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Findmypast Announces Plans to Publish Cincinnati & Chicago Sacramental Registers Online for the First Time

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Findmypast’s exclusive Catholic Heritage Archive continues to grow

  • New partnership with the Archdioceses of Cincinnati will over 3 million original Sacramental Registers digitized, fully indexed and published online for the very first time
  • A further 1.9 million records covering the Archdiocese of Chicago will also be released in partnership with FamilySearch international.

Leading family history website, Findmypast, has today announced plans to publish over 4.9 Sacramental Registers in partnership with the Archdioceses of Cincinnati and FamilySearch International.

Digitization will soon be underway and over 800,000 fully indexed images of original Cincinnati Catholic baptism, marriage and burial registers containing over 3 million names and spanning the years 1800 to 1953 will be made available online for the first time, only at Findmypast, in 2018.

(+) Why Cloud Computing Makes Sense for Genealogy

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Note: This is an update to an article I published several years ago. The technology of cloud computing has grown rapidly and changed significantly since the article was first published. I decided to update the article to make it more relevant to today’s cloud computing environment.

One of the current buzzwords in the online world is “cloud computing.” You can probably find dozens of definitions of this new technology, but I think the simplest is that cloud computing refers to a computer application running on a distant computer or, more often, in a cluster of computers. Those multiple computers, or servers, often are installed in different data centers around the world, and yet they work in harmony as if they were one very big and very powerful computer.

In fact, if your present computer is showing its age and is slowing down a bit, switching to cloud computing applications is an excellent method of obtaining several more years of productive use from your aging hardware.

Can You Find a Relative of Charles Manson?

Cult leader Charles Manson doesn’t appear to have any relatives on file with prison officials, meaning his body is likely to be left in state custody following his death on Sunday night. This sounds like a challenge for genealogists: find his nearest living relative.

Admittedly, not many would want to admit being related to the 83-year-old murderer serving nine life sentences at California’s Corcoran State Prison.

Charles Milles Manson was born with the name Charles Milles Maddox on November 12, 1934. According to Wikipedia, his mother was an unmarried 16-year-old with various names. She is listed as Kathleen Manson-Bower-Cavender, née Maddox (1918–1973). Manson was born in the General Hospital, in Cincinnati, Ohio. His birth name was first listed as “no name Maddox”. Within weeks, he was called Charles Milles Maddox.

Even After Death, Social Media Still Connects Loved Ones

The Voice of America web site has an interesting article about the online memorials left by recently-deceased computer users. The article states:

“Social media is turning into a vast graveyard for profiles of owners who have passed away, leaving them unattended or as standing memorials. And some experts are urging social networks to do more to help users prepare for their digital deaths.

“There are millions of them – pages that remain on social media sites, and in some cases, automatically update after their owners’ death.

World’s First Online Gallery of Pilgrim Descendants Created by New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS)

The following announcement was written by the folks at the New England Historic Genealogical Society:

American Ancestors Invites Mayflower Passenger Descendants to Commemorate their Pilgrim Heritage with Name and Photo

Interactive Website Reveals Authoritative Accounts of the Lives of Pilgrims and Mayflower Crew Drawn from Years of NEHGS Research

November 19, 2017—Boston, Massachusetts—The New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) has launched a new interactive website that presents the most authoritative biographies to date of the Pilgrims who set sail for a new world 397 years ago—available for free for the first time. The site invites their living descendants to engage with the past by becoming a part of modern Mayflower history.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) The True Expense of Genealogy Research

Postmortem Photography

The Truth You’ve Never Heard About Plimoth Colony and the First Thanksgiving

Book Review: Take Control of Your Digital Legacy

Use a Twitter Bot to Colorize Your Black-And-White Photos in Seconds for Free

Purchase a MyHeritage DNA kit for only $59

A MyHeritage DNA Reunion was Featured Live on Good Morning America

MyHeritage Adds New York Newspapers and an Index to New York Marriage License Records Online

Announcing a New Website Featuring Genealogy Information from Every American Community

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Genealogy Cruises, Online Webinars, United Kingdom, California, Colorado, and Connecticut

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

MyHeritage Adds New York Newspapers and an Index to New York Marriage License Records Online

MyHeritage has just added New York Newspapers, 1806–2007, and the New York Marriage License Index, 1908–1929 to “SuperSearch™, the company’s database containing more than 8.3 billion names.

Newburgh Daily News story about the sinking of the Titanic

4th edition of the Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy is now Available

Val D. Greenwood is one of the best-known and most respected genealogy authors of our time. His book, the Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, is one of the best “how to” manuals for beginning genealogists and advanced researchers alike. It is the text of choice in colleges and universities or wherever courses in American genealogy are taught.

