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Book Review: The Missing Man

The following book review was written by Dina C. Carson and Bobbi King:

The Missing Man
By Nathan Dylan Goodwin. Self-published. 2017. 132 pages.

Reviewed by Dina C. Carson and Bobbi King

Morton Farrier, forensic genealogist, is back with a new, much more personal case to solve.

Will a three-week honeymoon in America be long enough for him to find his biological father and discover the secret he is keeping? What will the records in Boston untangle? A former life? A former wife?

Morton’s investigation will lead him through a twisted tale of family, mysterious fires and murder! What could lead him to his elusive father when disappearing is the family business?

New Historic Records On FamilySearch: Week of April 24, 2017

SALT LAKE CITY, UT— This week nearly 2 million free indexed historic records were published in FamilySearch’s United States collections including significant new vital records for Rhode Island, Maine and Connecticut. Three million historic record images were added for Italy (Benevento, Brescia, Napoli, and Trapani), along with additions to England, Ghana, Poland, South Africa, Sweden, and Pennsylvania. Search these new free records and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below. Find and share this announcement easily online in the FamilySearch Newsroom.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 782,000 new records available to search this weekend, including;

Kent Baptisms

Over 18,000 records have been added to our collection of Kent Baptisms. The new additions cover the parishes of from Bapchild, Brompton, Chatham, New Gillingham, Wingham and Wittersham. Kent Baptisms spans the years 1538 to 1988 and covers 127 parishes across the English County. Each record includes a transcript of the original source material that will allow you to find out when your ancestor was born, when and where they were baptised, their residence, parent’s names and father’s occupation. A number may also reveal additional information such as the mother’s maiden name and/or additional notes.

Kent Banns

TheGenealogist Releases over 100,000 Parish Records and Thousands of Voter Records

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

The People’s Will, Voting by Ballot at a Parliamentary Election from TheGenealogist Image archive

In time for the snap general election, TheGenealogist is adding to its Polls and Electoral records by publishing online a new collection of Poll books ranging from the late 19th century to the early 20th century.

These new records released today offer a tantalising snapshot of our ancestors interaction with the Church and the State of the past.

Findmypast Encourage Budding Genealogists to Get Started with Five Days of Free Access to Over 1.8 Billion Essential Records

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

  • From Thursday 27th April until 1st May 2017, over 1.9 billion birth marriage, death & and census records will be completely free to search and explore at Findmypast
  • This includes 595 million UK BMDs, the largest collection available online, over 80 million exclusive parish records you won’t find anywhere else, over 13 million Catholic Sacramental Registers covering England, Ireland, Scotland & the US, and over 168 million United States Marriages

London, UK, 27th April 2017

Findmypast is encouraging fledgling family historians to start their journey of discovery by providing five days of free access to their entire collection of birth, marriage, death and census records. From 09:00 BST, 27th April until 23:00 BST, May 1st 2017, all record matches on Findmypast Family trees and the 1.9 billion records they cover will be completely free to view and explore.

How to Manage Your Family’s Digital Assets

I am proud to announce that an article I wrote is now available on FamilySearch.orgHow to Manage Your Family’s Digital Assets. The article begins:

“In our digitally integrated lives, we create and share most of our pictures and home videos with snazzy digital cameras, incredible smart phones, or other easily portable devices. We download music purchases and perhaps even keep only digital receipts of our purchases through photos or emails. Someone said, “That [choose your device of choice] is so versatile that it can take pictures, chop celery, and keep us in touch with relatives as far away as Samoa.”

“Now that we have all these digital devices, have we figured out what to do with the fruits of those devices—the mounds of digital files and sources we amass daily, weekly, monthly, yearly? What do we do with all our personal digital content that makes up our digital lives?”

You can read the entire article at: http://media.familysearch.org/how-to-manage-your-familys-digital-assets/.

How to Find Someone Who Has the Book You Seek

Perhaps the full title of this article should be How to Find Someone Who Has the Book You Seek and Also Let Everyone Else Know About the Books You Own and Also Catalog Your Own Personal Library with Minimal Effort.

