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Super Cheap Storage Space in the Cloud for Your Files

Prices keep dropping in technology and especially for services on the Internet. Everyone needs to make backups of their critical files and many people, myself included, make those backups to web-based services such as DropBox, SugarSync, iCloud, Google Drive, and numerous others. Some of those services even give away a modest amount of storage space free of charge. For instance, DropBox allows users up to 2 gigabytes of free space. Google Drive and Microsoft’s OneDrive service both are free for the first 15 gigabytes of storage space. Other services may offer more or less storage free of charge.

If the free storage space is large enough to meet your needs, I’d suggest you take advantage of the offers. However, many of us need more space than what is available free of charge. In many cases, we need a lot more space to store family photographs, genealogy databases, email messages, last year’s tax returns, and much, much more. One terabyte (1,000 gigabytes) on Dropbox costs $100/year, on Google Drive it’s $120/year, and iCloud charges $240/year.

For some period of time, Amazon S3 and Amazon Glacier have been the low-priced leaders in the off-site file storage services. Now the same company has even dropped its prices further.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 5.8 Million Indexed Records and Images for Australia, Canada, Hungary, Russia, South Africa, and the United States

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 5.8 million indexed records and images for Australia, Canada, Hungary, Russia, South Africa, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 2,435,483 indexed records from the Canada Census, 1911 collection; 2,069,202 indexed records from the Australia, Queensland Cemetery Records, 1802–1990 collection; and 310,900 images from the Russia, Tula Poll Tax Census (Revision Lists), 1758–1895 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Findmypast adds new US & UK Records

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Over a million fascinating British and US military records are now available to search thanks to the latest installment of Findmypast Friday. Over 1.3 million US Civil War pension records are now available to search and the ability to search by surname has been added to our collection of British Mariners, Trinity House Calendar records. Nearly 29,000 records containing the details of Officers and enlisted men who served with the Royal Artillery are also now available to search along with a First World War Roll of Honour from Clacton on Sea in Essex.

United States Civil War Pension Files Index 1861-1934
Containing over 1.3 million records, the United States Civil War Pension Files Index, 1861-1934, is an index of pension application cards for veterans and their beneficiaries. This time period actually covers veterans of numerous wars including the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, the Philippine Insurrection and World War I. The bulk of these files pertain to service in the U.S. Civil War, which saw millions of Americans enlisted into the Union Army. Pensions were received by soldiers or their beneficiaries for service rendered and were available to widows, children under the age of sixteen, and dependent relatives of soldiers who died in military service from war-related injuries or diseases. Each record includes a transcript and many include an image of the original index card. Most transcripts will list the applicant’s name, relation and year of application, while images can reveal the veteran’s unit, the time he applied for the pension, names of his widow or children, pension application numbers, previous pension application numbers, certificate numbers, and the name of his attorney.

Announcing Avotaynu Online!

A new web site appeared online this afternoon. It is a significant new undertaking by Avotaynu Inc. Best of all, it includes all articles from 2007 through 2011 published in AVOTAYNU, the International Review of Jewish Genealogy. The following announcement was written by the folks at Avotaynu Inc.:

Avotaynu Inc is pleased to announce the creation of “Avotaynu Online,” an exciting new venture intended to stimulate collaboration among Jewish genealogists in all its forms. Leading participants in the various areas of genealogical research will provide in-depth articles on events and discoveries on a regular basis.

Avotaynu Online will be available free of charge from the venture’s website at http://avotaynuonline.com/, which will be shared simultaneously on Facebook and Twitter. Reports will be delivered in different formats, including text, video, and podcasts.

The Knowles Collection Jewish Genealogy Database Reaches One Million Records

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

SALT LAKE CITY, March 25, 2015 — The Knowles Collection, a quickly growing, free online Jewish genealogy database linking generations of Jewish families from all over the world, reached its one-millionth record milestone and is now easily searchable online. The collection started from scratch just over seven years ago, with historical records gathered from FamilySearch’s collections. Now the vast majority of new contributions are coming from families and private archives worldwide. The free collection can be accessed at FamilySearch.org/family-trees.

The databases from the Knowles Collection are unlike other collections in that people are linked as families and the collection can be searched by name, giving researchers access to records of entire families. All records are sourced and show the people who donated the records so cousins can contact one another. New records are added continually, and the collection is growing by about 10,000 names per month from over 80 countries. Corrections are made as the need is found, and new links are added continually.

Troy (New York) Irish Genealogy Society Adds Marriage Notices Appearing in Lansingburgh Newspapers 1787 – 1895

The following announcement was written by the Troy (New York) Irish Genealogy Society:

An index to 2,712 marriage notices covering 5,424 names that were published in ten different Lansingburgh, New York newspapers from 1787 to 1895 was created by staff at the Troy Public Library in 1938 through 1939. The Troy Irish Genealogy Society was allowed by the Troy Library to scan this book so these important records could be made available on-line for genealogy researchers. To see these records go to the TIGS website – www.troyirish.com – click on PROJECTS and then click on MARRIAGE NOTICES APPEARING IN LANSINGBURGH NEWSPAPERS.