The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy identifies the various classes of records employed in that research, groups them in convenient tables and charts, gives their location, explains their uses, and evaluates each of them in the context of the research process.

“The challenge I give to the genealogist is to reach beyond the vital statistics to a new world of understanding, both of his ancestors and of himself. . . . Someone has said that there is little point in digging up an ancestor if you are not going to make him live”– Val D. Greenwood

Val has updated his classic work and the 4th edition of the Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy is now available from the publisher, Genealogical Publishing Company, at: http://bit.ly/2jEAnse as well as from other genealogy bookstores.

(+) The True Expense of Genealogy Research

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

The world has changed for genealogists in the past two or three decades. Anyone with a computer can now obtain more genealogy information online that what any public library in a town or a small city can provide. The online information is available quickly and conveniently, is usually faster to search, and (in many cases) is available for less money.

I hear many genealogists moan and groan because a particular online genealogy service costs money. The claim often is made that “It should be free!” Comparisons often are made that traveling to a nearby library or archive is free so we shouldn’t pay for the online databases.

I will suggest that such claims are the result of “fuzzy thinking.”

New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

New Royal Welch Fusiliers records, National Archives First World War Medical records and Pension Forms available to search this Findmypast Friday

There are over 423,000 records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

British Army, First World War Soldiers’ Medical Records

Search for your military ancestor in The National Archives’ collection of medical records from the First World War. Containing over 212,000 names, these records will enable you to discover when and where your ancestor was wounded, the nature of their injuries and how long they were held at the medical facility for treatment. Images may provide additional details including notes on the nature of the wounds or diseases you ancestor was treated for. This collection comprises The National Archives’ series, MH106, War Office: First World War Representative Medical Records of Servicemen. They include admissions and discharge records from hospitals, field ambulances, and casualty clearing stations. These records are also available to browse.

British Armed Forces, First World War Widows’ Pension Forms

QromaScan v3 Introduces Natural Language Tagging

I wrote about the QromaScan device earlier. Start at https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Aeogn.com+QromaScan&t=hg&ia=web to see my earlier articles. Now a major new software upgrade is available for QromaScan. Here is the announcement from Qroma LLC:

Create Industry Standard Photo Metadata from Natural Voice Descriptions.

SAN JOSE, California— November 17, 2017— Consumers frustrated by the complexity of scanning and organizing their film based images will have a new option as Silicon Valley-based Qroma LLC announces the availability of QromaScan v3.0 for iOS®. QromaScan captures and organizes photos, slides and negatives in one step using specially designed iPhone® accessories and an innovative voice recognition technology. Version 3 brings a new Natural Language Tagging engine that enables users to describe their photos in their own words and use QromaScan’s cutting edge voice recognition technology to detect and embed photo metadata tags for key details such like the date, location and people. A new Relationship Manager detects the use of common nouns used for describing family members such as ‘mom’ and ‘dad’ and automatically tags the image with their full names.

QromaScan 3 greatly simplifies what was once the tedious process of creating industry standard photo metadata. Powered by machine learning and linguistic parsing, QromaScan 3’s Natural Language Tagging engine can store up to 2,000 characters of the user’s transcribed description of a photo and then automatically generate photo metadata tags for things like dates, places, GPS coordinates, and people names. The transcribed description and detected metadata are embedded into the image where they are recognized and made searchable by any operating system or photo organization software that reads standard EXIF and IPTC metadata, such as Adobe Lightroom CC®, Google Photos or Apple Photos®.

Use a Twitter Bot to Colorize Your Black-And-White Photos in Seconds for Free

Use a Twitter bot to colorize photos? It sounds strange but is true.

If you tweet the Colorise Bot a photograph of a black-and-white photograph, will transform it into a technicolor picture. The best part? It’s super fast, with some images colorized in a matter of seconds. The new tool is the product of two British teenagers, Oli Callaghan and Finnian Anderson. Oli is 18, while Finnian is just 17 years old. The Colorise Bot uses a pre-made neural network that’d been trained on a large dataset of 4.5 million images.

Ah, those teenagers! What will they think of next? When I was 17 years old, I wasn’t thinking about neural networks!

The Truth You’ve Never Heard About Plimoth Colony and the First Thanksgiving

The Thanksgiving story you know probably goes a bit like this: English Pilgrims, seeking religious freedom, landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where they found a rich land full of animals and were greeted by a friendly Indian named Squanto, who taught them how to plant corn.

The true story is more complicated. Once you learn about the real Squanto — also known as Tisquantum — you’ll have a great yarn to tell your family over the Thanksgiving table.

