This Newsletter is Sponsored by MyHeritage

MyHeritage

New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

New Royal Welch Fusiliers records, National Archives First World War Medical records and Pension Forms available to search this Findmypast Friday

There are over 423,000 records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

British Army, First World War Soldiers’ Medical Records

Search for your military ancestor in The National Archives’ collection of medical records from the First World War. Containing over 212,000 names, these records will enable you to discover when and where your ancestor was wounded, the nature of their injuries and how long they were held at the medical facility for treatment. Images may provide additional details including notes on the nature of the wounds or diseases you ancestor was treated for. This collection comprises The National Archives’ series, MH106, War Office: First World War Representative Medical Records of Servicemen. They include admissions and discharge records from hospitals, field ambulances, and casualty clearing stations. These records are also available to browse.

British Armed Forces, First World War Widows’ Pension Forms

QromaScan v3 Introduces Natural Language Tagging

I wrote about the QromaScan device earlier. Start at https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Aeogn.com+QromaScan&t=hg&ia=web to see my earlier articles. Now a major new software upgrade is available for QromaScan. Here is the announcement from Qroma LLC:

Create Industry Standard Photo Metadata from Natural Voice Descriptions.

SAN JOSE, California— November 17, 2017— Consumers frustrated by the complexity of scanning and organizing their film based images will have a new option as Silicon Valley-based Qroma LLC announces the availability of QromaScan v3.0 for iOS®. QromaScan captures and organizes photos, slides and negatives in one step using specially designed iPhone® accessories and an innovative voice recognition technology. Version 3 brings a new Natural Language Tagging engine that enables users to describe their photos in their own words and use QromaScan’s cutting edge voice recognition technology to detect and embed photo metadata tags for key details such like the date, location and people. A new Relationship Manager detects the use of common nouns used for describing family members such as ‘mom’ and ‘dad’ and automatically tags the image with their full names.

QromaScan 3 greatly simplifies what was once the tedious process of creating industry standard photo metadata. Powered by machine learning and linguistic parsing, QromaScan 3’s Natural Language Tagging engine can store up to 2,000 characters of the user’s transcribed description of a photo and then automatically generate photo metadata tags for things like dates, places, GPS coordinates, and people names. The transcribed description and detected metadata are embedded into the image where they are recognized and made searchable by any operating system or photo organization software that reads standard EXIF and IPTC metadata, such as Adobe Lightroom CC®, Google Photos or Apple Photos®.

Use a Twitter Bot to Colorize Your Black-And-White Photos in Seconds for Free

Use a Twitter bot to colorize photos? It sounds strange but is true.

If you tweet the Colorise Bot a photograph of a black-and-white photograph, will transform it into a technicolor picture. The best part? It’s super fast, with some images colorized in a matter of seconds. The new tool is the product of two British teenagers, Oli Callaghan and Finnian Anderson. Oli is 18, while Finnian is just 17 years old. The Colorise Bot uses a pre-made neural network that’d been trained on a large dataset of 4.5 million images.

Ah, those teenagers! What will they think of next? When I was 17 years old, I wasn’t thinking about neural networks!

The Truth You’ve Never Heard About Plimoth Colony and the First Thanksgiving

The Thanksgiving story you know probably goes a bit like this: English Pilgrims, seeking religious freedom, landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where they found a rich land full of animals and were greeted by a friendly Indian named Squanto, who taught them how to plant corn.

The true story is more complicated. Once you learn about the real Squanto — also known as Tisquantum — you’ll have a great yarn to tell your family over the Thanksgiving table.

How is it that Squanto knew how to speak perfect English when the Pilgrims arrived?

Announcing a Change on FamilySearch: a New Free Sign-in Process Offers Greater Subscriber Experiences and Benefits

The following announcement was written by the folks at: FamilySearch

Salt Lake City, Utah (16 November 2017), Beginning December 13, 2017, patrons visiting FamilySearch.org will see a prompt to register for a free FamilySearch account or sign in to their existing account to continue enjoying all the free expanded benefits FamilySearch has to offer. Since its launch in 1999, FamilySearch has added millions of users, billions of various historical records, and many fun, new features like Family Tree, Memories, mobile apps, digital books, and dynamic help. In order to accommodate continued growth of these and future free services, FamilySearch must assure all its partners that its content is offered in a safe and secure online environment. Patrons creating a free account and signing in fulfills that need.

Patron sign in will also enable FamilySearch to satisfy the ongoing need for user authentication. This authentication can deliver rich, personalized discovery, collaboration, and help experiences. Simply put, signed-in visitors can access more searchable content and enjoy more personalized services.

