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Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. The latest Plus Edition newsletter is available at: https://eognplus.com/news/thisweek.htm.

The following articles are listed in this week’s Plus Edition email:

This Newsletter is 24 Years Old!

Oh No! My Hard Drive Crashed.

Men Plead Guilty in Pittsburgh Carnegie Library Rare Books Theft

British National Archives to trial 12-Document Limit Per Day for Visitors, as Academics Warn Research Could Be Affected

No One Knew why the Kids in 2 Amish Families were Dying Suddenly. Now Researchers Have Some Answers. (It is Their Ancestry!)

BBC Radio Times: Another Source of Genealogy Data

Newsletter reader Mike Mallett shared some information that can be valuable to genealogists searching for information about ancestors in the U.K. Mike writes:

“The BBC Radio Times archives from 1923 to 2009 are now freely available online at https://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/issues. This UK magazine was started as the BBC’s radio listing but later include TV programmes. Although strictly not a genealogy resource, it is a good way to check people and events of the time. You might want to see how the world was on your birthday.

“As aside we also have the TV Times which is the listing for ITV and some of the commercial channels.”

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

United Kingdom, Ireland, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Ohio

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

Oh No! My Hard Drive Crashed.

If you have been reading this newsletter for a while, you probably know that I often publish articles advising people to make frequent backups of all important data in their computers. Yesterday, I had an “opportunity” to try my own advice.

Yesterday morning, I turned on my trusty iMac to check email messages, check the EOGN web sites, and then to create the weekly Plus Edition email message that I send to all Plus Edition subscribers. There was one problem: Once powered on, the boot process started as normal and then, about a minute later, displayed an on-screen message saying that it was unable to find the iMac’s hard drive.

Oh no!

To make a long story short, after troubleshooting for a while, it seems the iMac’s internal 2-terabyte hard drive was dead. Kaput.

British National Archives to trial 12-Document Limit Per Day for Visitors, as Academics Warn Research Could Be Affected

An article in the History News Network warns that a new trial that will restrict readers to 12 documents a day has generated concerns it may add “huge expense” to research of historians, genealogists, and anyone else who makes extensive use of the documents in the British National Archives in Kew, west London.

The National Archives claimed the move was designed to increase efficiency – but faced an immediate backlash from historians who complained their work could become untenable.

You can read more in an article in the History News Network at https://hnn.us/article/173995.

North Carolina Newspapers from Northampton County are now Online

From the Digital North Carolina Blog, part of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center highlights from the collections at DigitalNC, an online library of primary sources from institutions across North Carolina:

One of our goals is to increase representation of counties and communities that are under-represented on DigitalNC. Most recently we’ve been focusing on around 10 counties; one of these is Northampton County. Today we’re happy to have added newspapers from that county, thanks to an inquiry from the Northampton County Museum.

We’ve added two titles, the Roanoke Patron (9 issues from 1883-1891) and the Roanoke-Chowan Times (1,237 issues from 1892-1926). The latter actually encompasses a few predecessor titles, including The Gleaner and The Patron and Gleaner.

TheGenealogist Releases Records for over 500,000 individuals from Norfolk Parish Records

TheGenealogist has just released records for over 500,000 individuals from Norfolk Parish Records in the UK with images of the original records in association with the Norfolk Record Office. The following is the announcement:

TheGenealogist has just added over 500,000 individuals in a new release of Parish Records for the English county of Norfolk with images of the original records in association with the Norfolk Record Office. TheGenealogist has transcribed them so that they are fully searchable by name and place.

Caister Church, Norfolk

These East Anglian records feature the registers of baptisms, marriages and burials covering various parishes in Norfolk, allowing family history researchers from all over the world to search for their Norfolk ancestors online.

New UK Parish and Military records available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

British Army Service Records

Over 2,000 new Scots Guards service records have just been added to our collection of British Army Service records. These include records of Scots Guards officers, available exclusively on Findmypast and never before published, who enlisted with this prestigious regiment of foot guards between 1642 and 1939.

The Scots Guards can trace its origin back to 1642 when they were known as the Marquis of Argyll’s Royal Regiment. Throughout its history, the regiment has also be known as the Scots Regiment of Foot Guards, 3rd Regiment of Foot Guards, and the Scots Fusilier Guards. Finally, in 1877, the regiment received its title as Scots Guards. The enlistment records include the names of men who served in the Seven Years War, the Napoleonic War, the Crimean War, and the two world wars.

Kent Baptisms

Could a Chromebook Replace Your Now-Outdated Laptop?

This is a follow-up to my earlier off-topic article, How to Switch from Windows 7 to Chrome OS CloudReady. That article is available at http://bit.ly/30ssvLz. However, the newer article was written by Ben Schoon and published in the 9to5Google web site at: http://bit.ly/2Rhl05S.

