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Fold3 WWII U.S. Draft Registration Card Collection Expanded

Fold3 has added four new states to the company’s collection of U.S. WWII Draft Registration Cards. The collection now contains cards from Montana, Kansas, Pennsylvania, and Oregon. The cards in this collection are registration cards for the draft and do not necessarily indicate that the individual ever served in the military.

Thousands of Ottoman-Era Photographs from Turkey are now Online

If you have ancestors from Turkey, you will be interested in a new online collection of photographs. The digitization project focused on photographs from the nineteenth century until World War I (Series I–VIII), resulting in 3,750 individual records of digital files.

Pierre de Gigord Collection of Photographs of the Ottoman Empire and the Republic of Turkey, 1850-1958

French collector Pierre de Gigord traveled to Turkey and collected thousands of Ottoman-era photographs in a variety of media and formats. The resulting Pierre de Gigord Collection is now housed in the Getty Research Institute, which recently digitized over 12,000 of the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century photographs, making them available to study and download for free online.

The Cousin Explainer

Trying to determine all the relationships of all your relatives at a Christmas gathering? A tea towel can help.

As described on the web site where you can order the towel:

“Second cousin once removed, or first cousin twice removed? Calculating cousin-hood has never been easier with this brilliant tea towel. Finally you can establish which of your cousins are once, twice or even thrice removed. A hand lettered design by Geoff Sawers.”

(+) How to Watch “Who Do You Think You Are?” on the TLC Network without Cable

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

The most popular television program amongst genealogists in the United States probably is Who Do You Think You Are? Admittedly, I don’t have statistics to prove its popularity, but my conversations and the email messages I receive from genealogists mention that program more often than any other.

Who Do You Think You Are? is broadcast on the TLC Network, a service normally available only on cable television channels and on satellite television. That’s a problem for anyone who doesn’t have one of those services.

NOTE: That includes me. I “cut the cable” a few weeks ago when my local cable company sent me a notice saying that the company was going to increase my monthly bill significantly. I reacted by immediately calling the cable company and demanding they cancel my subscription to cable television but keep my subscription to the company’s high-speed broadband Internet service. Actually, this is the second time I have “cut the cable.” I did the same thing a few years ago when I lived in a different place and had cable television service provided by a different company.

Luckily, for me and for other genealogists, there are multiple methods of legally watching each episode of Who Do You Think You Are?

On the Web

New Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 10, 2018

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch added over 8 million indexed records from Ireland, England, Peru, the United States, and Ukraine.Of the records, 4.4 million originate from the 1911 Ireland Census. In the United States, records come from Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, Washington, West Virginia, and The Veteran’s Administration.

Research these free new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

Report on Josh Duhamel’s appearance on “Who Do You Think You Are?”

Unsolved: The Murders of Tupac and the Notorious B.I.G. star Josh Duhamel was the celebrity guest on this week’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are?. He found some unnerving information about one of his distant ancestors, including interrogation and torture.

Duhamel traveled to England to investigate the extraordinary life of his twelve times great-grandfather, Thomas Norton. A visit to the Tower of London, the U.K. College of Arms, and Cambridge University resulted in Duhamel examining numerous original documents written in the 1500s.

You can see a bit more of the program in the following video:

(+) Boolean Basics – Part #2

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

NOTE #1: This is part #2 of a 2-part article.

Part #1 of this article introduced the concept of Boolean search terms for use on Google. That article is still available to Plus Edition subscribers at https://eognplus.com/2018/12/10/boolean-basics-part-1/. You might want to read that article again now to refresh it in your mind before proceeding with new topics. This week I will describe several advanced topics.

MyHeritage DNA Testing Featured on the Dr. Phil Show

U.S. residents are probably familiar with Dr. Phil’s television show. Dr. Phil says he was always aware of his Irish ancestry, but it wasn’t until he submitted a simple cheek swab to MyHeritage DNA that he realized there was more to his lineage. He used MyHeritage to test his ancestry.

“Dr. Phil, we found that you have three distinct ethnicities in six distinct countries,” says MyHeritage consultant Yvette Corporon.

World War I Newspaper Clippings, 1914 to 1926, are Now Available Online

Quoting from the Library of Congress web site:

“The massive collection, World War History: Newspaper Clippings, 1914 to 1926, is now fully digitized and freely available on the Library of Congress website. The 79,621 pages are packed with war-related front pages, illustrated feature articles, editorial cartoons, and more. You can search by keywords, browse the content chronologically, and download pages.

Genealogy Data Helps Track Back Rare Disease Alleles to Quebec Founder Families

A Canadian team has harnessed genealogical data from Quebec to retrace the history of a rare recessive disease called “chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia” (CAID), using a computational approach for inferring rare allele transmission history.

