

Library of Congress Offers a New Collection of Depression Era Photographs

The Library of Congress has a great collection of photographs from the Great Depression that has recently been updated. The collection now contains more than 175,000 portraits of America between the years 1935 and 1945, taken by photographers of the government’s Farm Security Administration. The photographs also include all known data about the subject(s) in each photo, including the date and location of the photograph and also the name of the photographer.

Click on the images to view larger versions.

Thanks to a new project known as Photogrammar from Yale University, viewers will have a much easier time exploring the photographs. There’s a map that displays the images by county and another that shows where each picture was taken and by which photographer. There’s also an interactive that allows viewers to sort the photos by theme (e.g. “war” or “religion”) and then browse from there. Other tools are still in the works.

TellMeBye

You made out your will, correct? Once you depart this earth, your heirs will be informed of your wishes for disposition of the insurance money, the house, the family heirlooms, and the other various items you have accumulated in your life. However, what about your genealogy data? How about the collection of tweets or the posts on Facebook? How about your digital images and videos? How about your Bitcoins that are stored only in electronic format? Who should be able to look at your email messages? If you don’t take positive action NOW, all those electronic items can vaporize with no one to look after them.

TellMeBye is an online tool for everyone who would like to plan the inheritance of their entire digital legacy and, therefore, make it easier for others to receive their documents, messages, memories, or content. You can also disclose your final wishes and provide information to help your family members with formalities after your death, such as details of your insurance policies, a PDF copy of your will, what to do with your body, people to be told, final wishes, and much more.

MyHeritage and BillionGraves Honored for Global Crowdsourcing Project

MyHeritage and BillionGraves were awarded the Presidential Citation at the FGS (Federation of Genealogical Societies) conference this past weekend for their partnership in promoting the preservation of international burial locations.

Quoting from the MyHeritage Blog:

Gravestones are a great resource for family history investigation and a useful tool to learn more about your ancestors. They provide detailed information such as names, dates of birth and death and often describe personality. However, natural wear and tear means that these important family history sources need to be preserved before it’s too late. Together, MyHeritage and BillionGraves launched a global initiative to digitize cemeteries and gravestones to preserve these gravestones by making them accessible for free online to millions to aid in their family history research.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 7.2 Million Indexed Records and Images to Argentina, Germany, Jamaica, Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added more than 7.2 million indexed records and images to collections from Argentina, Germany, Jamaica, Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,703,079 indexed records from the Jamaica, Civil Registration, 1880–1999, collection; the 2,522,767 indexed records and images from the United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980–2014, collection; and the 852,481 indexed records from U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Price of Online Storage Drops Even More: Dropbox Slashes Its Dropbox Pro Price by 90%!

I was pleasantly surprised today to receive an email message from Dropbox announcing a major price DECREASE. I am a Dropbox Pro subscriber and have been paying $9.99 per month to store up to 100 gigabytes of data. Now, for that same price, any Dropbox Pro subscriber can store one terabyte. That’s ten times the storage at no increase in price. I am surprised.

Update: Create Your Own Who Do You Think You Are? Story with FindMyPast

A bit more than two weeks ago, I wrote about a new service entitled, Create Your Own Who Do You Think You Are? Story with FindMyPast.co.uk.” Note the letters “.co.uk” on the end of the address. Near the end of the article, I wrote, “The historical information added by FindMyPast seems to feature mostly U.K. events. That isn’t surprising as the service is being offered on FindMyPast’s U.K. web site at FindMyPast.co.uk. If this new beta test becomes successful, I might guess it will later be offered in versions for the U.S. as well as for other countries.”

It looks like my guess was correct. The service is now available with U.S. historical events included in the timelines. For an example of a family story using U.S. history and timelines, look at Josh Taylor’s family story at http://goo.gl/jUze3o.

FindMyPast.co.uk Adds Leek’s Workhouse Archive

The history of Leek Workhouse and who was born there has been digitally archived and is available to members of the public. Spanning 1538 to 1900, the parish records mark the start of a project to create the Staffordshire Collection on Findmypast – a source which on completion is set to comprise around six million fully searchable transcripts and scanned images of handwritten parish records.