You can find dozens of programs that will help you catalog your personal book collection. Some of these will create a list that you can print or store on your own computer or store on your smartphone or even upload to the World Wide Web. Some products also keep track of the books you want to read (sometimes called a wish list) and will also keep track of books you have loaned out to others, including the date loaned. Some cataloging products will also track other media, such as CD and DVD disks, video games, and more. However, one online service does all that and lots more. You can access your information from a web browser on a desktop computer, a laptop computer, or even from a smartphone. The last feature is very useful when you are at a bookstore or flea market or genealogy conference and are wondering, “Do I already have that book?” Best of all, you can share your catalog with others and also see what others have in their collections. The service is available either free of charge or for very low fees.

South Dakota State Historical Society to Digitize more Historical Newspapers

The South Dakota State Historical Society has announced that more historical newspapers will be digitized as part of a federal grant.

The following is the announcement from the South Dakota State Historical Society:

Newspaper digitization advisory board selects newspapers to digitize for federal grant

PIERRE, S.D. – The South Dakota State Historical Society has announced that more historical newspapers will be digitized as part of a federal grant.

In September the State Historical Society-Archives was awarded a second round of grant funding in the amount of $240,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to continue digitizing historical newspapers.

On the Road Again

By the time you read these words, I should be either en route to or have arrived in Massachusetts. I will be attending the New England Regional Genealogical Consortium’s conference in Springfield, Massachusetts.

The event is sponsored by a long, long  list of participating genealogy societies. You can see the list at: http://www.nergc.org. Past NERGC conferences have attracted 800 or more attendees. I suspect this year’s event will be at least as popular.

Book Reviews: Three More Resources for Georgia Researchers

The following book reviews were written by Bobbi King:

Families of Southeastern Georgia
By Jack N. Averitt. Genealogical Publishing Co. 2009. 457 pages.
Originally published as Volume III of Georgia’s Coastal Plain: Family and Personal History (New York, 1964). The numerous illustrations in the original book are not reproduced in this reprint.

This is a book of strictly biographical sketches; no historical background text, timelines, nor Georgia history.

There are approximately 1,000 biographical descriptions of families offering names, places and dates of birth, spouses, marriage places and dates, children, parents, and places and dates of deaths. Additional personal information commonly includes careers, civic affiliations, church affiliations, and military service, some back to the Civil War.

The index contains approximately 3500 names.

Volumes I and II of the series contain historical information, while Volume III contains the family summaries, hence the reprint of only Volume III. A complete list of the families named can be found at Genealogical.com, Search: Families of Southeastern Georgia.


1864 Census for Re-organizing the Georgia Militia
by Nancy J. Cornell. Genealogical Publishing Co. 2000. 843 pages.

Incomplete Birth Certificates Create a Bureaucratic Morass in Many Places

I had to smile a bit today when reading an article in the Boston Globe about the “problem” of incomplete birth records. It seems the city of Boston has many birth records from years ago where the baby’s name is simply recorded as “baby girl” or “baby boy.” The reporter wrote, “A generation ago — when more families had six or more children — babies without official first names were surprisingly common. Overwhelmed new parents would leave the hospital without completing birth certificate paperwork.”

You can read more in the article by Andrew Ryan in the Boston Globe at: http://bit.ly/2pedZ7w. The same article tells how to amend a record and add a first name by providing documentation.

Actually, the “problem” is not unique to Boston nor to any particular area of the United States. An experienced genealogist probably can tell you of numerous similar examples. I have seen it many times, especially in the case of my mother and her siblings.

To Celebrate DNA Day, MyHeritage is Offering a Discount on Every DNA Test Kit Ordered

Today, April 25, is DNA Day. To celebrate, MyHeritage is offering the readers of this newsletter a discount on every MyHeritage DNA purchase between now and Sunday, April 30th. If you have been thinking of testing your DNA, or the DNA of one of your relatives, now might be a good time to do so.

The offer is free shipping on every MyHeritage DNA purchase. With this promotion, worth $12, and the introductory price of $79, you can obtain the best deal possible.

