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Book Review: Women Patriots in the American Revolution

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

Women Patriots in the American Revolution
By Jack Darrell Crowder. Genealogical Publ. Co. 2018. 102 pages.

The participation of women in the Revolutionary War has been historically ignored. Volumes have been written about the militiamen, the military leaders, the regimental soldiers, and the everyday ordinary men who operated the inns, the boarding houses, and the village businesses that served the patriot cause.

Mr. Crowder has put together a book with biographical sketches of eighty-eight women who defied the British authorities, providing aid to the partisan Americans in one way or another.

One example: Mary Murry:

FamilySearch Celebrates 20 Years Online

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Twenty years ago, global nonprofit FamilySearch launched an innovative new website, a free internet genealogy service. Two decades later, FamilySearch is a leader in the rising tide of popular ancestry-related services online. During that time, FamilySearch has expanded and evolved its free mix of online offerings, holding true to its purpose to provide economical access to the world’s genealogical records and create fun family history discoveries for everyone.

On May 24, 1999, FamilySearch.org took the online genealogy world by storm, offering free access to hundreds of millions of historical records online—a treasure for those seeking to make family history connections. For perspective, online broadcast news, e-trading, and downloadable music services were the rage at the time. Google, ranked 93rd of top websites, was still an up-and-coming service that was attempting to redefine the role of a search engine by indexing the web to make results junk free and more consumer relevant.

23andMe is Updating Ancestry Results Without Telling Users

An article by Dan Robitzski in the Futurism.com web site at https://futurism.com/23andme-updating-ancestry-results states:

“If you took a genetic ancestry test through a company like 23andMe, you may want to go back and give your results a second look.

“That’s because as the company gathers more data and learns more about genetic trends, it may update the results for your specific DNA and change around where it believes your family came from, according to STAT News. While it makes sense that these companies would eventually hone in on more accurate results, the shifting reports can be a rude shock to people who used the app to figure out their personal identity — only to find, like 23andMe user Leonard Kim, that the results later shift without warning.”

This shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone who reads this newsletter. I wrote an article a few weeks ago that describes the same thing with Ancestry.com’s test results: the company’s DNA ethnic origins reports changed as more and more information was added to the company’s findings of ethnic origins. You can find my earlier report at http://bit.ly/2DN6o8y and a follow-up article at http://bit.ly/2HxniKH.

Airbnb Partners With 23andMe to Make It Easier for People to Get In Touch With Their Roots

I am not sure I understand the logic of this. Perhaps Airbnb wants to promote genealogy research trips under the assumption that many of those traveling will stay in Airbnb-advertised guest facilities and also might have their DNA tested by 23andMe.

In any case, Airbnb and DNA-testing company 23andMe announced on Tuesday the two companies have partnered to help people “connect with their ancestry” through a heritage travel program.

An announcement by Jennings Brown on the Gizmodo web site cautions:

MyHeritage Offers Free Access to Military Records for Memorial Day

This week marks Memorial Day in the U.S., a day to honor fallen soldiers who served in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Memorial Day has many traditions, including spending time with family and sharing memories of relatives who served in the military. Do you have relatives who served their country? Have you discovered new information about their military history?

To help you learn more about your heroic ancestors and the sacrifices they made in service of their country, MyHeritage is offering free access to all of the company’s military records in SuperSearch™, over 47 million records. The collections can be searched for FREE from May 22 (that’s NOW) until May 28, 2019. You can read more in the MyHeritage Blog.

Search the military records for free at www.myheritage.com/military-records for fascinating new information about your ancestors and relatives who served in the military. Let us know what you discover.

Geoff Rasmussen of FamilyTreeWebinars.com Announces a Rare 50% off Special on Webinar Memberships

I suspect that Geoff Rasmussen is the most prolific genealogy webinar host of all time. I know I have benefited immensely from listening to a number of his webinars. Now he is offering a one-year webinar membership. It usually costs $49.95 but, for one week, it’s 50% off at only $24.98. That price includes access to the entire webinar library.

