MyHeritage Announces a DNA Day Sale through April 25


This is an excellent chance to save on a DNA test for yourself… or give two or three of them to others.

Click here to learn more.

Help Wanted: a Pescatarian Archives Supervisor at Prince’s Paisley Park

I know a number of archivists read this newsletter on a regular basis so I will post this article for them. The rock star Prince’s Paisley Park estate outside Minneapolis became a permanent museum in 2016 following the musician’s passing. The estate is now looking for an archives supervisor to overlook the maintenance of their artifacts (which include his remains in an urn). They’ve posted a job listing to the American Alliance of Museums’ career website for a full-time position in the Archives Department.

The job posting includes all the regular items you might expect:

  • Actively work in the care, catalog, storage and preservation of all artifacts and archival materials; the care, cleaning, and monitoring of all exhibits.
  • Maintain and Update the archival database system.
  • Monitor the trafficking of archive inventory.
  • Assist the appropriate staff in having access to the archives collection as required.
  • and much more.

However, there is one requirement of the job that I am not used to seeing in help wanted ads: “must adhere to a pescatarian environment.”

FamilySearch Adds 2 Billionth Image of Genealogy Records

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch reaches publishing milestone of 2 billion images of searchable genealogy records online.Salt Lake City, Utah (23 April 2018), In your quest to discover your family history it might be time to take another look at FamilySearch’s online offerings. The genealogy giant’s free online databases of digitized historical documents have now surpassed 2 billion images of genealogy records with millions more being added weekly from countries around the world. Nonprofit FamilySearch, a global leader in historical genealogy records preservation and access, announced the milestone today.

Last September FamilySearch transitioned from its microfilm circulation services to a new digital model that makes its massive genealogical records collections more broadly and readily accessible online (See UPDATE: FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm). Today’s announcement reinforces its continuing commitment to grow online genealogy resources. FamilySearch currently adds over 300 million new images a year online from its microfilm to digital and field operations efforts.

The free genealogy records include censuses, birth, marriage, death, court, immigration and other document types that are invaluable for individuals to make personal family history discoveries and connections. A host of online volunteers (See FamilySearch Indexing), partners, and emerging technologies help to eventually create searchable name indexes to the images, but in the meantime, images (digital photos) can be browsed and saved.

The digital image only collections can be viewed at FamilySearch in three points of access:

CBC Urged to Preserve Master Recordings of Radio and TV Programming after Making Digital Copies

NOTE: This is a follow-up to my earlier article, CBC (English-language) and Radio-Canada (French) Music Library Closing, CD’s to be Digitised, Destroyed, at http://bit.ly/2K9nIpF.

CBC News is reporting:

“The Canadian Broadcast Museum Foundation (CBMF) is urging CBC to stop destroying original radio and television programming after making digital copies, arguing these master recordings are irreplaceable.

“The Toronto charitable foundation said in a release Wednesday that CBC’s English Services began destroying original radio and TV programming at the beginning of April.

Pennsylvania State Archives Archival Training Workshops

The following announcement was written by the Pennsylvania State Archives and State Historical Records Advisory Board:

The Pennsylvania State Archives (PSA) and State Historical Records Advisory Board (SHRAB), in partnership with Erie Maritime Museum and the Franklin County Historical Society, are pleased to announce the Spring 2018 Archives Without Tears workshop schedule. The workshops will be held June 5-6 at Erie Maritime Museum, Erie, PA and June 13–14 at the Franklin County Historical Society, Chambersburg, PA. These are the only sessions planned for 2018. Click here for registration information.

Archives Without Tears is an affordable workshop open to anyone who works, interns or volunteers for organizations that deal with archival records—whether it’s a museum; private, non-profit, or college archives; the city clerk’s office; the library’s local history room; or a historic site. The workshop provides practical advice, sample forms and policies, and discusses archival best practices, disaster planning and response, and records management principles so that staff can collect, preserve, and assist researchers with the archival records in their care.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Use an Old Computer as a Backup Server

The MyHeritage DNA Quest Pro Bono Project helping Adoptees is now Global

Hands On with a 256 Gigabyte Flash Drive

Never Throw Away Records of People!

(US) Department of Commerce Announces Changes to Limited Access Death Master File (also called the Social Security Death Index, or SSDI)

Ancestry Names Margo Georgiadis Chief Executive Officer

April 25 is National DNA Day in the U.S.

