Online Sites

Fly Around Your Family Tree with ZoomPast

This is somewhat like playing space invaders in your family tree.

Let’s face it: displaying a family tree to other people, probably relatives, has never been easy. If everything is printed on paper, jumping from one page to another as you flip through the generations can be very confusing for the person trying to understand the relationships. Large paper is a big help but not everyone has a printing device that will fill a piece of paper that is as large as a wall.

Many of us use computers for storing our data but displaying it to others often is a “herky-jerky” motion as we click on link after link, jumping through generations. Did you ever try to show a non-genealogist relative ten generations of his or her ancestry, including cousins? Within a couple of minutes, that person’s eyes probably looked dazed.

What is needed is the electronic equivalent of a large rood map.

RootsBid Family History Website Now Officially Certified by FamilySearch

The following announcement was written by the folks at RootsBid:

RootsBid, a new family history research website, is now certified by FamilySearch and listed in the FamilySearch App Gallery.

American Fork, Utah – June 04, 2015 – RootsBid today announces certification for RootsBid.com on FamilySearch, the world’s largest collection of genealogical records. As part of the partnership, the RootsBid web application is featured prominently on FamilySearch’s App Gallery: a place to find, connect, organize, and explore your family.
“We are thrilled to be certified by FamilySearch.org as an approved application to help their user base with the genealogy research and records,” said Steven Pedersen, co-founder of RootsBid.

With RootsBid anyone can request or bid on family history projects around the world. This site is for people who are looking for help with their genealogy and also for those who are able to help others with their family history. RootsBid is especially effective for finding people who can perform family history projects in locations that are difficult to access for the requestor. Using RootsBid, they can now find genealogy experts and others who can complete family history tasks on their behalf all over the world.

Indexed Family History Records Now Available Through the DAR Genealogical Research System

The following announcement was written by the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is excited to announce a new resource has been added to its Genealogical Research System (GRS). The new resource is an index of over 40,000 digitized family Bible records, and each day more records are digitized and added to the Index. This is one of the largest known collections of such genealogical materials in existence. The DAR collection spans many decades, so even those researchers who are not looking for Revolutionary War era ancestors, may find the new Bible Records Index useful (www.dar.org/grs/bibleindex).

WikiTree Reaches 10 Million Profiles

The following announcement was written by the folks at WikiTree:

3 June 2015: This week the WikiTree community reached a major milestone: 10 million profiles on our shared family tree.

Since its founding in 2008, WikiTree has grown steadily but carefully. Although the community’s mission is to connect the entire human family on one tree — ultimately including billions of people — WikiTree prioritizes collaboration and accuracy.

Over 200,000 genealogists have added profiles to WikiTree. Many of them share ancestors. Rather than create duplicate ancestor profiles, they work together on the same profiles. When duplicates are created accidentally, they’re merged.

MyHeritage Instant Discoveries™ in Oslo

MyHeritage (the sponsor of this newsletter) recently took to the streets of Oslo to test the service on Norwegian passersby. The video shows how genealogy can inspire anyone, and portrays the emotional experience of making family history discoveries.

It also proves the extent of MyHeritage’s reach in Norway, and Scandinavia as a whole, as noted in my earlier article at http://blog.eogn.com/2015/02/17/myheritage-places-exclusive-scandinavian-records-online.

More than 16 Million Virginia Records Are Now Digitized and Online

Governor Terry McAuliffe announced on Tuesday morning that a massive project to help Virginians find important documents is now finished.

So far, birth and death records from 1912 to the present, marriage records from 1936 to the present and divorce records from 1918 to the present have been scanned and are available. Image are available and the records have also been indexed.

Here is the announcement from the Office of Governor McAuliffe:

Announcing a New Genealogy Website: Twile

I took a brief look at this web site this morning and it looks good. It is new so it doesn’t yet have a lot of information but it certainly shows promise. The following announcement was written by the folks at Twile:

New Website Lets Family Historians Share What They Find

Twile aims to make Genealogy more engaging for the whole family

Sheffield, UK, June 2, 2015 – Twile (www.twile.com) allows family historians to create rich, visual timelines of their family history, made up of milestones and photos from their ancestors’ lives. Genealogy services, like MyHeritage and Ancestry, focus primarily on providing access to historical records. Twile, on the other hand, helps users get a visualization of the information and easily share it with their family.

