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Learn More About Your Ancestors by Having Their Handwriting Analyzed

The following article was written by Jean Maguire, describing a recent presentation by Kathi McKnight at the Colorado Genealogical Society. This article is republished here with Jean’s permission:

Colorado Genealogical Society welcomes
Kathi McKnight, Hand Writing Expert
October 21, 2017
By Jean Maguire

My interest in hand writing analysis began when I was accused of stealing narcotic drugs while a nurse at Swedish Hospital. Drugs were missing from the pharmacy and the drug cart and signed out with my name. Since my name was all over charts and medication records, it was easy to copy my signature. Quietly, a wonderful person in human resources began checking my handwriting and other nurses on my floor. My handwriting did not match and the drug addict was apprehended and sent to rehab.

Handwriting analysis has been used since Aristotle. Eighty percent of companies in Europe and many Fortune 500 companies use it. Kathi McKnight is a Master Certified Graphologist; author of three books; and has analyzed thousands of documents since 1991. She is the go to person for TV shows; Dr. Oz; Washington Post; Sports Illustrated and many more.

Kathi let us know each of us has different handwriting, even though we were all taught in the same method. Handwriting analysis does not predict the future; does not tell age; does not tell sex, or reveal left or right handwriting. Even people with disabilities have different handwriting because handwriting comes from the brain and not from the hands.

Athens-Clarke County (Georgia) Library Announces Image Magazine Digitization Project

The following announcement was written by the Athens-Clarke County Library:

Athens-Clarke County Library announces Image Magazine digitization project funded by Digital Library of Georgia grant

ATHENS, Ga. – Image Magazine, one of the area’s first African American lifestyle magazines, has been has been digitized thanks to a $5,000 grant awarded to The Athens-Clarke County by the Digital Library of Georgia.

Image Magazine was published by Dr. Robert Harrison from 1977 through 1980, and it covered the social life of the local African American community. Harrison donated every issue of the magazine to the Athens-Clarke County Library’s Heritage Room earlier this year as part of the library’s Common Heritage project.

The library hosted digital scanning days and educational programs designed to help African American residents preserve their family histories as part of the Common Heritage program, which was funded by a National Endowment for Humanities grant. Harrison presented a lecture during the series about the historic Hiram House and was inspired to donate the magazines to support the project’s objectives.

A GIS Mapping Project to Accurately Document Every Grave in a Waxahachie Cemetery

A Geographic Information System (GIS Software) is designed to store, retrieve, manage, display, and analyze all types of geographic and spatial data. It stores data on geographical features and their characteristics. Surveyors and cartographers use GIS technology extensively. The same technology cn be used to document cemeteries. Waxahachie, Texas is one of the latest cities to use GIS technology to document history at the Waxahachie City Cemetery.

The mapping project will record biographical information of each person buried as well as the location of each grave. This information will then be put into an interactive map that residents can view through the city’s website. The result will be a map that will have a look similar to a Google map. It will be an aerial view that will show the terrain of the cemetery. The map will show the different sections and allow people to zoom in and out.

MyHeritage DNA Announces a Last Minute Holiday Sale: Only $49 US each if you Purchase 2 or More DNA Testing Kits

MyHeritage has announced a special DNA LAST MINUTE holiday sale! Starting today, December 12th, through December 18th, DNA kits will be available for only $49 US (€45/£39) each when you buy 2 or more kits. The price for one kit hasn’t changed and it’s still $59 (€49/£45).

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The MyHeritage DNA kits make for a truly special and unique holiday gift for the entire family. As stated in the announcement:

Why choose MyHeritage DNA?

  • MyHeritage DNA covers 42 ethnic regions with percentages — more than any other major DNA vendor
  • The fastest processing time — only 3-4 weeks
  • International database improving your chances of finding relatives around the world
  • Fully integrated with family tree tools and historical records to expand your family research

By the way, I ordered three kits myself this morning.

Click here to obtain more information or to order the kits.

