This Newsletter is Sponsored by MyHeritage

MyHeritage

Kaspersky Now Offers a Free Antivirus Program for Your Windows PC

Kaspersky is a Russian security vendor that offers several well-known and well-respected anti-virus and anti-malware (“malevolent software) products. Now the company is launching a free version of its award-winning antivirus software worldwide. Kaspersky Free offers the most basic protection for free for everyone who wants it. And all without bombarding you with ads.

Kaspersky Free is now available in selected countries. In the words of Eugene Kaspersky himself, it offers “the bare essentials: file, email and web antivirus; automatic updates, self-defense; quarantine; and so on.” These are essentially “the indispensable basics that no one [Windows user] on the planet should do without.”

The free product will occasionally suggest you might want to upgrade to one of Kaspersky’s paid offerings that include extra protection, such as parental control, online payment protection, and a VPN (Virtual Private Network). However, the company also promises that such suggestions will not be obnoxious or frequent.

The Unusual Cause of Death of Allan Pinkerton

Allan J. Pinkerton (25 August 1819 – 1 July 1884) was a Scottish American detective and spy, best known for creating the Pinkerton National Detective Agency. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, Pinkerton emigrated as a young man to seek his fortune in the United States of America. A self-educated man, he had little formal training in any of the professions usually available to immigrants. However, that never slowed the ambitious young man.

He settled in Dundee Township, Illinois, fifty miles northwest of Chicago. He built a cabin and started a cooperage (making barrels). His home soon became a stop on the Underground Railroad, smuggling escaping slaves northward to Canada.

Pinkerton worked with the local sheriff to identify some counterfeiters who were working nearby. Soon he was appointed as the first police detective in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. In 1850 he partnered with Chicago attorney Edward Rucker in forming the North-Western Police Agency, one of the nation’s first private detective services. The company later became Pinkerton & Co and finally Pinkerton National Detective Agency, still in existence today as Pinkerton Consulting and Investigations, a subsidiary of Securitas AB.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

Book Review: In Search of Your German Roots

Grace A. Dow Memorial Library in Midland, Michigan Sustains $1.5 Million Flood Damage

Hard Drives and Storage Space Continue to Become Cheaper and Cheaper

McLennan County, Texas, Marriage Records Since 1850 are being Digitized

The International African American Museum Launches an African American Genealogy Center

A Short Note from Dick Eastman

You’ll notice there have been fewer articles than usual this past week. The reason is simple: I made a mistake.

I went to see my doctor for a quarterly check-up a few days ago. I should never have done that. During the visit, I complained that I was taking too many prescriptions for my diabetes and that they all seem to have undesirable side effects. She countered by giving me a new prescription in addition to all the others I have been taking. Stupid me. I had the new prescription filled and starting taking it as directed.

I spent the following three days in bed most of the time.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Colorado, Florida, and New York

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast

Somerset Baptisms Index

Our new collection of Somerset Baptisms is an index to more than 2.1 million parish baptisms held at the Somerset Archives. The collection consists of transcripts spanning the years 1501 to 1917 and covers baptisms performed in 496 parishes across the county. The amount of information found in each record will depend on the date and legibility of the original document. Most transcripts will reveal your ancestor’s date of birth, baptism date, where the ceremony was preformed, their religious denomination, parent’s names and father’s occupation.

Somerset Banns Index

Forces War Records Offers a New Collection: Pipers of Scottish and Overseas Regiments 1914-18

The following announcement was written by Forces War Records:

There is a long history of Bagpipes and the British Army, and whilst they weren’t officially recognised until 1854, much of the Army’s battles since the mid-1700s had been fought with piper’s playing. The original purpose of the pipes in battle was to signal tactical movements to the troops during battle.

By the time of WWI it was not only the Scottish, or even British Regiments that had pipe bands, with Commonwealth countries such as Canada, Australia or even South Africa having regiments with their own Pipers. The bag pipes importance in linking the men back to the history of their unit, and of their homeland was not under appreciated. The sound and swirl of the pipes boosted morale amongst the troops and intimidated the enemy. However, unarmed and drawing attention to themselves these extraordinary men were sitting ducks as they went over the top to pipe their men into battle as pipers were always an easy target for the enemy guns.