A MyHeritage DNA Reunion was Featured Live on Good Morning America

An emotional reunion between a mother and daughter who met for the first time took place today live on Good Morning America, the popular U.S. television program. The reunion happened thanks to MyHeritage DNA.

Angie was a teenage mother who placed her baby Meribeth for adoption in 1986. She never got to hold Meribeth after she gave birth to her, and she always hoped that she was adopted by a loving family. For thirty years, they both wondered about one another. MyHeritage DNA enabled Meribeth and Angie to finally find one another.

Findmypast Announces Plans to Publish Trinity Mirror Archive

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

  • Over 12 million pages from the archives of Trinity Mirror to be digitised and published online for the first time
  • Two-year programme of intensive digitisation will nearly double the newspaper holdings of Findmypast and the British Newspaper Archive

London, 16th November 2017

Leading British family history company Findmypast has announced a ground-breaking two-year programme of intensive digitisation from the archives of Trinity Mirror, the largest private newspaper collection in the UK.

The project will result in the online publication of over 12 million pages, made available online for the very first time at Findmypast, as well as on Findmypast’s sister site, the British Newspaper Archive. This will give family and local historians around the world the opportunity to search and explore a wide variety of historical UK publications that were previously inaccessible to the public.

Nokia Security Report for 2017

Are you concerned about malware (malevolent software), such as viruses, keyloggers, and trojan horse programs? If so, you might want to read a new report from Nokia.

The Nokia Threat Intelligence Report examines malware infections found in mobile and fixed networks worldwide. It provides analysis of data gathered from more than 100 million devices by the Nokia NetGuard Endpoint Security solution. The new report details key security incidents and trends from the first three quarters of 2017. Amongst the findings:

  • Devices using the Android operating system were the most likely to be infected this year, according to Nokia research.
  • Android was the #1 target for Malware, about 1% of all Android devices will be infected, an increase from 2016. This means 0.94% of all Android devices were infected, slightly above Google’s 2016 Q4 estimate of 0.71%.
  • Out of all infected devices, 68.50% were Androids, 27.96% ran on Windows, and 3.54% used iOS.

Announcing a New Website Featuring Genealogy Information from Every American Community

Here is an interesting announcement I received this morning. I have briefly looked at the site but haven’t really been able to determine its usefulness. If you have used the Global Research Library Inc., please post your comments below.

The Global Research Library claims to have genealogical records for every part of America as well as most foreign countries. It has some free information available but most of the records require a paid subscription to access. Subscriptions cost $25 US dollars for individuals with higher fees for libraries, societies, and other institutions. Of course, individuals also may access it for free by visiting a nearby library or society that has paid for a subscription.

The announcement describes the Global Research Library Inc. as:

“—primarily an educational portal, covering virtually all subjects in more than a hundred languages. Our research engine is designed for schools, colleges, and universities, as well as individuals who want to learn more.

The Best Free Online File Converters for All Your Formatting Needs

Have you ever received a file or created one of your own that needed to be in a different format? Whether it’s from PDF to DOC, JPG to BMP, or MP3 to WAV, documents, images, audio and video files can be converted easier than you think.

An article by Sandy Stachowiak in the MakeUseOf web site describes seven different online services that convert all sorts of text, graphics, audio, and eve video files from one format. All of them are cloud-based so there is no software to install in your computer. These seven services all work on Windows, Macintosh, Chromebooks, Linux, iPads, Android tablets, and most any other kind of computer that has a web browser.

Best of all, they are free for personal use.

You can find the article at: http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/free-online-file-converters.

CompuServe’s Forums Are Closing On December 15

Sad news: the CompuServe forums are closing down. Admittedly, they have been declining for years and the end always appeared to be inevitable. Still, it is sad news when it the shutdown is finally announced. Many online genealogists got their start on CompuServe’s Genealogy Forum.

You can read more about the closure of CompuServe’s forums at: http://bit.ly/2zKhN5T.

I feel especially saddened as I was the one who founded the Genealogy Forum on CompuServe in 1988. It was my first entry into online publishing and running a discussion board. While CompuServe canceled my contract years ago and I moved on to other things, I have always had a soft spot in my heart for the Genealogy Forum on CompuServe.

“Memento Mori” Auction to be Held Tomorrow, November 15

This is a follow-up to yesterday’s article on Memento Mori Photography. By coincidence, this morning I received an announcement of an auction for one of America’s largest collections of Memento Mori art. The auction includes pictures as well as paintings, brooches, rings, and other objects that commemorate people who had died. This may be the largest collection of mourning art ever offered for sale.