Lansingburgh, by the way, for those not in the Capital District Region, was the first chartered village in Rensselaer County and was settled around 1763. In 1900 Lansingburgh became part of the City of Troy, New York.

The ten different Lansingburgh newspapers were:

Drouin Institute adds to its Repertory of Vital Events

The following announcement was written by the Drouin Institute, a well-known provider of French-Canadian data:

A year ago, the Programme de recherche en démographie historique (PRDH) of the Université de Montréal proudly announced that the Drouin Institute (IGD) (http://www.drouininstitute.com/) was now the editor for the public use of the PRDH data put together for the needs of University research. We had then written that this new development, qualified as “a welcome marriage between genealogy and university research”, would certainly lead to new initiatives, favourable for both researchers and the general public.

Here is a striking example of what we meant! We are adding today to the Repertory of Vital Events on our site the 1 700 000 baptisms, marriages and burials for the period 1800-1849 obtained from the IGD who did the data extracting for the baptisms and burials and of the Protestant marriages and made it available for university research, the marriages coming from the Balsac project at the Université du Québec à Chicoutimi.

Secrets of London’s Infamous Bedlam Mental Hospital Revealed at Findmypast

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

  • Findmypast is working with Bethlem Museum of the Mind at Bethlem Royal Hospital, in London, UK, popularly known as Bedlam, to make its extensive patient records from 1683 – 1932 available online for the very first time
  • Over 248,000 records, many including photos, reveal the lives and stories of its inmates
  • Highlights of the detailed records show why people were committed included stabbing people with cutlery, insatiable appetite for pleasure, condemnation of sinful behaviour from public officials, objecting to a forced marriage, religious fervour, paralysis, women dressing as men and moreLondon, UK, 19 March 2015 – Leading family history website, Findmypast, today announced an exciting partnership with Bethlem Museum of the Mind to release Bethlem Royal Hospital’s extensive patient records online for the very first time. The records are being released today to mark the official reopening of the museum in Beckenham, with Findmypast making scans of the original patient case notes and staff registers available online for browsing and searching by everyone.

Milford (Michigan) Times Obituary Index 1929-1949 is now Online

One of the earliest newspapers in the State of Michigan, the Milford Times was the premiere newspaper in the Huron Valley area. The newspaper is still in publication and has always included news from Milford, Michigan, and many of the surrounding communities, including Highland Township, Commerce Townhip, White Lake Township, Hartland, Hickory Ridge, Wixom, Clyde, Walled Lake, Novi, and New Hudson. Now the obituaries from 1929 through 1949 have been indexed and made available online. The index is available at http://milfordlibrary.info/find-information/milford-times-obituary-request.

The Milford Public Library also won a grant for digitizing the paper. Details may be found at http://goo.gl/pA48Wm.

Now Online: Death Notices Appearing in Lansingburgh, New York, Newspapers 1787 – 1895

The following announcement was written by the Troy Irish Genealogy Society:

An index to 9,682 death notices that were published in ten different Lansingburgh, New York, newspapers from 1787 to 1895 was created by staff at the Troy Public Library in 1938 through 1939. The Troy Irish Genealogy Society was allowed by the Troy Library to scan the two books of these important records so they could be made available on-line for genealogy researchers. To see these records go to the TIGS website – www.troyirish.com – click on PROJECTS and then click on DEATH NOTICES APPEARING IN LANSINGBURGH NEWSPAPERS.

Lansingburgh, by the way, for those not in the Capital District Region, was the first chartered village in Rensselaer County and was settled around 1763. In 1900 Lansingburgh became part of the City of Troy, New York.

ArkivDigital in Sweden is having Another Free Weekend This Weekend

The very popular ArkivDigital web site is offering free access this weekend, March 21 and 22. You will have to register in order to access the site but there is no charge. You will also have to install the ArkivDigital software in your Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or iPad computer in order to view the files.

Details may be found at http://www.arkivdigital.net/products/adonline/try-for-free/.

Michigan Death Certificates 1921-1939 are now Available for FREE at Seeking Michigan

The following is a quote from the SeekingMichigan.com web site at http://seekingmichigan.org/look/2015/03/17/theyre-here:

Today (March 17, 2015) is Seeking Michigan’s sixth birthday, and the Archives of Michigan is thrilled to announce that images of Michigan death certificates from 1921-1939 are now available for free here at Seeking Michigan. The index for records from 1940-1952 will be made available in the next few weeks, with additional certificate images to be released each year as privacy restrictions are lifted; for example, 1940 images will be released in January 2016. Together with the records from 1897-1920 that have been available here for years, this collection makes Seeking Michigan the one-stop destination for more than 2.6 million free, publicly-available 20th century death records for your Michigan ancestors.