Did you see the Today Show segment on home DNA testing kits comparing the tests from 3 separate brands? Jeff Rossen revealed DNA results from the three leading brands, for sisters who are identical triplets. Check it out in the video below:

Findmypast Creates Brand New Collection for Tracing Immigrants from the British Isles

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

  • Vast new collection has been specially curated by Findmypast’s in-house experts
  • The new British and Irish Roots collection allows researchers to search a wide variety of records spanning more than 400 years of migration between the British Isles and North America, all in one place
  • All 95 million records within this unique resource are now available to search and will be free of charge for a limited period

Leading family history website, Findmypast, has announced the creation of a brand new resource that has been specifically designed to help U.S. researchers trace their family’s British and Irish heritage.

The British and Irish Roots Collection is a unique database consisting of more than 98 million assorted records that have been hand-picked from existing collections by Findmypast’s in-house experts.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

MyHeritage Adds United States WWI Draft Registrations, 1917-1918

Facebook Users want to Continue Posting from Beyond the Grave
The Security of Your Mother’s Maiden Name
MacFamilyTree 8.1 – New CloudTree offers Collaboration and Sync
Library of Congress, Digital Public Library of America To Form New Collaboration
Fold3 Commemorates Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary with Free Access to WWII Records and Stories Honoring Living Survivors
Freedmen Bureau Celebration to be Broadcast Live on the Internet
Maine’s Alien Registry of 1940 is Available Online
Millions of New Parish Records added to the TheGenealogist
Mississippi State University Libraries Digitize Civil War Diaries and Letters
New Records Available to Search this Findmypast Friday
New Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records Available to Search at Findmypast
Providence (Rhode Island) Public Library opens a large Genealogical Collection to the Public
Records of (Some) Irish Soldiers Now Available Online
NGS Family History Writing Contest Nominations Are Now Being Accepted
Los Angeles to Bury 1,430 Unclaimed Deceased Bodies
What Was Your Ancestor’s Property Worth?
pCloud: Better than Dropbox?
The Myths About Chromebooks
Manufacturer Refurbished Asus Chromebook Flip C100PA
Seth Meyers’ Family History
No, Not a Professional Gynecologist!
It is the First Day of the Month: Back Up Your Genealogy Files
Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy EvenIn order to read the Plus Edition newsletter, you will need to know your user name and password. If you have forgotten your user name and password, you can retrieve them at: http://www.eogn.com/amember/member.php

(+) When Your Descendants Become Curious About Their Ancestors

Introducing MyHeritage Surveys for Those Who took a MyHeritage DNA Test or Uploaded Their DNA Test to MyHeritage

Book Review: In Search of a Fair Wind – The Sea Letters of Georgia Townsend Yates, 1891-1892

Genealogy Data Entry Techniques

How to Transfer Cassette Tapes to a Computer for Long-Term Preservation

Why You’re Probably Related to Nefertiti, Confucius, and Socrates … and Most Everyone Else

Hands on with the $149.99 Insignia™ NS-P11A8100 11.6-inch Tablet with Removable Keyboard

Richmond Whig And Commercial Journal now Available on the Virginia Newspaper Project

The Virginia Newspaper Project has announced digitized copies of Richmond Whig and Commercial Journal, a daily published by John Hampden Pleasants and Josiah Abbot from 1831-1832, are now available on Virginia Chronicle web site.

Thanks to a partnership with the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, which generously shared its collection with the Library of Virginia, the digitized issues on Virginia Chronicle represent a nearly complete run of Richmond Whig and Commercial Journal. This title is one among many in the Whig family of newspapers published in Richmond during the nineteenth century.

Details may be found in the announcement at: http://bit.ly/2A8Zu9J.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Connecticut, Missouri. and New York

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

(+) When Your Descendants Become Curious About Their Ancestors

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

You probably have enjoyed collecting bits and pieces of information about your ancestors and their lives. Is it possible that one of your future descendants will want to do the same for you and for your present relatives? If so, should you help your future genealogist-descendant by making sure the information about your life and the lives of your relatives will be available in the future?

For years, genealogists, historians, and others have preserved information on paper. Sometimes it is in the form of books while a less formal method is to collect paper documents and keep them in a file. Paper has served us well for centuries and probably will not disappear anytime soon. However, paper isn’t as useful or expected to last as long as it once was. Perhaps we should seek alternative solutions.

