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New Records Available To Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

British Army, Honourable Artillery Company

Over 18,000 new Index Cards and POW records covering the years 1939 to 1945 have been added to the collection. The Index cards record brief and abbreviated details of service histories while the POW records list the location & date of capture, liberation, escape or death as well prisoner and camp numbers for HAC members held by German or Italian forces.

Did your ancestor serve with the oldest regiment in the British Army? Discover multiple records for one ancestor. Explore a selection of rare photographs of the HAC from World War 1, full admission and regimental records for 1848 to 1922 and much more. Most of the collection is focused on the years 1908 to 1922. Every record will include a digitised image of the original source and a transcript. The amount of information listed will vary depending on date and nature of the document.

Cheshire Diocese of Chester Parish Baptisms 1538-1911

FGS Announces Election of New Officers and Directors

The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:

December 6, 2018 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies is pleased to announce the results of its recent election. Re-elected to a two-year term as President was Faye Jenkins Stallings. Joining the Executive Committee effective January 1, 2019, for two-year terms are:

Secretary: Dennis VanderWerff (California)
Vice President, Administration: Mark Olsen (Utah)

Joining FGS as Directors for a three-year term are:

Director: Steve Fulton (Ontario)
Director: Sara Gredler (Texas)
Director: Mike Mansfield (Utah)
Director: Stephen C. Young (Utah)

Newgate Prison Records from TheGenealogist Reveal Thieves and Marie Antoinette’s Libeler

The following announcement was written by TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist is adding to its Court and Criminal Records collection with the release of almost 150,000 entries for prisoners locked up in Newgate prison along with any alias they were known by as well as the names of their victims. Sourced from the HO 26 Newgate Prison Registers held by The National Archives, these documents were created over the years 1791 to 1849.

Newgate Gaol, London from TheGenealogist’s Image Archive

The Newgate Prison Registers give family history researchers details of ancestors who were imprisoned in the fearsome building that once stood next to the Old Bailey in the City of London. The records reveal the names of prisoners, offences the prisoner had been convicted for, the date of their trial and where they were tried. The records also give the name of the victims and any alias that the criminals may have used before.

Use the Newgate Prison Registers records to:

Announcing a 72-Hour Scan-a-Thon: Genealogists are Invited to Participate in Scanning Marathon

The following announcement was written by WikiTree and the GeneaBloggersTRIBE:

December 6, 2018: On the weekend of January 11-14, 2019, WikiTree and GeneaBloggersTRIBE will kick off the new year by hosting a 72-hour image scanning marathon. Genealogists and family historians from around the world are invited to participate.

The goal of the Scan-a-Thon is to scan and upload photos and other items such as letters, postcards, funeral cards, and primary documents. Like a marathon, this is a competition to see who can do the most, but most participants won’t be serious competitors. Most will be doing it for the sake of preserving family history.

To add to the fun and collaborative atmosphere, participants will be organized into teams by geography and genealogical interest, such as Team Acadia, Nor’Easters, Windsor Warriors, Flying Dutchmen and Legacy Heirs.

FamilyTreeWebinars.com Adds Captioning to Hundreds of Genealogy and DNA Education Classes

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilyTreeWebinars.com:

December 5, 2018

Legacy Family Tree Webinars, the leading genealogy and DNA webinar platform, announced today the addition of closed captioning to its service. Implemented as a full human-curated transcription via synced subtitles, closed captioning is now available as an option for all live and members-only webinar recordings released since May 1, 2018. In addition, the most popular 50 webinars on the platform and all MyHeritage-specific webinars have been captioned. Legacy will add captioning to all new webinars going forward.

“We are committed to providing the best genealogy and DNA education for all, including people who are hard of hearing,” said Geoff Rasmussen, founder and host of Legacy Family Tree Webinars. “Captioning is an excellent way to make online education more accessible, and is also a benefit to non-native English speakers who struggle with spoken English but have an easier time with written English”.

NEHGS Provides a Look at Famous Relatives of George H. W. Bush

The following announcement was written by the New England Historic Genealogical Society:

As Tributes Pour in Celebrating the Life of the 41st President, Genealogists at New England Historic Genealogical Society Provide a Look at Famous Relatives of George H. W. Bush

Boston, Massachusetts—December 5, 2018—As tributes pour in following the death of George Herbert Walker Bush, genealogists at New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS), who have long studied the ancestry of all U S presidents, shed light on the extensive family background of the beloved 41st U S President. The world- renowned genealogist Gary Boyd Roberts, NEHGS Senior Research Scholar Emeritus, has documented the family history of the late President Bush extensively:

Photopea: A Free Alternative to Photoshop

NOTE: This isn’t a true genealogy article. However, many genealogists also collect old and new family photographs and those photos often need “improvements” performed by photo editing software. If you have an interest in photo restoration, I suggest you read on.

