Findmypast Announces a Raft of New Partnerships as Part of its U.S. Growth Strategy

As mentioned in my earlier article at http://goo.gl/BI5BfM, Findmypast has always been known primarily as a company that supplies genealogy information from the British Isles. However, the company announced some time ago that would expand into North American records. My earlier article contained one announcement from the company of a major expansion of U.S. records being offered at Findmypast.com. At today’s RootsTech2016 conference in Salt Lake City, the company made another announcement that shows Findmypast’s serious efforts to become a major genealogy information provider in the U.S.

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Leading family history site, Findmypast announced today at RootsTech a range of new global partnerships with leading technology providers. This will further strengthen its reach in the U. S. as well as U.K. markets.

The raft of new partnerships include deals with RootsMagic, Legacy Family Tree, FamilySearch, Family-Historian, Puzzilla, Billion Graves and RootsCity. Findmypast will make its vast record collection of more than 8 billion records available to customers via these partners. The rollout of these partnerships will begin in 2016, with exact dates to be detailed later.

Customers using these various family history products will benefit from having Findmypast’s record collection embedded within the actual product in ways that each partner determines will benefit their customers most. Adding to the excitement, Findmypast also announced that in 2016 it will build on its extensive British and Irish data base by adding hundreds of millions of new U.S. records including the most comprehensive collection of US marriage records available anywhere.

Commenting Ben Bennett, Executive Vice-President North America and International for Findmypast said:

“2016 is going to see us expanding our partnerships across the U.S. Our aim is to provide our customers with more and more records and family history resources to aid them in their family history research. Regardless of where the customer is doing the research, Findmypast will bring the full benefit of the more than 8 billion records that Findmypast has in order to help them discover more about their family.”

Taking these essential steps to creating a healthy ecosystem of partnerships will help ensure that those searching for ancestors who have lived in the UK and/or the US can take full advantage of Findmypast’s world class record collections.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.
Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over eight billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitized records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States. Findmypast, in association with The National Archives, recently launched the 1939 Register, a record of 41 million lives on the eve of World War II.

http://www.findmypast.com/

2 Comments

Not sure how I feel about this. I already hate having to pay twice to access the newspaper archives as the search engines for the British Newspaper Archive and those for findmypast work differently. To make sure I have found everything I have to search both. The findmypast subscription is set to increase this month – more records will mean it will continue to increase each year.

The site is already difficult to search effectively unless you use the A-Z of records and search each dataset individually. Most family history researchers rely on the simple search boxes to search globally and I often wonder how much is being missed or not analysed properly to check it is the right record accepting the search engine’s view of what is relevant.

I also wonder what will happen when the licence to each dataset expires. Will findmypast renew it or will we lose access and have to go and pay some other provider to access records we have in our findmypast online tree but which are no longer housed by them? It has already happened as findmypast swallowed up Origins, and had already snapped up the Society of Genealogists data from Origins as presumably the licence ran out. It makes nonsense of website source citations.

That being said I agree wholeheartedly with increasing access to original records via digitisation and inclusion in online providers’ sites. But there are a lot of fundamental issues about record availability over time and the repeatability of online searches which I feel aren’t being addressed in the rush to expand and become ever more profitable.

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I recognize all of the new partners but one. What is RootsCity and where might one access it.

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