How is it that Squanto knew how to speak perfect English when the Pilgrims arrived?

Announcing a Change on FamilySearch: a New Free Sign-in Process Offers Greater Subscriber Experiences and Benefits

The following announcement was written by the folks at: FamilySearch

Salt Lake City, Utah (16 November 2017), Beginning December 13, 2017, patrons visiting FamilySearch.org will see a prompt to register for a free FamilySearch account or sign in to their existing account to continue enjoying all the free expanded benefits FamilySearch has to offer. Since its launch in 1999, FamilySearch has added millions of users, billions of various historical records, and many fun, new features like Family Tree, Memories, mobile apps, digital books, and dynamic help. In order to accommodate continued growth of these and future free services, FamilySearch must assure all its partners that its content is offered in a safe and secure online environment. Patrons creating a free account and signing in fulfills that need.

Patron sign in will also enable FamilySearch to satisfy the ongoing need for user authentication. This authentication can deliver rich, personalized discovery, collaboration, and help experiences. Simply put, signed-in visitors can access more searchable content and enjoy more personalized services.

A MyHeritage DNA Reunion was Featured Live on Good Morning America

An emotional reunion between a mother and daughter who met for the first time took place today live on Good Morning America, the popular U.S. television program. The reunion happened thanks to MyHeritage DNA.

Angie was a teenage mother who placed her baby Meribeth for adoption in 1986. She never got to hold Meribeth after she gave birth to her, and she always hoped that she was adopted by a loving family. For thirty years, they both wondered about one another. MyHeritage DNA enabled Meribeth and Angie to finally find one another.

Findmypast Announces Plans to Publish Trinity Mirror Archive

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

  • Over 12 million pages from the archives of Trinity Mirror to be digitised and published online for the first time
  • Two-year programme of intensive digitisation will nearly double the newspaper holdings of Findmypast and the British Newspaper Archive

London, 16th November 2017

Leading British family history company Findmypast has announced a ground-breaking two-year programme of intensive digitisation from the archives of Trinity Mirror, the largest private newspaper collection in the UK.

The project will result in the online publication of over 12 million pages, made available online for the very first time at Findmypast, as well as on Findmypast’s sister site, the British Newspaper Archive. This will give family and local historians around the world the opportunity to search and explore a wide variety of historical UK publications that were previously inaccessible to the public.

Nokia Security Report for 2017

Are you concerned about malware (malevolent software), such as viruses, keyloggers, and trojan horse programs? If so, you might want to read a new report from Nokia.

The Nokia Threat Intelligence Report examines malware infections found in mobile and fixed networks worldwide. It provides analysis of data gathered from more than 100 million devices by the Nokia NetGuard Endpoint Security solution. The new report details key security incidents and trends from the first three quarters of 2017. Amongst the findings:

  • Devices using the Android operating system were the most likely to be infected this year, according to Nokia research.
  • Android was the #1 target for Malware, about 1% of all Android devices will be infected, an increase from 2016. This means 0.94% of all Android devices were infected, slightly above Google’s 2016 Q4 estimate of 0.71%.
  • Out of all infected devices, 68.50% were Androids, 27.96% ran on Windows, and 3.54% used iOS.

Announcing a New Website Featuring Genealogy Information from Every American Community

Here is an interesting announcement I received this morning. I have briefly looked at the site but haven’t really been able to determine its usefulness. If you have used the Global Research Library Inc., please post your comments below.

The Global Research Library claims to have genealogical records for every part of America as well as most foreign countries. It has some free information available but most of the records require a paid subscription to access. Subscriptions cost $25 US dollars for individuals with higher fees for libraries, societies, and other institutions. Of course, individuals also may access it for free by visiting a nearby library or society that has paid for a subscription.

The announcement describes the Global Research Library Inc. as:

“—primarily an educational portal, covering virtually all subjects in more than a hundred languages. Our research engine is designed for schools, colleges, and universities, as well as individuals who want to learn more.

The Best Free Online File Converters for All Your Formatting Needs

Have you ever received a file or created one of your own that needed to be in a different format? Whether it’s from PDF to DOC, JPG to BMP, or MP3 to WAV, documents, images, audio and video files can be converted easier than you think.

An article by Sandy Stachowiak in the MakeUseOf web site describes seven different online services that convert all sorts of text, graphics, audio, and eve video files from one format. All of them are cloud-based so there is no software to install in your computer. These seven services all work on Windows, Macintosh, Chromebooks, Linux, iPads, Android tablets, and most any other kind of computer that has a web browser.

Best of all, they are free for personal use.

You can find the article at: http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/free-online-file-converters.