With your webinar membership, you’ll get unlimited access to more than 900 classes and all the syllabus materials on:

New Transcription Workflow: African American Civil War Soldiers

The following announcement was written by the African American Civil War Soldiers team:

African American Civil War Soldiers recently launched a new workflow to complete the transcription of the military records of all Black men who fought for the Union army, beginning with the famous 54th and 55th Massachusetts regiments. Read on to see how you can get involved!

Last year Zooniverse volunteers transcribed the records of a sample of 40,000 members of the United States Colored Troops (USCT), the African American soldiers who fought for their freedom in the American Civil War. Due to the enthusiasm and commitment of these volunteers we completed the sample ahead of schedule. Today we are launching a new site to transcribe the records of the rest of the USCT and make them all freely available to scholars, genealogists and members of the public. We have divided the remaining soldiers based on their state of enlistment, and will be launching each new batch of records state-by-state.

Book Review: The People of…series of books by David Dobson

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The People of…series of books by David Dobson.
Genealogical Publishing Co.

The prodigious compiler David Dobson continues to memorialize the Scottish and Irish peoples, and some others.

The People of Strathmore 1600-1799
2017. 212 pages.
The name Strathmore is derived from the Gaelic words An Srath Mor, meaning broad or big valley. Located in eastern Scotland, the region is home to several small towns and farming communities.

This book identifies people living in the burghs of Kirriemuir, Forfar, and Brechin, as well as area parishes lying within the county of Angus. A previous book The People of Lowland Perthshire covers the western part of Strathmore that lies in Perthshire.
The author notes here the Davidson family of Harley-Davidson motorcycle fame, and the Carnegie family, ancestors of Andrew Carnegie.

German Holocaust Archive puts Millions of Documents Online

The International Tracing Service in Germany has uploaded more than 13 million documents from Nazi concentration camps, including prisoner cards and death notices, to help Holocaust researchers and others investigate the fate of victims.

Established by the Western Allies in the final days of World War II and initially run by the Red Cross, the ITS also announced Tuesday it was changing its name to “Arolsen Archives – International Center on Nazi Persecution.”

Luther Byrd Genealogical Collections from Surry Community College are Now Online at DigitalNC

The staff of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center seem to be collecting and digitizing all sorts of materials of interest to genealogists and then placing them online in DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina. According to the DigitalNC web site:

Over 120 genealogical collections from Surry County have been digitized and added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, Surry Community College. Created and assembled by Luther Byrd, former Elon College professor from Westfield, North Carolina, these collections represent a huge variety of information about different families and their descendants living in Surry County. Many of the collections include documents, papers, newspaper clippings, and personal letters to and from Byrd about the family members.

“Also included are various family records and family tree diagrams, complete with indexes to determine where a given family member is located in the tree.”

“Looking through these collections, it is fascinating to see the staggering amount of documents and material that these families created and saved throughout the years, as well as the amount of work that Byrd put in to ensure that these collections are all relevant and well-maintained.”

If you have North Carolina ancestry, you need to spend some time at: http://bit.ly/2Qcvqmx.

GEDmatch Implements Required Opt-In for Law Enforcement Matching

GEDmatch is an open data personal genomics database and genealogy website founded in 2010 by Curtis Rogers and John Olson. Its main purpose is to help “amateur and professional researchers and genealogists,” including adoptees searching for birth parents. However, it recently has also become “the de facto DNA and genealogy database for all of law enforcement,” according to The Atlantic’s Sarah Zhang.

GEDmatch recently gained a lot of publicity after it was used by law enforcement officials to identify a suspect in the Golden State Killer case in California. Other law enforcement agencies started using GEDmatch for violent crimes, making it one of the most powerful tools available for identifying “cold case” criminals.