“It’s official. This week, support ends for Windows 7 as Microsoft pushes users to upgrade to Windows 10. While a Windows 7 laptop isn’t just going to die, a lack of future updates leaves it open to attacks. So, is a Chromebook a viable replacement for your Windows 7 machine? Let’s discuss.

“Why should I stop using Windows 7?

No One Knew why the Kids in 2 Amish Families were Dying Suddenly. Now Researchers Have Some Answers. (It is Their Ancestry!)

An article by Harmeet Kaur in the CNN web site tells a sad story that shows why DNA research can be so important. The article tells about a new study published in JAMA Cardiology (at https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/article-abstract/2758306) that sheds light on what caused a number of Amish children to die suddenly. Sadly, the cause turned out to be a genetic problem passed down amongst many families in the Amish community.

Quoting from the report in JAMA Cardiology:

“Findings In this molecular autopsy and genetic analysis, a novel homozygous multiexon duplication in RYR2 was identified among young Amish individuals with exertion-related sudden deaths and sudden cardiac arrests without an overt phenotype to suggest RYR2-mediated catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia.

This Newsletter is 24 Years Old!

It’s time to raise a glass of bubbly and celebrate! Yes, I am celebrating this newsletter’s twenty-fourth anniversary.

Wow! I have been publishing this newsletter for nearly a quarter century. Where did the time go? It seems like only yesterday that I decided to start writing a genealogy newsletter for a few of my friends and acquaintances. Well, it wasn’t yesterday… it was 24 years ago today!

Never in my wildest dreams did I ever dream that 24 years would be so interesting, so much fun, and so rewarding. The very first edition of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter was sent on January 15, 1996.

Twenty-four years has slipped by in almost the blink of an eye. It seems like only yesterday that I sent the first e-mail newsletter to about 100 people, mostly members of CompuServe’s Genealogy Forums. (Do you remember CompuServe?) The last time I looked, this newsletter now has tens of thousands of readers tuning in every day! If you would have told me that 24 years ago, I would have never believed you.

This little newsletter started as a way for me to help my friends to learn about new developments in genealogy, to learn about conferences and seminars, and to learn about new technologies that were useful to genealogists. I especially focused on what was then the newly-invented thing called the World Wide Web. In 1996, many people had never heard of the World Wide Web and most people didn’t understand it.

Mayflower Essay Contest Challenges Massachusetts Students, Grades 5-12

The following announcement was written by American Ancestors, also known as New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS):

A Massachusetts Statewide Student Essay Competition Will Commemorate the 400th Anniversary of the Landing of the Mayflower

American Ancestors|New England Historic Genealogical Society Challenges Massachusetts Students to Reflect Upon the Relevance of the Voyage of the Mayflower 400 Years after Its Arrival

January 14, 2020—Boston, Massachusetts—400 years ago the Mayflower landed on the shores of what would later be known as Massachusetts, forever changing the course of history of four nations: America, England, the Netherlands, and the Wampanoag. American Ancestors—also known as New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS)—a national family history organization headquartered in Boston and one of the groups leading activities to commemorate the quadricentennial of the landing of the Mayflower, has announced a statewide student competition in Massachusetts to honor the story of the Pilgrims and of the native Wampanoag people. The 2020 American Ancestors Young Historians Essay Contest asks students to explore how this 400-year old history relates to our national, familial, and/or personal stories and identities.

Open to students currently enrolled in grades 5–12 in public, private, and parochial schools, and those in home-study programs across the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the contest asks participants to address one of three topics:

FGS & the National Park Service to Launch U.S.-Mexican War War Soldiers & Sailors Database

The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:

FEDERATION OF GENEALOGICAL SOCIETIES AND NATIONAL PARK SERVICE ANNOUNCE LAUNCH OF U.S.-MEXICAN WAR SOLDIER & SAILOR DATABASE

January 14, 2020 – Austin, TXand Brownsville, TX.

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and the National Park Service’s Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park (NPS) announce the launch of the U.S.-Mexican War Soldier & Sailor database.

This online, searchable database contains information for over 85,000 U.S. and Mexican veterans who served in this war. Many records include personal details, such as hair color and occupation.

The database allows descendants of these soldiers and sailors to connect to their personal history and helps Palo Alto commemorate and tell the stories of those who served. This invaluable research tool benefits genealogists, historians, as well as people who may have never known they are related to a U.S.-Mexican War veteran.

How to Switch from Windows 7 to Chrome OS CloudReady

NOTE: The following article is off-topic. That is, it has nothing to do with family history, DNA, or any other genealogy-related topic. If you are looking for genealogy articles, you might want to skip this one.

Instead, this article is about some of my favorite topics: the latest software and hardware along with saving money and the use of computer hardware and software. If you are interested in these topics, you may find this article to be of some interest.