You can read more in an article in the Leek Post and Times at http://goo.gl/412P8Y.

New Australian Passenger Lists Available on Findmypast

Findmypast has added Australian records: inbound passenger lists to Victoria, 1839-1923 (2,125,578 records) and outbound from Victoria 1852-1915 (1,753,919 records).

These inbound and outbound passenger lists will usually contain names, estimated birth years, nationalities, native places, month and year of arrival, ship name, destination port and departure port, so they contain a lot of information that can be instrumental in filling in blanks that you may have in your research.

You can read the details in the Findmypast Blog at http://goo.gl/eORKxR.

Mocavo’s Back to School Special: Free Access to Universal Search Weekend

The following announcement was written by the folks at mocavo.com:

What better way to top off Mocavo’s Back to School Week than with an Open Access to Universal Search weekend? Usually you need to be a Mocavo Gold member to search all of our databases at once, but for this weekend only, you can search more than420,000 databases to your heart’s content. Kick start your research today and see who you will discover.

Start Searching Now

FamilySearch Adds More Than 1.5 Million Indexed Records and Images to Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ghana, Italy, and the United States

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added more than 1.5 million indexed records and images to collections from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ghana, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 524,584 images from the Italy, Torino, Ivrea, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866–1937, collection; the 217,208 images from the New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1848–1991, collection; and the 148,311 images from Spain, Province of Tarragona, Municipal Records, 1430–1943, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FindMyPast Launches ‘Hall Of Heroes’ to Celebrate the Heroes in Everyone’s Family

The following announcement was written by the folks at FindMyPast:

  • Findmypast.com launches ‘Hall of Heroes’ campaign to share individual stories about heroic figures from everyone’s own family history
  • Call for people to submit stories of their own family heroes to be included alongside famous historical figures
  • New record sets launched to help people discover the heroes in their family

More Hertfordshire Council Records added to Deceased Online

The following announcement was written by Deceased Online:

Welwyn Hatfield is latest Hertfordshire council to place records on Deceased Online All burial records for Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council (WelHat) in Hertfordshire have been digitized and added to the specialist family history website www.deceasedonline.com.

Click on the above image to view a larger version

The Council covers the areas of Welwyn Garden City and Hatfield in the centre of Hertfordshire within the East of England Region to the north of London. Welwyn Garden City is England’s 2nd garden city, founded in 1920 by Sir Ebenezer Howard. Hatfield by contrast has a long history and was mentioned in the Domesday Book.

Volunteers to Scan 40,000 Historic Titles at Onondaga County Public Library for Free Online Access

First it was a trickle, then a stream, then a river, and then the flow became a tsunami. Organizations everywhere are rushing to digitize books wherever they may be found. Through an agreement with FamilySearch.org, the Onondaga County (New York) Public Library’s collection of more than 40,000 historic titles soon will be carefully scanned, one page at a time, and uploaded for free genealogy research online.

FamilySearch supplied the scanning equipment. Volunteers supply the time. The project is expected to take more than a year to complete. Work got underway last week.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 5.1 Million Indexed Records and Images to Brazil, New Zealand, and the United States

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Family Search LogoFamilySearch has added more than 5.1 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, New Zealand, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 375,900 indexedrecords from the Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980, collection; the 1,152,816 indexed records and images from the U.S., BillionGraves Index, collection; and the 3,560,424 indexed records from U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

Create Your Own Who Do You Think You Are? Story with FindMyPast.co.uk

FindMyPast.co.uk has released a beta version of a new service. It allows anyone to create a personal “Who Do You Think You Are?” story, modeled after the very successful television series.

In essence, you can become the star in your own Who Do You Think You Are? episode, telling your family’s story using your own words and pictures. You can include interesting tidbits such as family gossip and special memories. The web site will then automatically add historical events to swap for key points in your family’s history. You can preview and edit your progress as you go. You can email relatives to ask for help on family facts, and continue to build your story at any time.

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