Sadly, the same site also has generated a lot of controversy involving the lack of privacy of personal DNA information, both for the people who uploaded their own DNA data and especially for the relatives of the uploaders whose DNA information also was included without their permission and usually without their knowledge. Such blatant disregard for personal privacy may be a violation of privacy laws in many countries.

The GEDmatch owners have now tightened the web site’s rules on privacy. The result is expected to make it much more difficult for law enforcement agencies to find suspects.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Downsizing: the Paperless Office for Genealogists

Book Review: Abstracts of the Debt Books of the Provincial Land Office of Maryland

Announcing the MyHeritage DNA Health and Ancestry Test

A Village in France Will Pay You $2,240 to Decipher a Rock

Preserving Pennsylvania’s Oldest Historical Documents

Update: a Genealogy Cruise to Bermuda and to Newport, Rhode Island in 2020 with Cruise Everything

Cool Location Explorer on Google Maps – a Tool for GeoGeeks

Findmypast offers New Opportunities to Discover and Find Connections in Europe

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

New Free Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of May 13, 2019

TheGenealogist is Expanding its Occupational Records with over 300,000 Records of Masters and Apprentices included in a Nautical Set of Apprenticeship Records

W.S. Clark Store of Tarboro, North Carolina Accounting Ledgers are Now Online at DigitalNC

A Success in Fighting Diabetes

Update: A Success in Fighting Diabetes

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

NOTE: If you are a Plus Edition subscriber and yet you did not receive the email notice in your in-box, take a look in your spam folder. It probably is there. Most email programs have (optional) filters that you can specify to make sure future Plus Edition notices get sent correctly to your in-box. For instance, GMail users can find instructions at https://blog.eogn.com/2014/09/07/how-to-make-gmail-always-place-this-newsletter-in-the-in-box-not-in-the-spam-folder/. Most other email programs have similar capabilities.

To all non-subscribers:

If you would like to read this week’s Plus Edition newsletter, you can sign up for a subscription by looking at the menus to the right and clicking on “Subscribe to or Renew the Plus Edition Newsletter.” Once you subscribe, you will be given immediate access to the Plus Edition web site and will be able to read the latest Plus Edition newsletter, along with the two previous weekly Plus Edition editions.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Dick Eastman at https://blog.eogn.com/contact-dick-eastman.

(+) Downsizing: the Paperless Office for Genealogists

WARNING: This article contains personal opinions.

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman.

Paper. I have been drowning in it for years.

Genealogists soon learn to collect every scrap of information possible. We collect copies of birth certificates, marriage records, death certificates, census entries, military pension applications, deeds, and much, much more. I don’t know about you, but I have been collecting these bits of information as paper, mostly photocopies, for years. Over the past thirty+ years, I have probably spent thousands of dollars in photocopying fees!

I now have a four-drawer filing cabinet behind me as I write these words and another four-drawer filing cabinet in the basement. I have book shelves that are groaning under the weight of (printed) books. Since I don’t have enough room for all my books, many of them are stored in boxes in the basement, and I seem to never retrieve any of those books from storage. They lie there, year after year, gathering dust and mildew, providing information to no one.

Searching for information in hundreds of books stored in the basement is so time consuming and so impractical that it never gets done.

In addition to the thousands of dollars spent on photocopying fees, I have spent still more on filing cabinets, manila file folders, bookshelves, and more. Then there’s the books. I hate to think what I have spent for books! Postage charges alone have been more than I care to think about.

Announcing the MyHeritage DNA Health  and Ancestry Test

The following announcement was written by MyHeritage. You can also read more details and look at a number of additional images in the MyHeritage Blog at https://blog.myheritage.com/2019/05/introducing-the-myheritage-dna-health-ancestry-test/.

