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Findmypast Announces Acquisition of RootsFinder, Inc. and the RootsFinder Family Tree Product

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

  • RootsFinder accelerates Findmypast’s development of the Findmypast Tree.
  • Acquisition marks the latest step in Findmypast’s drive to innovate and enhance user discoveries.
  • RootsFinder founder, Dallan Quass, joins the Findmypast team to assist with future integration work and tree development

Leading family history website, Findmypast, has acquired RootsFinder Inc. and their critically acclaimed RootsFinder family tree product, including new features to help customers analyze their DNA results.

The acquisition reflects Findmypast’s drive to innovate and enhance their customer experience by providing users with new ways to curate, share and explore their family history discoveries. 

New Records Available To Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 800,000 new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday.

Yorkshire Baptisms

Over 135,000 new additions covering 81 new parishes have been added to the collection.

Each record contains both a transcript and an image of the original register entry that will reveal a combination of your ancestor’s baptism date, baptism place, denomination and parent’s names.

Yorkshire Banns

Proposed Bill Would Force Many Arizonians to Pay $250 to Have Their DNA Added to a Database

This proposed legislation would be great for future genealogists if they can gain access to the database (which I doubt). However, there are huge security and privacy issues involved.

Arizona Bill 1475 was introduced by Republican State Senator David Livingston and would require teachers, police officers, child day care workers, and many others to submit their DNA samples along with fingerprints to be stored in a database maintained by the Department of Public Safety.

“While the database would be prohibited from storing criminal or medical records alongside the DNA samples, it would require the samples be accompanied by the person’s name, Social Security number, date of birth and last known address,” reports Gizmodo. “The living will be required to pay [a $250 processing fee] for this invasion of their privacy, but any dead body that comes through a county medical examiner’s office would also be fair game to be entered into the database.”

The text of the proposed bill may be found at: https://www.azleg.gov/legtext/54leg/1R/bills/SB1475P.pdf.

New Legislation Seeks To Protect Lost African-American Burial Grounds

From an article by David Anderson in Forbes:

“When new construction projects break ground across the United States, they regularly encounter archaeological materials. Those materials can represent the last surviving trace of the lives lived by the people who made them; and all too often, those materials turn out to be from cemeteries and burial grounds used by segregated and enslaved African American communities. These cemeteries typically went undocumented on local and state government maps and graves were often only marked ephemerally, thus making these spaces all but invisible in the present day.

Zoho Office Suite now uses Artificial Intelligence to Provide a FREE, Powerful Alternative to Office 365

I wrote about the Zoho Office Suite more than two years ago in an article entitled Zoho Workplace: My Favorite FREE Replacement for Microsoft Office. Zoho Workplace is a competitor to Microsoft Office, OpenOffice, LibreOffice, Google Docs, and similar office automation products. It also can read and write documents that were created with Microsoft Office, OpenOffice, LibreOffice, Google Docs, and similar office automation products. (Some minor changes to fonts and formatting may occur when using files created by other programs.) Zoho Workplace works well with a Chromebook, a Windows system, a Macintosh, Linux, or even with an iPad or Android tablet.

Zoho Workplace is still my favorite free word processor, spreadsheet, and presentation suite of programs. I no longer use Microsoft Office. Instead, I prefer Zoho. Now Zoho has made major upgrades to the programs. My earlier article is still available at: https://wp.me/p5Z3-53w.

Quoting an article by Mark Hachman in the PC World web site:

Preserving Documents Digitally Versus on Paper Alone

I frequently hear a genealogist say something like this: “Digital storage methods are dangerous and won’t last long. I am going to save everything on paper so it will last forever.”

I strongly disagree. That is one of the fallacies that seem to float around forever. Professional archivists and data center managers all know better than that.

I certainly do not object to saving information on paper as long as that is only one of the copies made and is in addition to digital copies However, I would never trust paper as the only means of storing information for many years.

Paper is one of the most delicate storage methods available.

New Genealogy Search Engine at Kincrawler.com

Kin Crawler is a web crawler/search engine that works in a similar method as Google but with one major difference: it is constantly crawling the web looking for any pages that pertain solely to genealogy. Once it finds a genealogy-related web site, Kin Crawler indexes each page and puts the words or cache into a database on the Kin Crawler server. The search engine then takes whatever you type in and searches the database for matching words. It then tries to return a list of pages that best match your query.

Kincrawler.com has over 3 million pages in the index so far. These first 2 million crawl has mainly been the free content from the USGenweb, Rootsweb pages, and many other sites that are considered to be good free alternatives to using pay sites. The plan is to expand that “web crawl” to as many genealogy sites as can be identified. If you don’t find what you want on Kin Crawler today, you might return in a few months and try again. By that time, Kin Crawler probably will be expanded significantly.

Reminder: NERGC Early Bird Registration ends February 28

The conferences sponsored by the New England Regional Genealogical Consortium (NERGC) are always great events. Each conference is advertised as:

NERGC is a regional conference with national reach. We bring you affordable, cutting edge, expert genealogical education within the reach of New England genealogists and family historians at an affordable regional price.

Click on the above image to view a larger version.

German-American Connections as Part of an International Genealogical Exchange

The following announcement was written by the Deutsche Arbeitsgemeinschaft genealogischer Verbände (DAGV):

RootsTech 2019 in Salt Lake City is the world´s largest genealogy event. Dirk Weissleder, national chairman of DAGV (Deutsche Arbeitsgemeinschaft genealogischer Verbände, (www.dagv.org) and 2nd Vice President of IGGP (International German Genealogy Partnership, (www.iggpartner.org), will lecture there on genealogical research in Germany and about the “key position” of surnames in any research plan. But Weissleder first made a stop-over in Sacramento to get the latest information about this city as the location for an upcoming International German Genealogy Conference to be held June 15-17, 2019. The conference will be hosted by the Sacramento German Genealogy Society (www.sggs.us), and it will be the largest worldwide gathering on the specific topic of German genealogy this calendar year.

