A DNA Super Sale is Now Available at MyHeritage

Click on the above image for more information.

(+) How to Preserve Newspaper Clippings

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Many family members collect newspaper clippings of marriages, death notices, birth announcements, school graduation announcements, and similar items. If kept under proper conditions, these newspapers clippings may last for generations. The key phrase in that statement is “if kept under proper conditions.”

In fact, there are several things you will want to do to preserve the information:

So Why Lock Up the Birth Records?

It seems that every week we hear of one more situations in which some politician or bureaucrat is trying to restrict access to public domain vital records. Everybody is trying to lock out everyone, including genealogists. Our right to access to public domain birth, marriage, and death information is being threatened constantly under the guise of “preventing identity theft.”

Balderdash!

(That’s as strong a word as I will use in this family-oriented publication.)

I am sure that the politicians love the limelight back home when they can brag that they have taken action to “prevent identity theft.” Heck, nobody is in favor of identity theft, right? Therefore, just proclaiming to have taken some token action under the smoke screen of “preventing identity theft” is sure to win a few more votes in the next election.

“Facts? What facts? Don’t bother me with facts, I’ve got a re-election campaign to win.”

Past Predictions about the Future of Electricity

On March 29, 1879, a widely circulated newspaper called the American Register published a scathing editorial stating that “it is doubtful if electricity will ever be [widely] used.” That statement apparently was based on the fact that electricity was too expensive to generate in 1879.

Several months later, the Select Committee on Lighting and Electricity in the British House of Commons held hearings on electricity, with experts stating that there was not “the slightest chance” that the world would run on electric power generation. In 1879, electricity was still considered an expensive fantasy.

Thomas Edison contradicted those statements a few months later, on New Years Eve. Edison publicly unveiled his incandescent light bulb in Menlo Park. At the time he allegedly stated “We will make electricity so cheap that only the rich will burn candles.”

It strikes me that none of those opposing predictions was accurate.

Have Polish Ancestry? You may be Able to Obtain Polish (and European Union) Citizenship

Thanks to Poland’s liberal citizenship laws, thousands of people of Polish descent born in the UK, US, Canada, Australia, Argentina, Israel, South Africa and many other countries hold dual nationality and an EU passport. There are many advantages of having Polish citizenship now that Poland is a part of the European Union. With Polish citizenship, doors to living, studying and working in Europe are open.

A past article in the Australian Times states:

New English Parish Registers & Scottish Wills Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Here’s what’s new this Findmypast Friday:

Scotland, Will and Testament Index 1481-1807

Did your ancestors die in Scotland? Explore this index of more than 164,000 records from the commissariat courts of Scotland between 1481 and 1807. Each record includes a transcript of the original will and testament that will reveal the date of the will and where it was made.

When an individual wishes to settle their affairs prior to death, a will is drawn up. The will sets out the instructions for the disposal of their possessions. A testament is the legal document that is drawn up after a person has died. This enables the court to confirm an executor, the executor is then responsible for the winding-up of the deceased’s estate. The testament includes an inventory of the deceased’s property, this can be a brief summary valuation of the goods involved or a list of individual items and their valuations.

Scotland Monumental Inscriptions

Irish Birth, Marriage, and Death Certificates Are Now Available Online for Free

A wealth of historical registers of marriages, births, and deaths are available to view for free on the website Irish Genealogy and covers births from 1864 to 1918, deaths from 1878 to 1968, and marriages from 1864 to 1943.

The new additions include deaths in 1967 and 1968, births in 1917 and 1918, and marriages from 1864 to 1869 and 1942 to 1943, meaning that those looking to delve into their family’s history online can now go deeper than ever before.

Details may be found in the IrishCentral web site at: https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/genealogy/irish-geneaology-resource-free.

Ancestry’s DNA Health Screening Will Require a Doctor’s Order

Ancestry said Tuesday that its new consumer health tests (described in an earlier article in this newsletter at https://tinyurl.com/eogn191017) will require authorization by a physician.

