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On the Road Again

By the time you read these words, I should be either en route to or have arrived in Massachusetts. I will be attending the New England Regional Genealogical Consortium’s conference in Springfield, Massachusetts.

The event is sponsored by a long, long  list of participating genealogy societies. You can see the list at: http://www.nergc.org. Past NERGC conferences have attracted 800 or more attendees. I suspect this year’s event will be at least as popular.

Book Reviews: Three More Resources for Georgia Researchers

The following book reviews were written by Bobbi King:

Families of Southeastern Georgia
By Jack N. Averitt. Genealogical Publishing Co. 2009. 457 pages.
Originally published as Volume III of Georgia’s Coastal Plain: Family and Personal History (New York, 1964). The numerous illustrations in the original book are not reproduced in this reprint.

This is a book of strictly biographical sketches; no historical background text, timelines, nor Georgia history.

There are approximately 1,000 biographical descriptions of families offering names, places and dates of birth, spouses, marriage places and dates, children, parents, and places and dates of deaths. Additional personal information commonly includes careers, civic affiliations, church affiliations, and military service, some back to the Civil War.

The index contains approximately 3500 names.

Volumes I and II of the series contain historical information, while Volume III contains the family summaries, hence the reprint of only Volume III. A complete list of the families named can be found at Genealogical.com, Search: Families of Southeastern Georgia.


1864 Census for Re-organizing the Georgia Militia
by Nancy J. Cornell. Genealogical Publishing Co. 2000. 843 pages.

Incomplete Birth Certificates Create a Bureaucratic Morass in Many Places

I had to smile a bit today when reading an article in the Boston Globe about the “problem” of incomplete birth records. It seems the city of Boston has many birth records from years ago where the baby’s name is simply recorded as “baby girl” or “baby boy.” The reporter wrote, “A generation ago — when more families had six or more children — babies without official first names were surprisingly common. Overwhelmed new parents would leave the hospital without completing birth certificate paperwork.”

You can read more in the article by Andrew Ryan in the Boston Globe at: http://bit.ly/2pedZ7w. The same article tells how to amend a record and add a first name by providing documentation.

Actually, the “problem” is not unique to Boston nor to any particular area of the United States. An experienced genealogist probably can tell you of numerous similar examples. I have seen it many times, especially in the case of my mother and her siblings.

To Celebrate DNA Day, MyHeritage is Offering a Discount on Every DNA Test Kit Ordered

Today, April 25, is DNA Day. To celebrate, MyHeritage is offering the readers of this newsletter a discount on every MyHeritage DNA purchase between now and Sunday, April 30th. If you have been thinking of testing your DNA, or the DNA of one of your relatives, now might be a good time to do so.

The offer is free shipping on every MyHeritage DNA purchase. With this promotion, worth $12, and the introductory price of $79, you can obtain the best deal possible.

Again, this special offer will be valid until Sunday, April 30th, and in order to take advantage of it, you will need to enter the following coupon code in the DNA checkout page (after clicking on “Get a coupon code?”):

eogn_dnaday

DNA Day: 11 Things You Might Not Know About DNA

Today, April 25, marks National DNA Day, a day commemorating the enormous achievement of University of Cambridge scientists James Watson and Francis Crick in discovering the structure of DNA for which they were later awarded a Nobel Prize. DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is a giant molecule containing the coded instructions of life. Watson and Crick were the first to discover the double helix structure of DNA, changing the face of biology forever.

In honor of DNA Day, the MyHeritage Blog has a list of 11 things about DNA that you may not have known before. One that caught my eye is, “Over 99% of our DNA sequence is the same as other humans.” We all are more alike than what I realized.

You can read this and the other 10 facts on the MyHeritage Blog at: https://blog.myheritage.com/2017/04/dna-day-11-things-you-might-not-know-about-dna.

Announcing the Release of Legacy Family Tree Version 9

Legacy Family Tree has long been one of the most popular genealogy programs for Windows Now the company has announced a major new upgrade.