Researchers from McGill University and elsewhere used their software package, known as ISGen, to analyze past transmission of CAID alleles with the help of high-quality genealogical data for more than 3.4 million individuals of European ancestry in the Canadian province. The approach traced the rare heart and digestive condition back to French settlers who arrived in the region in the early 17th century, the team reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

You can read more in the research team’s announcement at: http://bit.ly/2Svhp3k. A free registration may be required, however.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Boolean Basics – Part #1

Book Review: How We Survive Here

The 2019 Version of Heredis is Now Available

If You Don’t Want to Deal with Family Skeletons, Don’t Look in the DNA Closet

Mitochondria Reportedly Can Come From Fathers Too

Jewish Cemeteries in Poland to be Mapped and Entered into an Online Database

Photopea: A Free Alternative to Photoshop

FamilyTreeWebinars.com Adds Captioning to Hundreds of Genealogy and DNA Education Classes

TLC Releases a Bit of Information about the Future “Who Do You Think You Are?” Episodes

(+) Boolean Basics – Part #1

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman.

NOTE #1: This is part #1 of a 2-part article.

Probably all genealogists have used Google for genealogy searches. For many of us, we go to https://www.google.com, enter the name of an ancestor, click on SEARCH and hope that a reference appears that points to the person we wish to find. Sometimes the name search works well, and sometimes it doesn’t. When it doesn’t work, many genealogists give up and move on to something else. This is especially true with common names when a standard Google search may find hundreds of people with the same name. However, with just a little bit of effort, you may be able to quickly narrow the search to a single person or at least to a manageably small group of people. The trick here is to use some search terms defined 164 years ago.

Josh Duhamel to be the Celebrity Guest on This Week’s Episode of “Who Do You Think You Are?”

Josh Duhamel, “Transformers” star, will be featured in this Tuesday’s edition of the U.S. version of Who Do You Think You Are? The show is broadcast on TLC, available primarily on cable and satellite television services as well as on a delayed basis in the future on the program’s web site at: https://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are.

Last week’s episode with Mandy Moore is now available online at the same web address: https://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are.

Godfrey Memorial Library Now Has a New Web Site

You can check it out at: http://www.godfrey.org:

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

New Records Available To Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

British Army, Honourable Artillery Company

Over 18,000 new Index Cards and POW records covering the years 1939 to 1945 have been added to the collection. The Index cards record brief and abbreviated details of service histories while the POW records list the location & date of capture, liberation, escape or death as well prisoner and camp numbers for HAC members held by German or Italian forces.

Did your ancestor serve with the oldest regiment in the British Army? Discover multiple records for one ancestor. Explore a selection of rare photographs of the HAC from World War 1, full admission and regimental records for 1848 to 1922 and much more. Most of the collection is focused on the years 1908 to 1922. Every record will include a digitised image of the original source and a transcript. The amount of information listed will vary depending on date and nature of the document.

Cheshire Diocese of Chester Parish Baptisms 1538-1911

FGS Announces Election of New Officers and Directors

The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:

December 6, 2018 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies is pleased to announce the results of its recent election. Re-elected to a two-year term as President was Faye Jenkins Stallings. Joining the Executive Committee effective January 1, 2019, for two-year terms are:

Secretary: Dennis VanderWerff (California)
Vice President, Administration: Mark Olsen (Utah)

Joining FGS as Directors for a three-year term are:

Director: Steve Fulton (Ontario)
Director: Sara Gredler (Texas)
Director: Mike Mansfield (Utah)
Director: Stephen C. Young (Utah)

Newgate Prison Records from TheGenealogist Reveal Thieves and Marie Antoinette’s Libeler

The following announcement was written by TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist is adding to its Court and Criminal Records collection with the release of almost 150,000 entries for prisoners locked up in Newgate prison along with any alias they were known by as well as the names of their victims. Sourced from the HO 26 Newgate Prison Registers held by The National Archives, these documents were created over the years 1791 to 1849.

Newgate Gaol, London from TheGenealogist’s Image Archive

The Newgate Prison Registers give family history researchers details of ancestors who were imprisoned in the fearsome building that once stood next to the Old Bailey in the City of London. The records reveal the names of prisoners, offences the prisoner had been convicted for, the date of their trial and where they were tried. The records also give the name of the victims and any alias that the criminals may have used before.

Use the Newgate Prison Registers records to:

Announcing a 72-Hour Scan-a-Thon: Genealogists are Invited to Participate in Scanning Marathon

The following announcement was written by WikiTree and the GeneaBloggersTRIBE:

December 6, 2018: On the weekend of January 11-14, 2019, WikiTree and GeneaBloggersTRIBE will kick off the new year by hosting a 72-hour image scanning marathon. Genealogists and family historians from around the world are invited to participate.

The goal of the Scan-a-Thon is to scan and upload photos and other items such as letters, postcards, funeral cards, and primary documents. Like a marathon, this is a competition to see who can do the most, but most participants won’t be serious competitors. Most will be doing it for the sake of preserving family history.

To add to the fun and collaborative atmosphere, participants will be organized into teams by geography and genealogical interest, such as Team Acadia, Nor’Easters, Windsor Warriors, Flying Dutchmen and Legacy Heirs.