As mentioned in the original announcement: “Ancestry has partnered with PWNHealth, an independent network of board-certified physicians and genetic counselors, to offer these services, which are included in both AncestryHealth Core and AncestryHealth Plus.”

Ancestry Chief Executive Officer Margo Georgiadis says the company wanted to focus on providing ways for its tests to integrate easily into the care patients receive from their regular doctors.

Calendars Explained

What could be simpler than a calendar? The printed one from the local real estate office shows twelve months, each with 28 to 31 days. Simple, right?

Well, it hasn’t always been so simple. After all, I keep stumbling upon genealogy records that are logged with “double dates.” That is, a birth record might state “22 February 1732/3.” Which was it: 1732 or 1733? Well, it actually was both. Just to make things more complex, back in those days, most of our ancestors didn’t know what day it was. You see, most people in the early 1700s and earlier were illiterate. They couldn’t read a book, much less a calendar. Most people did not know what day it was or even how old they were. Very few remembered their own birthdays.

Throughout history, learned men kept track of the days, months, and years in a variety of ways. The ancient Egyptians began numbering their years when the star Sirius rose at the same place as the Sun. The Egyptian calendar was the first solar calendar and contained 365 days. These were divided into twelve 30-day months and five days of religious festival.

Follow-Up: How the Irish Man Hilariously Pranked His Family at His Own Funeral

This is a do-it-yourself article. You could do this yourself when the day comes. Well, you do have to have assistance from someone else at the funeral…

If you haven’t already read it, first read my earlier article, Irish Man Hilariously Pranks His Family at His Own Funeral, at https://blog.eogn.com/2019/10/14/irish-man-hilariously-pranks-his-family-at-his-own-funeral/. Now Andrea, the daughter of the dearly departed Irishman, has revealed how her late father came up with the idea more than a year earlier.

(When the video starts playing, click on the speaker icon near the lower right corner to enable the sound.)

The Best RSS Readers and News Aggregation Apps

I have written before about the many advantages of using RSS Newsreaders to quickly and easily find articles of interest published on dozens, even hundreds, of web sites that interest you, including the EOGN.com web site. You can find my earlier articles about RSS Newsreaders by starting at: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Aeogn.com+newsreader&t=brave&ia=web.

Brendan Hesse has posted an article that I think everyone should read: The Best RSS Readers and News Aggregation Apps. (I found this article by using my favorite RSS Newsreader, of course.) As Brendan writes, “Without further ado, here are the best RSS readers/news aggregators, plus a few alternatives for good measure.”

I also noted that he claims that Feedly is the best RSS Newsreader available today. I cannot say that I have tested as many newsreaders as Brendan Hesse has, but I will say that I have been using Feedly for several years and am pleased with it.

New Free Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of 14 October 2019

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

This week, FamilySearch.org added over 1 million new, free, historical records from France Marriages (1546-1924), and another million records from Uruguay Passenger Lists (1888-1980.) Other countries include England, Sweden, Uruguay and the United States, including Alabama, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York and Ohio. 

Search these new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

AncestryHealth Announces Genotype and Next Generation Genetic Sequencing Services

The following announcement was written by Ancestry:

LEHI, Utah & SAN FRANCISCO – (Oct. 15, 2019) – For more than 30 years, Ancestry®, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, has built innovative services that empower millions of people to make more meaningful discoveries about themselves and their families. First with family history, then through DNA and today, with the introduction of AncestryHealth®. AncestryHealth is a long-term commitment to making a difference in preventive health through personalized and actionable insights.

Through a highly supportive and guided experience, AncestryHealth services deliver actionable insights that can empower people to take proactive steps — in collaboration with their healthcare provider — to address potential health risks identified in their genes and family health history. In a recent AncestryDNA® customer survey, 83 percent of respondents said they are looking for new ways to improve their health and 89 percent said it is critical for their children to learn about improving their health.