Again, this special offer will be valid until Sunday, April 30th, and in order to take advantage of it, you will need to enter the following coupon code in the DNA checkout page (after clicking on “Get a coupon code?”):

eogn_dnaday

DNA Day: 11 Things You Might Not Know About DNA

Today, April 25, marks National DNA Day, a day commemorating the enormous achievement of University of Cambridge scientists James Watson and Francis Crick in discovering the structure of DNA for which they were later awarded a Nobel Prize. DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is a giant molecule containing the coded instructions of life. Watson and Crick were the first to discover the double helix structure of DNA, changing the face of biology forever.

In honor of DNA Day, the MyHeritage Blog has a list of 11 things about DNA that you may not have known before. One that caught my eye is, “Over 99% of our DNA sequence is the same as other humans.” We all are more alike than what I realized.

You can read this and the other 10 facts on the MyHeritage Blog at: https://blog.myheritage.com/2017/04/dna-day-11-things-you-might-not-know-about-dna.

Announcing the Release of Legacy Family Tree Version 9

Legacy Family Tree has long been one of the most popular genealogy programs for Windows Now the company has announced a major new upgrade.

Version 9 adds Hinting, FindAGrave.com tools, Stories, Hashtags, DNA Charts and more. Best of all, the company is offering a discounted price for anyone upgrading from an earlier version.

You can read all the details and even watch an online video describing Legacy 9 at: http://bit.ly/2pf4rv0.

IDG Introduces their Newest of In-Brief Research Guide: “Pennsylvania Genealogy” by Elissa Scalise Powell

The following announcement was written by the In-Depth Genealogist:

The In-Depth Genealogist (IDG) is pleased to present their newest in-brief research guide in the research series by writer, Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, entitled “An In-Brief Guide to Pennsylvania Genealogy.” Elissa is a western Pennsylvania researcher and co-director of the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). She is a past-president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and coordinator of the IGHR “Professional Genealogy” course since 2007 She was an instructor for Boston University’s Genealogical Research Certificate course (2008-2016) and co-coordinator of SLIG’s 2013 “Credentialing: AG, CG, or Both?” course. Elissa’s familiarity with Pennsylvania history and research helps make this research guide a real value to anyone wanting to go further with their Pennsylvania ancestors.

Pennsylvania State Archives Training in June

The following announcement was written by the Pennsylvania State Archives:

The Pennsylvania State Archives (PSA), in partnership with Old Economy Village and the Lycoming County Historical Society, is pleased to announce the Spring 2017 Archives Without Tears workshop schedule. The workshops will be held June 6–7 at Old Economy Village, Ambridge, PA and June 15–16 at the Thomas T. Taber Museum of the Lycoming County Historical Society, Williamsport, PA. These are the only sessions planned for 2017. Registration information is attached.

Another Amusing Obituary: Christine Kockinis

The obituary for Christine Kockinis displays a great sense of humor. Here is one excerpt: “Christine requested that six players from the Sacramento Kings be her pallbearers so that they could let her down one last time.”

You can read the entire obituary in The Sacramento Bee at: http://bit.ly/2p7kKrV.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Essential Things I Never Travel Without – Part #1

(+) Will a New Network Replace Our Present World Wide Web?

Book Reviews of Three Books by Michael A. Ports Concerning Georgia History and Genealogy

Question: What Race Am I?

Genealogy Applications for Chromebooks

DNA Day Sales 2017

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Online Webinars, Prince Edward Island, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Mississippi, and Tennessee

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

(+) Essential Things I Never Travel Without – Part #1

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

I travel a lot. It is only April, and I have already been overseas twice this year. In a 12-month period I am visiting Iceland, Denmark, England, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, and China, two trips to Salt Lake City, multiple trips to Massachusetts, and one trip each to Ohio and Pennsylvania, as well as several Caribbean islands. I may add some more trips to the schedule before the year is over.

Some of these trips are for business, but quite a few are for personal reasons. Several trips are to attend genealogy conferences. I also get to spend a bit of time researching my own family tree occasionally. Whenever possible, I try to combine business trips with a few days of vacation, especially when I have an opportunity to go to places I have never visited before. That includes most of my trips overseas.

I have become a fanatic on lightweight packing.