From e-journals and e-books to emails, blogs and more, electronic content is proliferating fast, and organizations worldwide are racing to preserve information for the next generations before technological obsolescence, or even data loss, creep in.

Why You’re Probably Related to Nefertiti, Confucius, and Socrates … and Most Everyone Else

An article by Stephen Johnson in the BigThink web site states:

Nefertiti

“The theory of evolution holds that all living things have common ancestors. But just how far back do humans need to go to find a common ancestor of their own: a person to whom all living people are related?

“The answer, for people of European descent at least, is surprisingly recent: 600 years. The common ancestor for every single person alive on the planet today, no matter where, lived approximately 3,600 years ago. That means Confucius, Nefertiti, Socrates, and any figure from ancient history that had children, is in some way your ancestor.”

First Genetic Map of Ireland Unlocks Secrets About Ancestors

The first genetic map of the people of Ireland has been produced by scientists at the Royal College of Surgeons and by genealogical researchers at the Genealogical Society of Ireland. The Irish DNA Atlas; Revealing Fine-Scale Population Structure and History within Ireland has been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The study has found that prior to the mass movement of people in recent decades, there were at least 10 distinct genetic clusters found in specific regions across Ireland. It also revealed that seven of those clusters discovered so far are of ‘Gaelic’ Irish ancestry and match the borders of either Irish provinces or historical kingdoms. The other three are of shared Irish-British ancestry, and are mostly found in the north of Ireland and probably reflect the Ulster Plantations.

The Irish DNA Atlas also found that two of the ‘Gaelic’ clusters together align with the boundaries of the province of Munster.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

British & Irish Roots Collection

Explore this unique resource, handpicked by our in-house experts. Our new British & Irish roots collection brings together more than 95 million records from across a wide variety of records covering the United States and Canada. Each record identifies a British or Irish emigrant who came to North America. For example, Findmypast identified a population register from California that noted that a widow was Scottish and pulled this record into the collection. This new, first-of-its-kind collection gives North American family historians the chance to search for their British and Irish roots all in one place. The collection includes passenger lists, census records, naturalization applications, and draft registrations, as well as birth, marriage, and death records. The journeys researchers can expect to find include:

  • Anyone leaving the UK or Ireland and emigrating to the US, Canada or the Caribbean
  • Anyone emigrating from Canada or the Caribbean to the US (this covers the large number of British and Irish emigrants who stopped temporarily in Canada and/or the Caribbean)
  • Anyone listed on any US or Canadian record with British or Irish origins, birthplace or parents

British Army, Imperial War Museum Bond of Sacrifice 1914-1918

Introducing MyHeritage Surveys for Those Who took a MyHeritage DNA Test or Uploaded Their DNA Test to MyHeritage

The MyHeritage Blog has announced a new service from the company that will “investigate how genetics affects various aspects of our lives.” The announcement says (in part):

“At MyHeritage, we constantly discover new ways for our users to explore their origins and learn more about who they are. Our Science Team, led by world-renowned genetics pioneer Dr. Yaniv Erlich, recently released surveys — a cutting-edge research project to help us investigate how genetics affects various aspects of our lives, with the cooperation of the MyHeritage community.

New BT27 UK Outbound Passenger Lists Go Online for the 1930s Decade

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

Queen Mary on her maiden voyage 1936; from TheGenealogist’s Image Archive

TheGenealogist has just released over 2.7 million BT27 records for the 1930s. These Outbound Passenger Lists are part of an expanding immigration and emigration record set on TheGenealogist that feature the historical records of passengers who sailed out of United Kingdom ports in the years between 1930 and 1939. With the release of this decade of records, the already strong Immigration, Emigration, Naturalisation and passenger list resources on TheGenealogist have been expanded again.

The fully searchable BT27 records from The National Archives released today will allow researchers to:

“A Date Which Will Live in Infamy”

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941, stunned virtually everyone in the United States. Pearl Harbor was totally unprepared. 353 Japanese planes mounted a surprise assault on American naval forces stationed in Hawaii. The attack killed 2,403 United States personnel, injured 1,178, drew the United States into World War II, and altered the course of history forever.