We Are The Roots: Black Settlers and Their Experiences of Discrimination on the Canadian Prairies

The following announcement is from the Genealogy à la carte blog by Gail Dever at http://genealogyalacarte.ca/?p=27135:

Winner of the 2018 Alberta Historical Resources Foundation 2018 Heritage Awareness award, We Are The Roots is a documentary that tells the stories of African American immigrants who settled in Alberta and Saskatchewan in the early 1900s.

Thousands of advertisements were distributed by the Canadian Government via posters, pamphlets, and in American newspapers, encouraging Americans to move to the “Last Best West” where 160 acres of land could be purchased for a registration fee of $10.

Collectionaire Launches at RootsTech 2019

I suspect there will be lots of new product announcements in the next week or more in conjunction with the RootsTech conference. Here is one announcement from Collectionaire. I saw their product at last year’s RootsTech and was impressed. However, the company obviously has been working on the product even more since then, adding more value to the app.

Here is the announcement from Collectionaire:

New web app uses cloud technology to bring a unique approach to organizing, preserving and sharing one’s “best memories”

Unlike other family archiving programs there is no need to move photos – it links users to treasured memories and collections in any cloud site

San Diego, Calif. – Feb. 8, 2019 – Collectionaire today announced the launch of its new cloud-based web app created to help organize, preserve and share a family’s most cherished photos, videos and digital keepsake memories. Unlike other photo organizing solutions, users do not move photos and videos to the Collectionaire site. Instead, the app acts as a hub, linking users to their photo and video collections stored in other cloud sites.

RootsFinder now imports DNA matches from Ancestry.com, 23andMe, My Heritage, and FamilyTreeDNA, with New Analysis Tools

The following announcement was written by the developers of RootsFinder:

Orem, Utah: The free family history website RootsFinder.com announces that in addition to its previous support for importing matches from GEDmatch, users can now import their autosomal DNA matches from Ancestry.com, 23andMe, MyHeritage, and FamilyTreeDNA. Matches from these DNA testing companies can then be “tagged” to the user’s family tree for analysis and further research.

By tagging a match to a known relative, users color code their matches. This makes it easy to interpret their results using RootsFinder’s visual DNA analysis tools, including:

New Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of February 19, 2019

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch added new, free, historical records this week from Colombia, Italy, Switzerland, and the United States: California, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa (almost 5 million new military records), New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Rosters of Revolutionary War Soldiers and Sailors.

Search these new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

The Singing Genealogists of Karnataka

Did you ever consider setting your family tree to music? How about musically reciting the members of the family tree for the past 9 centuries? And then doing that for multiple families?

That is what Helavas (professional genealogists) do in in ten districts of Karnataka, India.

An article by Amoolya Rajappa in TheWire.in web site describes the lives of the Helavaru community, a unique semi-nomadic tribe credited to have maintained documents containing the genealogy of several families in ten districts of Karnataka:

“It is believed that Helavas started practicing from the days of Basavanna, a 12th-century social reformer who rebelled against caste hierarchy and gender discrimination. Ever since they have carried on the practice of visiting households and narrating ancestral bloodlines in a lyrical fashion.”

Ancestry Announces 94 New and Updated Communities For People of African American and Afro-Caribbean Descent

The following is an extract from the Ancestry Blog:

With family history research there is always more to discover, and at Ancestry® we are relentless in our commitment to bring new products, insights and updates to you, our members, to empower your journey.

Overview of all AncestryDNA African American communities from 1925-1950. This image shows the exodus of many African Americans from the South to areas in the North and West. This event is commonly known as the Great Migration.

Initiative Begins to Digitally Preserve Ontario’s Historical Vernon Directories

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch and by Library and Archives Canada:

Salt Lake City, Utah (19 February 2019), The Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) and Library and Archives Canada (LAC) are working with FamilySearch International to digitize the historical Vernon directories for the province of Ontario. The initiative will begin immediately to preserve and make the directories freely searchable online for family historians, researchers, and Canadians.

Vernon directories were published yearly, by city, from the 1890s to 2014, except 2010, when the company’s ownership changed. They cover most of Ontario, including the province’s capital city of Toronto. The name “Vernon directories” is derived from the name of the publisher. The initiative will encompass an estimated 1,875 directories.

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City!

Are you planning on attending the RootsTech conference this year? If so, would you like to join a large group of genealogists for dinner on Saturday evening? If so, you are invited!

RootsTech2019 promises to be the biggest genealogy conference in the world! It will be held on February 27 through March 2 in Salt Lake City. I have written several times about RootsTech2019 (see https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Aeogn.com+rootstech2019&t=h_&ia=web for my previous articles).  Of course, a lot more information is also available at http://www.rootstech.org.

More than 20,000 people are expected to attend this year’s RootsTech conference and I expect that will include many readers of this newsletter. If you are planning to attend, would you like to join me and a bunch of newsletter readers for dinner on Saturday evening after the conference ends? That will be on March 2 at the Radisson Hotel, 215 W S Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. The location literally is just a few steps from the Salt Palace conference center. And yes, if you have attended one of my previous dinners after RootsTech, this year’s dinner is in the same room in the same hotel as the last few years.

You are invited!

You can make a reservation now at http://eogn.com/rootstech2019. You are invited to join us if:

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City!

(+) Why Isn’t It Available Online?

Your DNA Ethnicity Report Probably Will Change Over Time

The Cemetery Symbol of Eternal Love

Will a Chromebook Computer Run Genealogy Programs?

Betty Clay, R.I.P.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Online Webinars, California, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, and New York

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.