Findmypast Announces Online Release of Over 10 Million New US Marriage Records

Another major announcement has been made at the National Genealogical Company’s annual conference in Fort Lauderdale: Findmypast is releasing a huge batch of US marriage records. The following was written by Findmypast:

  • New records contain over 30 million names
  • Includes significant additions from Indiana, New York, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Maine
  • Includes 1 million names published online for the first time and only found on Findmypast

US_MarriagesLeading family history website, Findmypast , announced today at the 2016 conference of the National Genealogical Society the release of over 10 million new marriage records in the second installment of their United States Marriages collection.

Released in partnership with FamilySearch International, the records contain more than 30 million names, nearly 1 million of which have never before been published online and can only be found at Findmypast.

The release marks the second stage of an ambitious project that will see Findmypast digitize and publish the single largest online archive of U.S. marriages in history. Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will contain at least 100 million records and more than 450 million names from 2,800 counties across America.

While the United States Marriage collection includes marriages from nearly every state, this second installment includes significant additions from Indiana, New York, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Maine.

The records include marriage date, bride and groom names, birthplace, birth date, age, and residence as well as father’s and mother’s names. Customers with family trees on Findmypast will benefit from leads connecting relatives on their trees with the marriage records, thus generating a whole new source of research.

Commenting, Ben Bennett, Executive Vice-President North America and International for Findmypast said:

“We are very proud to be part of the 2016 conference of the National Genealogical Society. NGS plays a leadership role in our industry providing world class education and standards enabling many more people to learn more about their past. Having access to Findmypast as part of their membership ensures that NGS members have one of the best tools available to find their ancestors.”

2 Comments

“Released in partnership with FamilySearch International, the records contain more than 30 million names, nearly 1 million of which have never before been published online and can only be found at Findmypast.”

Can someone explain why all of these records will not also be available on FamilySearch? What does ‘partnership’ actually mean. In any case, the headline is misleading. At most 1 million records/names appear to be ‘new’…..or that 10 million refers to Findmypast only.

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Mary Dresser Taffet May 5, 2016 at 9:52 pm

Hooray! After searching for it for almost 20 years, I FINALLY found the marriage record for my paternal grandparents. They did actually in fact get married, legally! No wonder I couldn’t find it. They got married in Pennsylvania; I never knew they ever even lived there! I’d been looking in Virginia for many years and never found anything.

And as often as I search on my grandfather, I’d surely have seen it at Ancestry.com had it been available there.

Yes, he does still lie in this record (his birth year, his parents birthplaces, he said he’d never been married before), but there is an actual license and ceremony the same day! Thank you Findmypast!

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