Researching Slave Trader Ancestors

The web site of the University of Irvine, California (UCI) has an article about Stella Cardoza, an alumnus of the University, who successfully traced her ancestry back to 17th-century Spain and was able to identify her eighth great-grandfather, Juan Enríquez de Aponte. She did so by a combination of old-fashioned genealogy research and a lucky find on the Slave Voyages website which houses databases documenting almost four centuries of the slave trade from Africa to the Americas and within the New World.

Irish Man Hilariously Pranks His Family at His Own Funeral

I have been collecting humorous obituaries for a while. This story isn’t about an obituary but about something related, as created by a man with a similar sense of humor.

As described by Ellie Houghtaling in the Mashable web site:

Shay Bradley of Kilnamanagh in the south of Dublin, Ireland, passed October 8, but that didn’t mean he was ready to give up his life’s passion of pranking his family. When his coffin was lowered and the bag pipes began playing, something unusual happened – an audio recording of his voice began playing.

(When the video starts playing, click on the speaker icon near the lower right corner to enable the sound.)

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago.

The following articles are listed in this week’s Plus Edition email:

(+) Why You May Need to Hire a Professional Genealogist

The Truth about Christopher Columbus and His “Discoveries”

TMG to GEDCOM Version 1.00 Released

calibre 4.0 is Released with New E-Book Viewer and New Server Capabilities

Your Comments are Requested Concerning an Interim Policy Concerning Forensic Genetic Genealogical DNA Analysis and Searching

Responsible Genetic Genealogy

How can I Be Sure My ‘Re-print’ and ‘Use’ of Information in Newspaper Articles and Genealogy Books is ‘LEGAL?’

The Truth about Christopher Columbus and His “Discoveries”

Alternative Title: Columbus was Really Bad at Math

Almost all the “facts” you learned in school about Christopher Columbus are wrong! Amongst other things, Columbus never proved that the earth is round and he never set foot in what is now North America. A YouTube video below and also available at https://youtu.be/3MJoKhO9G1g sets the record straight.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

Ontario, California, Colorado, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

IGRS Revives its Student Membership Scheme

The following announcement was written by the Irish Genealogical Research Society:

The Irish Genealogical Research Society is pleased to announce that it has revived its Student Membership Scheme and admitted a young enthusiast under the category. Daniel Loftus, a teenager from Co. Cork, has been made a student member of the IGRS, with annual membership fees waived, for a period of three years.

The status was granted to offer encouragement for Daniel to develop experience and knowledge of genealogy. It was given in recognition of the commitment to the subject he has shown already in setting up a website, a blog and social media accounts to engage with people, sharing his enthusiasm for family history.

The Student Membership Scheme was first introduced over a decade ago and awarded at the discretion of the Society’s Council, though it has not been active in the past few years. This is the first time it has been granted to a secondary school student. Daniel responded ‘Wow, this is an honour!’ when informed that he was to receive this concession from the IGRS.

(+) Why You May Need to Hire a Professional Genealogist

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Genealogy research is a fascinating endeavor. After all, your family tree is a puzzle that needs to be solved. In fact, you are literally finding out where you came from. I strongly recommend that anyone with an interest in ancestry do their own research. After all, it is fun and challenging.

As author of this newsletter, I sometimes field questions from genealogy newcomers — questions like how they can hire someone to research their family tree for a fee. I typically respond with still another question and a comment: “Would you pay someone to play a round of golf for you? While that might complete the objective, you will miss out on the entire experience.”

Over 14 Million New Records Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Greater London Burial Index

Were your ancestors buried in Greater London? Over 45,000 new records covering 10 parishes across the region have been added to the index and are now available to search. The records in this collection date all the way back to 1399 and will reveal the date and location of your ancestor’s burial as well as their occupation, address, denomination and age at death.

The Greater London Burial Index is a collection of the Middlesex Burials & Memorial Inscriptions, South London Burials Index 1545-1905, City of London Burials 1754-1855 and Middlesex Burials 1538-1992. Each record contains the transcription of an original parish record. A small number of records will also provide you with an image provided by The National Archives and created by the College of Arms.

Middlesex Monumental Inscriptions