However, if you are already using Windows 10 or a Macintosh or a Chromebook or Linux, you probably will not  find anything of interest in the following article.

According to many articles on the Web, including one written by Danny Palmer and published in the ZDNet web site:

Windows 7 has reached end of life and now isn’t supported by Microsoft. It means businesses and consumers with PCs running on Windows 7 – which was introduced in 2009 – will no longer receive technical assistance, software patches and security updates from Microsoft, unless they want to pay extra.”

Later in the same article, Palmer writes:

“Such is the potential risk posed by this that the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre – the cyber arm of the GCHQ intelligence service – has issued a warning over the continued use of Windows 7 PCs and laptops, telling users they shouldn’t use Windows 7 devices when accessing personal data.”

You can find dozens of other articles about the Windows 7 end-of-life problem by starting at: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=%22windows+7%22+%22end+of+life.

What should the Windows 7 users do to protect themselves from viruses, identity theft, credit card theft, and similar problems? Actually, there are several very good answers.

Men Plead Guilty in Pittsburgh Carnegie Library Rare Books Theft

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

From an article by Paula Reed Ward in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

“The two men accused of taking more than $8 million worth of rare books and parts of books from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and then selling them to collectors pleaded guilty Monday to theft.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. The latest Plus Edition newsletter is available at: https://eognplus.com/news/thisweek.htm.

The following articles are listed in this week’s Plus Edition email:

(+) The PC and the Macintosh are Dying

RootsWeb Mailing Lists to be Discontinued

Groups.io: The Do-It-Yourself Replacement for Disappearing Message Boards and Mailing Lists

What Does a Polygenic Risk Score Mean?

Gramps 5.1.2 Released

How You can Help the City of Seattle Document and Decode History

What to Expect from FamilySearch in 2020

(+) The PC and the Macintosh are Dying

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Most of today’s genealogists use some sort of computer program to keep track of the information found during their searches. Popular programs include RootsMagic, Legacy Family Tree, Family Tree Builder, Reunion, Family Historian, AncestralQuest, Family Tree Maker, Heredis, Mac Family Tree, and quite a few others. They all have one thing in common: they are all becoming obsolete.

To be sure, obsolescence won’t happen overnight. Even so, if you use any of these Windows or Macintosh programs, you might start thinking about your future plans for these programs.

NOTE #1: Windows computers are usually referred to as “personal computers,” or PCs. In fact, Macintosh computers are also personal computers and are also qualify for the term “personal computers” or PCs. In this article, I will use the term “PC” to refer equally to both Windows and Macintosh desktop and laptop systems.

The PC industry is now losing money. After about three decades of spectacular growth, sales of PCs are now decreasing every year. Market research outfit IDC recently updated their estimates, and they now project a drop of nearly 5 percent in PC sales this year. The company earlier had a forecast of a 3.3 percent decline. PC manufacturers, including Dell, Lenovo, Apple, Hewlett-Packard, Asus, Acer, and others are all reporting decreasing sales.

The numbers reflect the number of PCs sold. However, when examining profits, the numbers are even worse. Not only is the number of PCs being sold decreasing, but the total profits are dropping even faster. Today’s PCs are cheaper than ever, resulting in less and less profit per computer sold. The combination of fewer computers being sold plus lower profit per computer is “double trouble” and is worrying the executives of almost every computer manufacturer.

Gramps 5.1.2 Released

Gramps (an abbreviation for Genealogical Research and Analysis Management Programming System) is a very popular, powerful, and FREE genealogy program that was first developed for Linux and UNIX systems. It has since been ported to Windows and Macintosh systems.

As stated on the Gramps web site:

“Gramps is a free software project and community. We strive to produce a genealogy program that is both intuitive for hobbyists and feature-complete for professional genealogists. It is a community project, created, developed and governed by genealogists.”

Now Gramps 5.1.2 has been released.

You can learn a lot about Gramps at https://gramps-project.org/, https://gramps-project.org/blog/features/, and at https://gramps-project.org/blog/.

The new version 5.1.2 changes are listed at: https://gramps-project.org/blog/2020/01/gramps-5-1-2-released/.

It is strongly recommended that present Gramps users make a backup before upgrading to the new version. Instructions may be found at: https://www.gramps-project.org/wiki/index.php?title=How_to_make_a_backup.

A Secretive Surveillance Company Is Selling Cops Cameras Hidden in Gravestones

A tombstone may be spying on you!

As strange as it may sound, a surveillance vendor that works with U.S. government agencies, such as the FBI, DEA, and ICE, is marketing spying capabilities to local police departments, including cameras that are hidden inside a tombstone, a baby car seat, and a vacuum cleaner.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Texas, Virginia, and Washington

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.