Libraries and Archives Canada Introduces Co-Lab, a Tool to Collaborate on Historical Records

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

United Kingdom, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, New Mexico, and Oregon

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

(+) Use an Old Computer as a Backup Server

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Back in the old days of home computers, say twenty years ago, most of us had one free-standing computer in the house, and the whole family shared it. Those days are now long gone. Many families, perhaps most, now have multiple computers. As computers have become more affordable, portable, and necessary, it’s now common to find multiple computers scattered throughout a home. There is often one desktop or laptop or tablet computer per family member. In fact, most of our cell phones are also computers these days. With today’s technology, the in-home computers are easily connected together by a network, sharing one Internet connection.

If you already have a broadband connection with a router, you probably already have a network installed whether you know it or not. If you have wi-fi installed at home, you definitely have a network.

While many people may not realize it, once the network is installed, it is easy to also share printers, disk drives, and more. It’s even easy to share the resources among different operating systems. For instance, in my home we have Windows, Macintosh, Chromebook, Linux, iPad, Android and “smartphone” computers all connected together via a mix of wired and wi-fi wireless connections. (Yes, we do own too many computers!) All the computers share the same Internet connection, the same two printers, and the same file server for storage of backup files.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 1.1 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

British Army Officers’ Widows’ Pension Forms 1755-1908

Indexed online for the first time, British Army Officers’ Widows’ Pension Forms 1755 – 1908, spans more than 150 years of British military history and contains over 13,000 transcripts and scanned images taken from The National Archives series “WO 42: War Office: Officers’ Birth Certificates, Wills and Personal Papers”. The collection consists of bundles of original documents submitted in support of pension claims made by the widows of British Army officers. It covers the families of officers who died in service or on half pay as well as compassionate allowances awarded to the children of both deceased and disabled officers.

These bundles include a variety of original army forms and supporting documents including original application forms completed by widows, marriage and death details of the officers in question, as well as death certificates, marriage certificates, birth certificates and baptismal records for their wives and children.

Somerset Registers & Records

New Records on FamilySearch: Week of April 16, 2018

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Discover your ancestors on FamilySearch this week in almost 3.5 million records from Oklahoma, 1.5 million from Germany and more from Quebec, ItalyLesothoIrelandPeruGeorgiaTexasCosta Rica, and Poland.Search these new free records by clicking on the collection links below or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

(US) Department of Commerce Announces Changes to Limited Access Death Master File (also called the Social Security Death Index, or SSDI)

The following report was written by Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson of the IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee and published originally on the IAJGS Public Records Access Alert mailing list:

The (US) Department of Commerce announced that effective April 1, 2018 the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) implemented upgrades to modernize and enhance access to the Limited Access Death Master File (LADMF). One of the changes is their new website accessible at: https://ladmf.ntis.gov/  You will have to register at the site to familiarize yourself with and the new subscription options.

You may recall that when the proposed  certification to the LADMF was announced, genealogists basically could not be certified as they could not  meet the onerous requirements for business security and the cost of subscriptions. The submitted testimonies by various genealogical groups, including the IAJGS and the Records  Preservation and Monitoring Committee (RPAC) of which IAJGS is a sponsoring member fell on “deaf ears”.

The remainder of the notice sent to IAJGS is copied in its entirety below as it is not posted to their website:

Findmypast Publishes More of The National Archives’ Collection of British Army officers’ Widows’ Pension Forms

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

  • British Army officers’ widows’ pension forms spanning the years 1755 – 1908 indexed online for the first time
  • Over 13,000 records, including transcripts and scanned images of original documents, now available to searchLeading British family history website, Findmypast, today announces the publication of a new online collection of British Army Pension records held by The National Archives.

    Indexed online for the first time, British Army Officers’ Widows’ Pension Forms 1755 – 1908, spans more than 150 years of British military history and contains over 13,000 transcripts and scanned images taken from The National Archives series “WO 42: War Office: Officers’ Birth Certificates, Wills and Personal Papers”.

SLIG Scholarship Opportunities

The following announcement was written by the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy:

SLIG is pleased to announce that applications are currently being accepted for the following SLIG scholarships.

SLIG Jimmy B. Parker Scholarship: Named in honor of Jimmy B. Parker, this scholarship recognizes those who have “demonstrated commitment to genealogical excellence and community involvement”. Parker’s legacy of more than 50 years of service serves as the guideline for the application essay detailing how attending SLIG will help the applicant enhance their ability to serve or prepare them to give back to the genealogical community.