For many years, the most famous photo editing software has been Photoshop, produced by Adobe. In fact, it is a very powerful product, available for both Macintosh and Windows, and is used by professional photographers everywhere. There is one huge drawback to Photoshop, however: it is very expensive. The later versions of Photoshop are available only as monthly subscriptions. For a single user, the price is $20.99 US per month. That’s $251.88 US per year, and most subscribers will want to use it for several years. In short, you can expect to pay $1,000 US or more over the next few years for the use of Photoshop.

One popular substitute has been Photoshop Elements, a lower priced product with fewer capabilities. But even Photoshop Elements is too expensive for many people at $99.99. Luckily, Photoshop Elements isn’t subscription based and won’t require payment year after year.

However, there are several FREE competitors that perform most of the same functions as Photoshop. For years, GIMP (an abbreviation for the “GNU Image Manipulation Program”) has been available as a very powerful image editor FREE of charge. The biggest drawback of GIMP is its unusual user interface. Learning to use all the power in GIMP takes many hours of study.

If you don’t like GIMP and you don’t want to pay an exorbitant price for Photoshop, you might want to look at Photopea.

The 2019 Version of Heredis is Now Available

Heredis is a vary popular genealogy program, available for both Windows and Macintosh. I believe most of the Heredis customers are in Europe although the company has been gaining new customers in North America and elsewhere. Heredis can display its menus in many different languages.

I have written before about Heredis. To see my previous articles, start at: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Aeogn.com+heredis&t=h_&ia=web.

Now the producing company has released a major new update to the program, called Heredis 2019. Here is a list of some of the new features:

If You Don’t Want to Deal with Family Skeletons, Don’t Look in the DNA Closet

Amy Dickinson is an American newspaper columnist who writes the syndicated advice column Ask Amy. In a recent column, she published a letter from a reader asking how to handle a family surprise: upon having her DNA tested, the writer discovered she had a half-sibling that she was not aware of previously. She then shared this bit of information with her family, including with both of her parents.

The information was not well received.

You can read this rather interesting letter and Amy Dickinson’s advice in a number of newspapers, including the Detroit Free Press at: http://bit.ly/2QxfdL6.

Comment by Dick Eastman: I certainly cannot compete with Amy Dickinson’s nationally-syndicated advice column but I will offer one piece of advice to genealogists: If your research finds a something that was previously not widely known within the family, you might want to stop and consider the implications before you broadcast that information to your relatives. Do you really HAVE to tell everyone? or anyone?

Report on Mandy Moore’s appearance on “Who Do You Think You Are?”

Mandy Moore, an American singer, songwriter and actress, was the guest on the first episode of the season on the U.S. version of Who Do You Think You Are? Her discoveries turned out to be much different from what she had imagined they would be.

Mandy Moore grew up proud thinking she had deep roots in England. But she was left reeling on the season premiere of Who Do You Think You Are? as she traced her family tree instead to Australia and the ‘hell on earth’ of workhouses in Ireland.

New Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 3, 2018

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch added an astounding 47.2 million indexed records from 38 of the United States, and some from the Brazil Civil Registration Records. Over 11 million records come from the United States 1930 Census. Other records included the states of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachussetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Research these free new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

Book Review: How We Survive Here

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

How We Survive Here
by Claire Gebben. Published by Coffeetown Press. 2018. 319 pages.

Claire Gebben remembers her grandmother’s steadfast practice of writing letters back to her family still living in the old country, in the Freinsheim region of Germany. With her grandmother’s passing, Ms. Gebben’s parents continued the tradition. Now a third-generation letter-writer, Ms. Gebben took up emailing her German cousin, Angela Weber, whose strong interest in the family complemented that of Ms. Gebben’s.

Eventually, Ms. Weber made the trip from Germany to the United States to meet her American cousin, bringing with her a treasure: a stack of old family letters that had lain tucked away in a German family attic. The two opened and pored over the letters, now benefiting with Ms. Weber’s keen translational skill. As the events, locations, and happenings of their ancestors’ lives came apparent, Ms. Gebben was moved to memorialize their fates using the letters as markers for the episodes of their days.