WARNING: The auction is being held TOMORROW: November 15. I only received notice of it today.

Gold “Stuart crystal” mourning slide, England, late 17th century

The collection comes from the Museum of Mourning Art, owned by the late Anita and Irvin G. Schorsch. Following the deaths of the couple in 2015 and 2014, the Museum was closed and the entire collection is being offered for sale at auction.

Quoting from the auction house’s description:

Purchase a MyHeritage DNA kit for only $59

MyHeritage has a rather attractive offer: Click here to purchase a DNA test kit for $59 US.

There is also a rather attractive advertisement for it as well as shown in this video:

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: October 23 to November 13, 2017

Summary

Over 28 million new historic records were added on FamilySearch from DenmarkEngland, and the Netherlands, as well as millions more from BillionGravesBritish Columbia, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Ecuador, France, GermanyHondurasIllinoisIowaItalyKentuckyMissouriNamibia, New JerseyOhio, PeruPoland, SlovakiaSouth AfricaSweden, United States, and Washington. Search these new free records at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Book Review: Take Control of Your Digital Legacy

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

Take Control of Your Digital Legacy
By Joe Kissell. An ebook, published at TidBITS Publishing, Inc., 2017. 127 pages.

At my age, those disagreeable, irksome end-of-life medical, financial, and genealogy issues raise their ugly heads. I dutifully pay attention to them for awhile, but after a time, I stop dealing about them and go back to working on more of the fun stuff. But I have to say, it never, ever, occurred to me that I needed to consider the legacy of my personal digital life.

You know, Facebook, LinkedIn, My Heritage, Ancestry, it’s quite a list once you make it. My personal computer, my genealogy software, my photo files, my research files, my subscriptions, my email accounts; what was paper in the 20th century is digital in the 21st century. And it still needs to be dealt with, if I want any of it to survive outside a Dell. My decades of photos, research, and genealogy reside in what my kids will see as a hard, gray laptop containing nothing they’re interested in. They will never open it, unless I convince them to care about what’s in it.

Postmortem Photography

It sounds ghoulish but many of our ancestors accepted the idea as normal: photographing the corpses of family members shortly after their death. During the Victorian era, such photographs were meant to be happy reminders of the life of the deceased person for their families. Death, and personally dealing with death, was prevalent throughout the entire world as epidemics would come quickly and kill quickly. Postmortem photographs not only helped in the grieving process, but often represented the only visual remembrance of the deceased and were among a family’s most precious possessions. These were often called “Memento Mori Photography.” Memento mori is Latin for “remember that you have to die.”

 

Mother and deceased child

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Dutch Tulip Mania of 1636-1637

How to Save a Webpage as a PDF File, So You Later Can View It Offline

Your Genealogy Research Could Land Your DNA Results in a Criminal Investigation

NBC to Develop a “Reunited” Genealogy Television Drama

Ancestry and the New England Historic Genealogical Society Collaborate to Make Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston Records Available Online

North Carolina’s Brimley Collection of Photographs is now Available Online

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Online Webinars, Colorado, Florida, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, and New York

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

(+) Dutch Tulip Mania of 1636-1637

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

We often think of speculation in stock market, real estate, oil futures, or dot-com companies to be modern ventures for risk-taking entrepreneurs. Not so. Our ancestors were known to take perhaps even greater risks in a largely unregulated business atmosphere. Perhaps the most famous was the Dutch Tulip Mania of 1636-1637. However, it was not confined to the Dutch; many of our ancestors in other countries also joined in the frenzy. Many of them lost fortunes, large and small.

Pamphlet from the Dutch tulipomania, printed in 1637

When we think of tulips, most of us automatically think of Holland. However, it is not a native plant of that country. The first tulip appeared in the United Provinces (now called the Netherlands) in 1593, when Charles de L’Ecluse (or Carolus Clusius) first bred tulips that could tolerate the harsh conditions of the Low Countries. Charles’ bulbs were sent to him from Turkey by his friend, Ogier de Busbecq.

Over 2 Million New Military Records Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 2 million brand new military records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour

Search over 1.7 million Commonwealth War Graves Commission records to discover the final resting place of your military ancestors. The collection honours the 1.7 million men and women of the Commonwealth forces who died in the First and Second World Wars and covers cemeteries and memorials at 23,000 locations in more than 150 countries.

British Armed Forces, Roman Catholic Registers