In advance of St. Patrick’s Day, Findmypast is Making Records from Ireland’s Western Seaboard Available Online for the First Time

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Includes detailed information from the Irish Reproductive Loan Fund’s Poverty Relief Loans, and role they played in the mass immigration of the Irish to America

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, March 16, 2015 – Findmypast, a leading family history site which provides access to more than two billion international ancestry records, will mark St. Patrick’s Day 2015 by making records pertaining to the Irish diaspora in the United States available online for the first time.

The depth of data included in these records offers much more than just names, dates and monetary figures. The archives also reveal details which allow researchers to build an accurate story of the events, challenges and emigration dreams of people living during and in the immediate aftermath of The Great Famine.

IGRS Launches Enhanced ‘Irish Genealogist Database’ on its Website

The following announcement was written by the Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS):

The GRS – “The Great Granddaddy of all Irish Family History Societies” – announces the launch of an exciting enhancement to its ‘Irish Genealogist Database’.

The Irish Genealogist (TIG) has been published annually since 1937 and comprises thousands of articles relating to Irish genealogy, noting details on family histories, pedigrees, leases, memorial inscriptions, deeds, newspaper extracts and transcripts of parish registers, voters lists, census substitutes, wills, letters, family bibles, rentals and militia & army rolls. The list is endless!

Origins.net Will Be Closing Down

Findmypast will soon close down its Origins.net subsidiary web site. As explained at http://www.findmypast.co.uk/origins:

All of the records previously available at origins.net are now available right here at Findmypast. Explore over two billion records including millions of parish records, wills, probate and court records. What’s more, you can view the Oxfordshire Wills Index, 1516-1857, and three other record sets, completely free!

FamilySearch Adds More Than 2.2 Million Indexed Records and Images to Australia, Philippines, Slovakia, Ukraine, the United States, and Zimbabwe

The following announcement is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch adds more than 2.2 million indexed records and images to Australia, Philippines, Slovakia, Ukraine, the United States, and Zimbabwe. Notable collection updates include the 133,189 indexed records from the Zimbabwe, Death notices, 1904–1976 collection; the 78,244 images from the US, Tennessee, Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1865–1872 collection; and the 62,154 images from theUkraine, Zaporizhia Poll Tax Census (Revision Lists), 1811–1858 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Geni.com Now Supports Adoption

Geni.com is a very popular genealogy web site with many features. However, it is best known for showing how people are connected to one another. The term “connected” is not restricted to blood relatives. In Geni.com’s definition, people are connected via marriage and by in-law relationships as well as by bloodlines. Now the company has added adoptees to show people as part of “the family.” I suspect most adoptees will agree with that definition.

Here is the announcement from Geni.com:

Today we are delighted to announce a long awaited new feature on Geni – adoption! We are releasing a great enhancement to the family tree that will allow you to show adoptive, foster and biological parent relationships when viewing your family on Geni.

HeritageQuest Online Now Provides Data from Ancestry

HeritageQuest Online (a division of ProQuest) has supplied genealogy information to libraries for years. Many public libraries subscribe to HeritageQuest Online and make the information available to patrons who visit the library. Some libraries also offer in-home access to library card holders through the library’s website.

HeritageQuest Online has now announced that the genealogy information within its service is being replaced with information from Ancestry.com. Indeed, I logged onto my local public library’s web site this morning, went to the HeritageQuest Online database, and performed a search for an elusive great-great-grandfather of mine. When a census page appeared on the screen it looked clearer than what I have seen before and it also had an Ancestry logo in the upper-left corner:

Louisiana Digital Media Archive is Now Online

The Louisiana Digital Media Archive was launched last month with 1,600 digitized video clips from Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s and the Louisiana State Archives’ collections. An ongoing project and the first such partnership between a public television station and a state agency, the number of clips contained on the website will continue to grow.

Colorado Springs Death Registers Index Now Available Online

The following announcement was written by the folks at the Pikes Peak Genealogical Society:

The Pikes Peak Genealogical Society has just completed indexing 19,187 individuals from the Colorado Springs, Colorado, Death Registers, 1872-1920, making them freely available in the online, searchable Pikes Peak NewsFinder index (http://more.ppld.org:8080/SpecialCollections/Index/article_search.asp). The indexing project was a collaboration between PPGS and the Pikes Peak Library District Special Collections.

Information contained in the Death Registers includes name, death date, age, color, marital status, sex, occupation, birth place, cause of death, complication, when and where contracted, place of death and burial location. Information extracted for the index are name, death date and burial location, however a link provides access to a digital image of the original record and all its contents.

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