President Franklin Roosevelt quickly addressed Congress to ask for a declaration of war. This action was soon followed by declaration of war with Germany and, soon after, with Italy.

Today is the appropriate time to pause and reflect on the events of 76 years ago today. Let us vow to never again allow any nation ever catch us unprepared.

Hands on with the $149.99 Insignia™ NS-P11A8100 11.6-inch Tablet with Removable Keyboard

I had a chance this week to use a new (to me) low-cost Insignia™ NS-P11A8100 tablet computer. I thought I would write about it here as many people are looking for potential Christmas presents or perhaps a tablet to add to one’s own “Christmas wish list.”

I selected the Insignia™ NS-P11A8100 tablet primarily because it is cheap. While it has a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $199, BestBuy is selling it for $149.99. That is ridiculously cheap for an Android tablet with an 11.6” screen and a keyboard. After reading all the specifications, I visited a nearby BestBuy store and purchased one.

I plan to use the new tablet computer to run genealogy apps as well as dozens of other uses. It can surf the web, read and write email, run any of several word processing programs and spreadsheets, do everything on Facebook, and run all sorts of other applications for many different uses (see https://play.google.com/store/search?q=Android%20apps for information about the thousands of Android apps available). It even has dozens of genealogy apps available; most of them are available free of charge. (See https://play.google.com/store/search?q=genealogy&c=apps). I am primarily using it with MyHeritage’s genealogy app as well as BillionGraves.

100 Years Ago Today the Halifax Explosion nearly destroyed Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

On the morning of 6 December 1917, the SS Mont-Blanc, a French cargo ship laden with high explosives left the dock in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and headed for Bordeaux, France. The explosives were destined to be used by the French military in World War I. At 8:45 AM, the SS Mont-Blanc collided with the Norwegian vessel SS Imo in the Narrows, a strait connecting the upper Halifax Harbour to Bedford Basin. A fire broke out on the French cargo ship. 20 minutes after the collision, at 9:04:35 am, the SS Mont-Blanc exploded.

The blast destroyed both ships along with most of the Richmond district of Halifax. Approximately 2,000 people were killed, about 500 of them children, by the blast or by flying debris, fires or collapsed buildings. An estimated 9,000 others were injured.

The Halifax Explosion was one of the worst disasters in North American history. It was the largest man-made explosion prior to the development of nuclear weapons, releasing the equivalent energy of roughly 2.9 kilotons of TNT.

Council of Irish Genealogical Organisations Launches an Online Petition for the Early Release of the 1926 Census

The following announcement was written by the Council of Irish Genealogical Organisations:

On 6th December 2017 CIGO is launching an online petition calling on the Government of Ireland to honour the commitment given in the 2011 Programme for Government to release the 1926 Census of Ireland.

The date has two historical associations for Ireland. It was on the 6th December 1921 that the Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed and exactly one year later the Irish Free State was established.

Ireland has a sad history with regard to the preservation of census returns. After a series of administrative blunders and the subsequent fire in the Public Records Office during the Civil War in 1922, only fragments of the 19th century census returns now survive.

The period between 1911 and 1926 was one of great change in Ireland: the Great War, Easter Rising, War of Independence, Partition and then the Civil War. All this upheaval led to significant internal migration and overseas emigration.

Call for Papers: 2019 Annual Conference of the Ohio Genealogical Society

The following announcement was written by the folks at the Ohio Genealogical Society:

December 1, 2017 — Bellville, Ohio: The Ohio Genealogical Society (OGS) announces a request for lecture proposals for its 2019 conference, “Building A Heritage,” to be held May 1 – 4, 2019, at the Great Wolf Lodge in Mason, Ohio.

Topics being considered include: Ohio history, its records, and repositories; ethnic (African American, German, Irish, Polish, etc.); religious groups; migration into, within, and out of Ohio; origins of early Ohio settlers, and the Old Northwest Territory. Other topics of interest that will be considered include: land and military records; technology; DNA; mobile devices and apps; social media; and methodology, analysis, and problem solving in genealogical research