Grace A. Dow Memorial Library in Midland, Michigan Sustains $1.5 Million Flood Damage

Here is still another example why we cannot depend upon paper documents alone to be accessible in the future. Homes, streets, businesses, parks and city buildings in Midland, Michigan got soaked in a flood several weeks ago. In the city alone, more than 1,000 homes had some type of damage. Of interest to genealogists, the hardest hit city building was the Grace A. Dow Memorial Library. The early estimate puts clean up and repair work for the library at $1.5 million.

The library had never flooded before.

Book Review: In Search of Your German Roots

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

In Search of Your German Roots

by Angus Baxter.
This Fifth Edition was updated and revised by Marian Hoffman.
Genealogical Publishing Co. 2015. 125 pages.

Angus Baxter wrote the first through the fourth editions of In Search of Your German Roots. His daughter Susan Baxter updated the fourth edition (2008), and Marian Hoffman updated this fifth edition. Mr. Baxter died in 2005, and his name remains as author.

This is not a large book, but it’s dense with information about Germans, Germany, and German records research. Chapters and sections are:

Hard Drives and Storage Space Continue to Become Cheaper and Cheaper

The following isn’t directly related to genealogy but it is related to something that concerns all genealogists: storage of information that we have found. Today, it is easier and much, much cheaper to save information in our own computers or in the cloud than ever before. Saving things in digital format is also much, much cheaper (and safer) than storing paper. However, there are signs that consumers are saving less and less these days.

For the past 35+ years or so, hard drives prices have dropped, from around $500,000 per gigabyte in 1981 to less than $0.03 per gigabyte today. See http://www.mkomo.com/cost-per-gigabyte-update for details.

Somewhat surprisingly, manufacturers are selling fewer disk drives to consumers these days than they used to. Consumers are not downloading and saving as many files as they used to, be it text information, music, videos, or anything else. Why not? It appears that the primary reason is that all those things are increasingly more available upon demand in the cloud. There is less need than ever to save things yourself when you can retrieve those items again and again in the future at any time. Even better, the version you retrieve in the future may be updated or be an enhanced version, such as a higher-resolution image or video or contain higher-fidelity sound.

The International African American Museum Launches an African American Genealogy Center

The following announcement was written by the folks at the International African American Museum:

CHARLESTON, SC – Today, the International African American Museum (IAAM) announced the launch of its Center for Family History – an innovative national genealogy research center dedicated solely to celebrating and researching African American ancestry. The center will engage in genealogy education, original research, community archiving, public outreach, and collections. It will also assist with DNA testing.

The Center for Family History is the International African American Museum’s first program launch. It will engage visitors online now at www.iaamuseum.org, and in one of the most prominent gallery spaces in the museum.

Pass It Down Reinvents the Greeting Card to Help Capture Family Memories

I haven’t had this in my hands yet but it certainly looks interesting. Here is the announcement from Pass It Down:

greetingStory™ makes it simple and fun to capture family stories one greeting card at a time.



Chattanooga, Tenn. (July 18, 2017) – Pass It Down, an award-winning storytelling platform that makes it easy to digitally record and preserve family memories, announced today the launch of its first physical product, greetingStory™. greetingStory™ reinvents the greeting card, making it easy to capture family memories and handwriting, reconnect with loved ones and preserve family stories.

Live Cannonball (or is it a Mortar Shell?) from the Battle of the Plains of Abraham found in Old Quebec

A cannonball fired by the British during the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759 has been unearthed at a building site in Old Quebec. The rusted, 90-kilogram projectile was unearthed during excavation work last week at the corner of Hamel and Couillard streets and still contained a charge and gunpowder.

One person took the cannonball back to his home, and noticed it still contained a charge. A team of army munitions technicians was dispatched from CFB Valcartier to collect the ball and neutralize it.