Version 9 adds Hinting, FindAGrave.com tools, Stories, Hashtags, DNA Charts and more. Best of all, the company is offering a discounted price for anyone upgrading from an earlier version.

You can read all the details and even watch an online video describing Legacy 9 at: http://bit.ly/2pf4rv0.

IDG Introduces their Newest of In-Brief Research Guide: “Pennsylvania Genealogy” by Elissa Scalise Powell

The following announcement was written by the In-Depth Genealogist:

The In-Depth Genealogist (IDG) is pleased to present their newest in-brief research guide in the research series by writer, Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, entitled “An In-Brief Guide to Pennsylvania Genealogy.” Elissa is a western Pennsylvania researcher and co-director of the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). She is a past-president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and coordinator of the IGHR “Professional Genealogy” course since 2007 She was an instructor for Boston University’s Genealogical Research Certificate course (2008-2016) and co-coordinator of SLIG’s 2013 “Credentialing: AG, CG, or Both?” course. Elissa’s familiarity with Pennsylvania history and research helps make this research guide a real value to anyone wanting to go further with their Pennsylvania ancestors.

Pennsylvania State Archives Training in June

The following announcement was written by the Pennsylvania State Archives:

The Pennsylvania State Archives (PSA), in partnership with Old Economy Village and the Lycoming County Historical Society, is pleased to announce the Spring 2017 Archives Without Tears workshop schedule. The workshops will be held June 6–7 at Old Economy Village, Ambridge, PA and June 15–16 at the Thomas T. Taber Museum of the Lycoming County Historical Society, Williamsport, PA. These are the only sessions planned for 2017. Registration information is attached.

Another Amusing Obituary: Christine Kockinis

The obituary for Christine Kockinis displays a great sense of humor. Here is one excerpt: “Christine requested that six players from the Sacramento Kings be her pallbearers so that they could let her down one last time.”

You can read the entire obituary in The Sacramento Bee at: http://bit.ly/2p7kKrV.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Essential Things I Never Travel Without – Part #1

(+) Will a New Network Replace Our Present World Wide Web?

Book Reviews of Three Books by Michael A. Ports Concerning Georgia History and Genealogy

Question: What Race Am I?

Genealogy Applications for Chromebooks

DNA Day Sales 2017

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Online Webinars, Prince Edward Island, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Mississippi, and Tennessee

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

(+) Essential Things I Never Travel Without – Part #1

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

I travel a lot. It is only April, and I have already been overseas twice this year. In a 12-month period I am visiting Iceland, Denmark, England, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, and China, two trips to Salt Lake City, multiple trips to Massachusetts, and one trip each to Ohio and Pennsylvania, as well as several Caribbean islands. I may add some more trips to the schedule before the year is over.

Some of these trips are for business, but quite a few are for personal reasons. Several trips are to attend genealogy conferences. I also get to spend a bit of time researching my own family tree occasionally. Whenever possible, I try to combine business trips with a few days of vacation, especially when I have an opportunity to go to places I have never visited before. That includes most of my trips overseas.

I have become a fanatic on lightweight packing.

Book Reviews of Three Books by Michael A. Ports Concerning Georgia History and Genealogy

The following book reviews were written by Bobbi King:

Georgia Free Persons of Color
Volume V, Richmond County 1799-1863

by Michael A. Ports
Genealogical Publishing Co. 2016. 166 pages.

Beginning in 1818, Georgia law required free persons of color to register with the inferior courts of their counties of residence. This book holds transcriptions of Richmond County, from four registers, from original records available at the Georgia Department of Archives and History in Morrow, Georgia.

Each register was different in format and information provided; introductory paragraphs explain the contents and format of each. All names are transcribed as accurately as possible as recorded, with no corrections for misspellings. The entries are arranged in a table format, with typical columns of name, age, nativity, place of residence, how long in Georgia, and occupation. Later years’ records note the names of guardians.