MyHeritage Expands to Health; Launches New DNA Test Offering Powerful and Personalized Health Insights for Consumers

The new MyHeritage DNA Health+Ancestry test provides comprehensive health reports for conditions affected by genetics including heart disease, breast cancer, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease

TEL AVIV, Israel & LEHI, Utah—MyHeritage, the leading global service for family history and DNA testing, announced today a major expansion of its DNA product line with the launch of the MyHeritage DNA Health+Ancestry test. The test provides a new dimension of genetic insight with comprehensive health reports that can empower future health and lifestyle choices. It is a superset of the current MyHeritage DNA Ancestry-Only test, and includes its pillar features: a percentage breakdown of ethnic origins and matching to relatives through shared DNA. MyHeritage is now the only global consumer DNA company to offer an extensive health and ancestry product in over 40 languages.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Online Webinars, Australia, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are more than 9.5 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday.

United States Directories & Almanacs

Over 151,000 new records have been added to the collection. The new additions consist of city directories covering Ohio as well as directories covering the Washington, District of Columbia. The directories in this collection stretch across the 1700s to the 1900s and will enable you to discover your ancestor’s address and occupation or explore the history of your home address. These directories are also a good substitute for the 1890 Census for the United States that was lost to fire.

Almanacs and directories are an excellent resource for anyone researching their family history and want to understand more about their ancestor’s life. They provide insights into when the courts would sit and the presiding judge, as well as full listings of notable individuals such as President John Adams residing at 190 High Street in the 1798 Directory for Pennsylvania, business owners, trades people, civil servants, church leaders, school teachers and much more. Furthermore, you can explore the history of your home by searching the publications by address, where you may discover previous proprietors.

Scotland, Shetland Newspaper Birth Index 1872-1990

TheGenealogist is Expanding its Occupational Records with over 300,000 Records of Masters and Apprentices included in a Nautical Set of Apprenticeship Records

The following announcement was written by TheGenealogist:

These BT 150 records from The National Archives comprise of an index that had been compiled by the Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen and its predecessor. It consists of apprentices indentured in the Merchant Navy between 1824-1910.

Family historians can use these records to:

  • Find ancestors who had learned the trade of a professional merchant seaman
  • Discover the age of an ancestor at the time that he went to sea and his year of birth
  • Find the name of the company and the port that he was registered as an apprentice
  • In some cases also learn the name of the ship that your ancestor sailed on

Findmypast offers New Opportunities to Discover and Find Connections in Europe

The following is an announcement written by Findmypast:

  • 20 European nations now available to search at Findmypast
  • Over 114 million new birth, marriage and death records will automatically generate hints on your Findmypast family tree
  • Huge release mark’s latest step in Findmypast’s massive global expansion to connect the world

In celebration of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019, leading Family History website, Findmypast, have added over 114 million European births, baptisms, marriages, banns, deaths and burials to their growing collection of International records.

The new additions consist of transcripts of original civil and church documents sourced from the International Genealogical Index, a database compiled from a variety of sources from around the world. They span nearly five centuries (1502 to 1960) of European history and cover 20 nations across the continent, including:

Preserving Pennsylvania’s Oldest Historical Documents

“History may not repeat itself, but the present often rhymes with the past.” And in order to understand the past, preserving old documents and records is key.

“Cumberland County archivists recently received a grant to preserve documents that are older than the United States. These records include pieces from signers of the Declaration of Independence, among other works of historical significance that give a glimpse of Pennsylvania’s past.”

You can read more and listen to a podcast in an article by Kate Sweigart in the WITF.ORG web site at: http://www.witf.org.

Book Review: Abstracts of the Debt Books of the Provincial Land Office of Maryland

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

Abstracts of the Debt Books of the Provincial Land Office of Maryland
By V.L.Skinner, Jr. Published by Genealogical Publishing Co. 2017.

Vernon L. Skinner, Jr. has put together a set of books representing a remarkable amount of work, for our reference.

The Maryland Provincial Land Office dispensed land from 1634 to 1777. The Rent Rolls and Debt Books record the annual rents due to the Lord Proprietor from the person to whom the tract was granted.

The original Debt Books are arranged by county, then by year, then by name of the person paying the rent. Each liber contains information for only one county, but for multiple years.