“We’ve found there is a family historian in pretty much every family, who gathers as much information as they can about their heritage,” said Twile co-founder, Paul Brooks. “Unfortunately, most of their family will never see any of it, either because it isn’t shared or because it’s hidden away in notes and scanned documents that are difficult for most people to digest.”

“Cuban Equivalent” of Ancestry.com Now Available Online

According to an article by Alexandra Pecharich in the Florida International University News, the Florida International University Libraries has unveiled an online resource to help families of the Cuban diaspora research their roots—and already several have hit pay dirt.

An extensive set of family trees, civil records and sacramental documents is now available on the Internet. It references thousands of Hispanic surnames and gives everyone from the Abadias to the Zúñigas the opportunity to search for their ancestors. The material comes from the Enrique Hurtado de Mendoza Collection of Cuban Genealogy, a treasure trove that also features hard copies of more than 3,500 17th and 18th century books, long out-of-print publications and periodicals that few, if any, other U.S. libraries hold. The online offerings can be accessed by going to FIU’s Digital Library of the Caribbean and searching by last name.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 3.7 Million Indexed Records and Images for Belgium, England, Germany, the Philippines, and the United States

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 3.7 million indexed records and images for Belgium, England, Germany, the Philippines, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 2,807,806 indexed records from the England, London Electoral Registers, 1847–1913 collection; 190,879 indexed records from theUS, Texas, Brownsville Passenger and Crew List of Airplanes, 1943–1964 collection; and 137,815 images from the Philippines, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1900–1952 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

New Exclusively Transcribed Record Collection Released From Forces War Records

The following announcement was written by the Forces War Records in Wiltshire, England:

This month, in commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of VE Day and the end of the war in Europe, Forces War Records will be releasing a brand new collection of daily reports from the Second World War.

We are really excited about this collection, as it includes detail not available in previously released Second World War data sets. It will give Forces War Records’ users information about what happened to your Army ancestors at very specific times during the war. Almost any military records will give the name, rank and service number of the subject, but officer records traditionally miss off the latter piece of information. In these records however, service numbers are also given for officers. In addition, information on deaths, wounds and prisoners of war is given, along with specific duty locations. Importantly, the collection also gives corrections for previously released lists where soldiers have, for example, been incorrectly recorded as killed or missing but later found to be alive and well.

TheGenealogist Releases 60,000 Railway Worker Records

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

  • More than 60,000 railway workers have been added to the Occupational Records on TheGenealogist
  • Find details of railway ancestors, where they were employed and what they did
  • Trace your railway worker ancestor’s careers through their promotions
  • Discover when they retired
  • Read obituaries

Click on the above image to view a larger version

Click on the above image to view a larger versionThe Genealogist has added over 60,000 rail workers to its online indexes of Railway Employment Records. Taken from Railway Company Staff magazines these records are useful to family historians with railway employee ancestors, wanting to find important occupation related dates and add some social history to their family tree. These records include such details as staff changes, promotions, pension records, retirements and obituaries. Often additional personal information is revealed in the magazines. In some cases you can read about gifts from co-workers given when rail staff leave.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 1.7 Million Indexed Records and Images for Australia, China, India, Peru, the Philippines, and the United States

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 1.7 million indexed records and images for Australia, China, India, Peru, the Philippines, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 327,195 images from the Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874–1996 collection; 275,449 images from the Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005 collection; and 249,700 images from the Peru, San Martín, Civil Registration, 1850–1999 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

Mocavo Announces: U.S. Federal Census Images & Viewer are now Free for Everyone Forever

The folks at Mocavo.com have posted an announcement that says (in part), “Today, we are thrilled to announce that for the first time anywhere, the indexes and images for all United States Federal Census are now available for free to everyone.” This is good news for anyone researching U.S. ancestry.

New Records Available to Search at Findmypast

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

This Findmypast Friday marks the release over 154,000 fascinating apprenticeship records from two of London’s historic liveries. This week’s additions also include mortuary register records from the London borough of Southwark, Royal Navy officer’s award index records and over half a million new passenger list records from Victoria, Australia’s most populous state.