The Genealogy of First Lady Barbara Bush

The following was written by the New England Historic Genealogical Society:

As America Mourns Barbara Bush, Genealogists at New England Historic Genealogical Society Announce She Was Related to Ten Presidents,  Including her Husband, and to Prince William

April 19, 2018—Boston, Massachusetts—As the nation mourned the passing of one of its most-beloved American First Ladies, the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) remembered Barbara Pierce Bush, a woman whose life will be noted as one of only two in the nation’s history to be both the wife and mother of an American President, and who was related to ten presidents (including her husband and son) and to European royalty. Her funeral is set for Saturday.

Ancestry Names Margo Georgiadis Chief Executive Officer

The following announcement was written by Ancestry.com:

Appointment Concludes Six-Month Global Search

Interim CEO Howard Hochhauser to Return to Role as CFO and COO

LEHI, Utah and SAN FRANCISCO — April 19, 2018 — Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, today announced that its Board of Directors has appointed Margo Georgiadis as Chief Executive Officer and member of the Board of Directors. Georgiadis will join the company on May 10, 2018. Most recently Georgiadis served as Chief Executive Officer of Mattel, Inc. and prior to that as President, Americas, at Google Inc. Georgiadis will succeed Howard Hochhauser, who has served as interim CEO since October 2017 while the Board conducted a comprehensive six-month search for a permanent CEO. Hochhauser will return to his role as Ancestry’s CFO and COO.

“I am thrilled to join Ancestry at a dynamic period of accelerated growth and innovation,” said Georgiadis. “Ancestry is incredibly well-positioned for continued success and rapid expansion, as millions of consumers around the world embark on their journey of self-discovery with us. I am excited to help realize Ancestry’s mission to connect the world and enhance our consumers’ understanding of who they are and where they come from. In partnership with the world-class Ancestry team, together we will seek to drive the company to new heights.”

April 25 is National DNA Day in the U.S.

National DNA Day commemorates the successful completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and the discovery of DNA’s double helix in 1953. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) began celebrating DNA Day annually on April 25th after the 108th Congress passed concurrent resolutions designating it as DNA Day. The goal of National DNA Day is to offer students, teachers and the public an opportunity to learn about and celebrate the latest advances in genomic research and explore how those advances might impact their lives.

The Great Famine Voices Roadshow in the USA and Canada

For over a century and a half, shame and silence were the most common Irish responses to the calamity of the Great Hunger. A million dead, a million fled was the old saying, but concern over igniting further strife in the present (a particular concern during the Troubles) kept a lid on most discussions of it. But now a new roadshow coming to the USA and Canada plans to give voice to the descendants of famine era Irish immigrants, many for the first time.

The roadshow is being funded by the Emigrant Support Program of the Irish government. Thanks to a new initiative from the both the National Famine Museum in Strokestown Park and The Irish Heritage Trust, a series of free open house events will be held in the USA and Canada where descendants of Irish emigrants and the general public are welcome to come together and share their family memories and stories of coming to America, especially during the period of the Great Hunger, which was 1845 to 1852.

Never Throw Away Records of People!

The Home Office destroyed thousands of landing card slips recording Windrush immigrants’ arrival dates in the UK, despite staff warnings that the move would make it harder to check the records of older Caribbean-born residents experiencing residency difficulties.

Prime Minister Theresa May has apologised to Caribbean leaders over deportation threats made to the children of Commonwealth citizens, who despite living and working in the UK for decades, have been told they are living in the UK illegally because of a lack of official paperwork. The reason there is “a lack of official paperwork” is because the paperwork was destroyed by the government, not the fault of the immigrants or their children.

Who Owns a Cemetery?

An article in the Cowley (Kansas) CourierTimes highlights a frequent question: Who owns a cemetery?

Actually, in many parts of the U.S., most cemeteries have clearly identified owners. Municipal cemeteries are owned by the town or city. The local Catholic cemetery is obviously owned by the Catholic Church and other cemeteries may be owned by other religious organizations, fraternal organizations, while some others are owned by corporations or by non-profit cemetery associations. However, there are thousands of other cemeteries where ownership is not clearly defined.

One such case is the small, rural Liberty Cemetery in Arkansas City, Kansas.

SLIG Calls for Proposals

The following announcement was written by the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy:

The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) continues to reach out to advanced, experienced teaching professionals in the genealogical community for new course content, presentation, and publication proposals.

The following Calls for Proposals are now open:

SLIG 2020 Course Proposals: SLIG offers courses on local, state, regional, and international topics taught at an intermediate level or above; specific record types, skills, methodology, and related technologies or strategies are preferred at a high-intermediate to advanced level. Courses with hands-on learning opportunities are encouraged as well as those that fill educational needs not addressed elsewhere. The deadline for course proposals is August 1, 2018; inquiries are accepted at any time.