McLennan County, Texas, Marriage Records Since 1850 are being Digitized

McLennan County Clerk Andy Harwell and his staff have undertaken a project to digitally scan and preserve county marriage records from 1850 to 1996. After six weeks of work, the documents have been digitized, but that’s just a start, Harwell said. The county hired Edoc Technologies for about $36,000 to perform the digitization work, and Harwell’s staff is starting to index the more than 170,000 marriage records by groom’s name, bride’s name and date.

“You’ll be able to sit at home and research in McLennan County back to 1850,” Harwell said. “So if we would have had a fire or tornado or something or a flood, we would have lost everything.”

You can read more in an article by Cassie L. Smith in the Waco Tribune web site at: http://bit.ly/2v3qaXt.

Fire Damages Eckhart Public Library in Auburn, Indiana

Fire caused extensive damage to Eckhart Public Library early Sunday morning, July 2. The fire appears to have been intentionally set. The damage will force the 106-year-old main library building to close indefinitely, according to the library leaders.

The library’s entire collection of DVDs and audio books was lost. However, the library’s digital collection of eBooks and downloadable audiobooks remain available along with the many online databases. Luckily, the library’s extensive genealogy collection appears to have been spared.

Details may be found at http://bit.ly/2vooPdb and at http://www.epl.lib.in.us.

Canadian Expeditionary Force Personnel Service Files Online

Library and Archives Canada has been digitizing World War I service files for some time. In an update issued today, Library and Archives Canada stated:

“As of today, 461,575 of 640,000 files are available online in our Personnel Records of the First World War database. Please visit the Digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service Files page for more details on the digitization project.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Over 121,000 new Roman Catholic Parish records covering the Diocese of Westminster have been added to the Catholic Heritage Archive this Findmypast Friday, including:

England Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms

Over 94,000 records covering parishes throughout the Catholic Diocese of Westminster have been added to our collection of English Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms. Each record will include both a transcript and an image of the original document. The amount of information in each transcript may vary depending on the age of the original record, its legibility, and the amount of detail recorded by the parish priest at the time of the event. Images may provide additional information about your ancestor such as the names of their godparents, the minister who performed the baptism, and the parent’s residence. Some registers will even include notes about the individual’s marriage.

England Roman Catholic Parish Marriages

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of July 10, 2017

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 14 July 2017–FamilySearch published new historic records this week from Brazil (about 4 million civil registration records), Chile, France, Netherlands, New Jersey, Nicaragua, Ohio, Peru, Russia, and BillionGraves. Search then for free at FamilySearch or by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

TheGenealogist launches over 1.3 million Parish Records for Northumberland

The following announcement was written by TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has expanded its UK Parish Records collection with the release of over 1,363,000 new records for Northumberland. These records make it easier to find your ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burials in these fully searchable records that cover the ancient parishes of the northernmost county of England. Some of the records can take you as far back as 1560.

In this release you can find the records of:
903,314 individuals in Baptisms, 157,329 individuals in Marriages and 302,378 individuals in Burials

Use these records to find the names of ancestors, parents’ forenames (in the case of baptisms), father’s occupation (where given), abode or parish, parish that the event took place in, the date of the event, in the case of marriage records, the bride’s maiden name and the witnesses’ names.

Four members of Accredited Genealogists Ireland Appointed to Positions of Influence

The following announcement was written by Accredited Genealogists Ireland:

Four members of Accredited Genealogists Ireland have recently been appointed to positions of influence. One has been appointed a member of the National Archives Advisory Council; another elected a vice-president of the Irish Genealogical Research Society; and two appointed members of the Irish Manuscripts Commission.

John Grenham is one of the 12 members of the National Archives Advisory Council (NAAC), recently appointed by Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Heather Humphreys TD. The NAAC is a statutory body with remit to advise the Director of the National Archives of Ireland on policy and practical matters. John is a longstanding member of AGI and is known internationally as the author of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors, now in its fourth edition.

Paul Gorry has been elected a vice-president of the Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS). Founded in 1936, the IGRS is a learned society and the world’s oldest organisation dedicated to the study and pursuit of Irish genealogy. Paul is a past president of AGI and with his AGI colleague Máire Mac Conghail is co-author of Tracing Irish Ancestors, published in 1997.