Haberdasher and Ironmonger records

Containing over 136,000 records, City of London Haberdashers, Apprentices and Freemen 1526-1933 lists the details of apprentices who trained with the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers in the City of London. Founded in 1516, the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers is one of London’s twelve historic liveries. Haberdashers sold accessory items such as hats, scarves, gloves, shawls, parasols, needles, buttons and thread. They traded from the shops and stalls around Cheapside and probably worshipped together in the old St Paul’s Cathedral in a chapel to St Catherine of Alexandria, who was to become the Fraternity of Haberdashers’ chosen patron saint. Company membership allowed individuals to become a Freeman; a person who was not tied to land as a villein or serf. Apprentices travelled from all over the country to join the company.

Records from the Jersey Archive in the Channel Islands Go Online for the First Time

The Ancestry.com Blog reports that the Jersey, Channel Islands, Wills and Testaments collection covering the years 1663-1948 and the Jersey, Channel Islands, Occupation Registration Cards from World War Two covering the years 1940-1945. Both these collections will be of enormous benefit to anyone who is eager to learn more about their Jersey family history. Some of the most common surnames found in these collections include, De Gruchy, Renouf, Hamon, Amy, Bisson, Querée, Le Brocq, Le Marquand, Le Cornu, and De La Haye.

NEHGS Commemorates Memorial Day with FREE Access to Important Military Databases on AmericanAncestors.org

The following announcement was written by the folks at the New England Historic Genealogical Society:

Family Historians May “Honor the Fallen” by Searching FREE on AmericanAncestors.org for Patriots on the Family Tree Who Served in Colonial Times

May 20, 2015—Boston, Massachusetts—In the spirit of Memorial Day and to make ancestral research even more productive this holiday weekend, AmericanAncestors.org and New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) have made several online military databases accessible FREE to all who wish to search for patriots in early American colonial wars.

New Records Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 2.5 million fascinating Dublin Workhouse records that highlight the devastating impact the great famine had on Irish society. This week’s additions also include baptism and burial records from the English county of Nottinghamshire, birth, marriage and death Index records from Australia’s Northern Territory and millions of historic British newspaper articles.

Dublin Workhouses Records

Containing over 1.5 million records, the Dublin Workhouses Admission & Discharge Registers 1840-1919 list the details of those who passed through the workhouses of the North and South Dublin Unions. Levels of poverty in Ireland were far higher than in England and the workhouse was often an inescapable part of life that would have touched many, if not most Dublin families. The North and South Dublin Unions were among the busiest in Ireland, not simply because they were in the capital but because they often took in paupers from across the country. This was especially true during the years of the Great Famine in the 1840s when crowds of desperate, starving people came to Dublin from all over the country. Given the lack of 19th century census material in Ireland, the registers will be an incredibly valuable resource to those with Irish ancestors. Dublin was the largest point of embarkation from Ireland during the 19th century era of mass Catholic migration and a significant number of those who emigrated would have passed through these workhouses.

FamilySearch Adds More Than 2.9 Million Indexed Records and Images for Australia, Canada, Peru, and the United States

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 2.9 million indexed records and images for Australia, Canada, Peru, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 643,899 images from the Peru, Áncash, Civil Registration, 1888–2005 collection; 608,881 images from the Peru, Junín, Civil Registration, 1881–2005collection; and 531,346 images from the US, Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906–1994 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free atFamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

Irish Lives Remembered FREE Digital Genealogy Magazine

If you have an interest in Irish ancestry, you should check out Irish Lives Remembered. It is an e-magazine with lots of tips and articles about tracing your family tree in Ireland. In fact, the magazine is produced in Ireland as well. The best part is the price tag: FREE.

You can read Irish Lives Remembered online in a web browser or you can download it in PDF format to save and read at your leisure in Windows, Macintosh, Linux, iPad, Android, Kindle, or most any other device. You also can subscribe to Irish Lives Remembered online. With a subscription, you receive one email notice about every two months notifying you of a new edition and providing a link where you my view the new edition online or download it.

The May/June edition has just been released and it contains the following articles:

Kalkaska County (Michigan) Library’s Digital Newspaper Archive

The Kalkaska County Library’s digital newspaper archive, featuring issues of The Leader and Kalkaskian and predecessor newspapers, from 1879 to 2012, is not well publicized. However, if you have family from Kalkaska County, this could be a gold mine.

Quoting from the library’s web site:

“The newspapers in our collection were scanned from microfilm to PDF format utilizing OCR (Optical Character Recognition) technology, enabling historians, professional and amateur alike, to more easily search and discover information.

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