Mitochondria Reportedly Can Come From Fathers Too

If this research is verified by others, this could turn out to be revolutionary. In some cases, mitochondrial DNA reportedly can be inherited from fathers.

Scientists and geneticists have always believed that mitochondrial DNA is inherited directly from your mother’s cells, which means there’s no paternal component. This is a big deal for anthropologists and geneticists, because these scientists use mitochondrial DNA to trace back our history through the generations.

A group of researchers found three unrelated families where individuals had mitochondrial DNA from both parents. A total of 17 people across these three families were affected, suggesting that mitochondria aren’t as exclusively maternal as scientists believed.

Uttarakhand Genealogy Tourism Packages Announced

If you have ancestors from Uttarakhand, a state in the northern part of India, you may be interested in the new ‘Gotra tourism’ packages offered to tourists. (Gotra is the Hindi word for “clan lineage.”)

Announcing the plan a few days ago, Chief Minister of Uttarakhand, Trivendra Singh Rawat, said that the idea is to encourage visitors to come to the Himalayan state to update their family records and also visit places associated with the sages after whom the principal gotras are named.

TLC Releases a Bit of Information about the Future “Who Do You Think You Are?” Episodes

If you are in the US, you probably are aware of the genealogy-oriented television series, Who Do You Think You Are? The program’s producers at TLC have released a brief peek at the first episode to be broadcast in this year’s series, featuring Mandy Moore, an American singer, songwriter and actress.

Mandy found out that not all her ancestors came from the countries she expected. You can learn more in an article at: http://bit.ly/2Ru0i1C.

Also on board for new episodes are Josh Duhamel, Matthew Morrison, and Regina King. The Who Do You Think You Are? season premiere starts this evening, Monday, December 3, 10pm Eastern time/9pm Central, on TLC.

Ohio Genealogical Society Issues Call for Lecture Proposals for 2020 Annual Conference

The following announcement was written by the Ohio Genealogical Society:

December 1, 2018—Bellville, Ohio: The Ohio Genealogical Society (OGS) announces a request for lecture proposals for the 2020 conference to be held April 29-May 2, 2020, at Kalahari Resort and Convention Center in Sandusky, Ohio.

Topics being considered include: Ohio history, its records, and repositories; ethnic (African American, German, Irish, Polish, etc.); religious groups; migration into, within, and out of Ohio; origins of early Ohio settlers, New England Research, the Firelands/Connecticut Reserve, and the Old Northwest Territory. Other topics of interest that will be considered: land and military records; technology, including DNA (all levels of DNA research); mobile devices and apps; methodology, analysis, and problem solving in genealogical research.

Jewish Cemeteries in Poland to be Mapped and Entered into an Online Database

An article in the Israel National News states:

“The Polish government will place border markers in some 1,400 Jewish cemeteries in Poland. This was agreed upon between Polish Culture Minister Piotr Gliński and Poland’s Chief Rabbi and Standing Committee of the Conference of European Rabbis member Rabbi Mordechai Schudrich.

“According to the agreement, all the cemeteries will be mapped and placed in a database that will be available to the public, and border markers will be placed at all the cemeteries’ corners.”

You can read more in the Israel National News at http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/255636.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Consider the Source: Original, Derivative, or Copy

MyHeritage LIVE 2018: Lectures are Now Online

It’s Almost 2019. Do You Know Where Your Photos Are?

Reclaim The Records Filed a New York State Freedom of Information Lawsuit and Won Access to the New York State Marriage Index, then Filed a New Lawsuit About It

A Proposal to Make Money by Selling Your DNA Information

New Records on FamilySearch from November 2018

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch expanded its free online archives in November 2018 with almost 90 million new indexed family history records and almost 300,000 digital images from around the world. New historical records were added from Benin, Chile, Costa Rica, The Dominican Republic, England, Germany, Honduras, Ireland, Lesotho, Liberia, Nicaragua, Peru, and the United States, which includes California, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Native American Enrollment Records, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington. New digital images were added from BillionGraves .

Find your ancestors using these free archives online, including birth, marriage, death, and church records. Millions of new genealogy records are added each month to make your search easier.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Colorado, Maryland, Missouri, and Ohio

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.