Liv Tyler on the U.S. Version of Who Do You Think You Are? Season Finale, Monday on TLC

On Monday’s season finale of Who Do You Think You Are? (airing Monday, April 24 at 8/7c on TLC), actress Liv Tyler unravels the mystery of her father Steven Tyler’s maternal family line, uncovering ancestors who took part in famous American battles. She also learns shocking truths that change the way she will see herself and her family, forever.

You can catch a sneak peek of the episode here:
https://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are/videos/first-look-at-liv-tylers-journey

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Over 128,000 brand new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, Including;

Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law 1916-1921

Over 76,000 additional records have been added to the Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law 1916-1921 collection. These once classified records, digitised from original documents held by The National Archives in Kew, record the struggles of life under martial law in Ireland and contain the details of soldiers and civilians who participated in or were affected by the Easter Rising of April 1916.

DNA Day Sales 2017

April 25 is National DNA Day, according to the National Human Genome Research Institute at https://www.genome.gov/10506367/national-dna-day/. Several of the DNA testing companies hold sales on or around the date in order to promote DNA testing and to drum up some business for their services.

Professional Genetic Genealogist, CeCe Moore, has put together a list of DNA testing sales being offered for this year’s event. The testing companies offering sales include MyHeritage, Family Tree DNA, LivingDNA, and AncestryDNA.

You can view the list and click on links to the various sale pages in CeCe Moore’s web site at: http://www.yourgeneticgenealogist.com/2017/04/dna-day-sales-2017.html.

The Good Cemeterian

Andrew Lumish spends his free time in an unlikely place: cemeteries. On his weekly day off, he spends about ten hours using his cleaning skills to restore veterans’ tombstones around Tampa, Florida. To honor veterans for serving their country, Lumish taught himself how to properly clean graves. He found out the system the government uses for national cemeteries—including Arlington—and got to work.

Lumish tries to post four new pictures a week on his Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/TheGoodCemeterian/.

Question: What Race Am I?

Prince EA, the “spoken word” artist, has recorded an interesting and thought-provoking video, that illustrates one question millions of people have: what race do I claim when filling out forms? He’s downplaying race by explaining that we are all mixed like him and what matters is that we are all human.

Prince EA uses MyHeritage DNA as the basis for his video. (Note: MyHeritage is also the sponsor of this newsletter.)

The video was published earlier today on Facebook by Prince EA at: http://bit.ly/2oV4qKy.

We’re all part of the same family tree of humanity.

A Proposal to Make the 209-year-old Golspie Inn Hotel in Scotland a Culture and Heritage Centre

The owner of the historic Golspie Inn Hotel would like to add a Culture and Heritage Centre to the hotel. He writes:

“Our main focus is to make the Golspie Inn a conductive meeting place where people from the world wide Highland diaspora and, indeed, all those interested can stay, meet and mingle in the ‘homeland’, socialise, research their culture, heritage and ancestry and, of course, sample the goodies and have fun whilst doing so! Another one of the Centre’s unique features will be the chronicling of the diaspora stories and the celebration of the immigrants’ incredible contributions in the new world but that it will be taking place in their own original homeland.”

I guess this is a “solicitation” for funds but it strikes me as a very worthwhile cause:

Genealogy Applications for Chromebooks

The subject came up today in another web site but I think it bears repeating here. I must admit that I love my low-cost Chromebook computer. (Chromebooks typically cost about $150 to $300 although there are a few high-end Chromebooks that cost more.) I am using my Chromebook more and more every day, including right now as I write this article.

The question was asked, “What genealogy programs are available for Chromebooks?”

I have looked at the list before but that was some time ago. Today I went back and looked at the same list again and was surprised that it has grown so much. There are a LOT of genealogy programs available for Chromebooks. Some of them are really Android programs that now run on many of the newer Chromebooks. See https://play.google.com/store/search?q=genealogy&c=apps for the list. Most of them are available free of charge although there are a couple of exceptions.