Save, Organize, and Share Your Digital Photographs Forever

With a free account on Forever.com, you can edit, organize, store, and even (optionally) share your photos, videos, and more in the cloud. You can create and print photo books as well as convert your old media to new digital formats. With a paid account, your content will always be safe in your permanent digital home at Forever. All of this is possible because of the Forever Guarantee and the company’s easy-to-use web, mobile, and desktop apps.

forever-family-of-products

Actually, you can find a number of online services that will help you file, sort, organize, and save your digital photographs. What sets Forever apart from its competitors is the capability for a paid account to keep your precious memories protected for generations. Yes, the company promises to keep your items for your lifetime plus 100 years. To back up that claim, the company has a rather impressive plan to make sure your items remain available; their stated goal is to keep your content safe and available with the company’s patented vault technology.

In order to make sure your items last for at least your lifetime plus 100 years, Forever.com has created a Guaranteed Storage Plan. A large portion of your payment is deposited into the Forever Guarantee Fund. The money is invested so that it increases in value and pays for the recurring maintenance and preservation costs of your Guaranteed Storage, as well as the migration of your content to new digital formats, over time. This migration ensures that your descendants and other family members will be able to view your items for more than a century, even if the technology changes and new file and other formats replace today’s popular file formats.

The Forever Guarantee Fund Investment Policy may be found at https://www.forever.com/guarantee.

Forever offers many services. Of course, you can digitize your own photographs, sound recordings, videos, and more, and then upload the results to the Forever web site. However, the company also offers conversion services. You can send your old photographs, slides, albums, home videos, audio tapes — anything! Forever will digitize and store them online at Forever.com and also send you copies of your videos on DVDs. If you wish to do so, you can share your online items with anyone you wish and never worry again, thanks to the Forever Guarantee.

This service is not a “one trick pony.” Besides the online offerings, Forever will create and print personalized scrapbooks, photo books, calendars, cards, mugs and more. The company will make keepsakes and gifts with templates, backgrounds, and embellishments created by industry leading designers.

Forever provides legal protection of your content ownership and digital rights. This ensures that members’ ownership of content and privacy are protected during their lives, and that they can determine who will manage their accounts after their deaths, and how their information will be shared with future generations.

Forever provides an excellent method of preserving and making available your ancestral photos for more that 100 years. Is it a perfect guarantee? I doubt it, but it is a better plan than anything else I have seen so far.

While Forever.com does have a free option, that free option looks to me more like a “free trial period” for you to see how the service works. I suspect that most genealogists will evaluate the service and, if they decide to stay with it, will upgrade to a paid service:

A $5/month plan is ideal for young families that are just starting to make amazing memories. It provides 10 gigabytes of guaranteed storage space, enough for about 2,500 digital photographs.

A $10/month plan is designed for families who want to preserve their existing photos and memories. It provides 50 gigabytes of guaranteed storage space, enough for about 12,500 digital photographs.

A $15/month plan is designed for those who have been detailing their family history across generations. It provides 100 gigabytes of guaranteed storage space, enough for about 25,000 digital photographs.

Even more space is available for those who have very large collections. For instance, the $60/month plan probably will appeal to professional photographers and a few others who have collections of one terabyte (1,000 gigabytes) or more.

Prices are discounted 40% if you pay a one-time fee in advance. A one-time payment of $349 covers 10 gigabytes of storage, or about 2,500 photos. The Organizer package requires a one-time payment of $699 with 50 gigabytes of storage and capacity of about 12,500 photos. The Collector package has an upfront cost of $999 and provides 100 gigabytes of storage, enough for about 25,000 photos. Pricing details may be found at https://store.forever.com/pricing.

You can try Forever.com’s free trial before committing to purchase.

As stated on the Forever.com web site:

It’s Permanent.

  • Forever Guarantee – your memories are guaranteed to be preserved for your lifetime plus 100 years.
  • Pass your account on to future generations.
  • Long term file migration keeps your digital content accessible.
  • Full resolution saving means you can always print or reproduce your media.

It’s Private & Secure.

  • Your memories are triple backed up and encrypted.
  • You have complete control of the privacy of your account – always know who you’re sharing with or keep it totally private.
  • No data mining or advertising. Ever.
  • Permanent digital rights – you, and only you, own your content.

It’s Personal.

  • Our apps make it easy to get organized and creative with image editing, albums, tags and slideshows.
  • Your custom subdomain gives you a permanent personalized home on the web.
  • Unlimited uploading and downloading.
  • Use Forever on the web or enjoy on your iPhone, iPad and Android devices.

If you would like to keep your photographs, videos, sound recordings, and more available for your lifetime plus 100 years and to optionally make them available for others, check out Forever at https://www.forever.com.

4 Comments

According to the website, this program supports PDF files, so one could generate reports from one’s genealogy program to post for future generations along with the photos. I can see producing reports with sources to be filed in a main file with the reports and photos of individual family units as sub files.
Apparently it does not at this time accept gedcom files. If the service were to accept gedcoms, it could be updated (replaced) as corrections and/or new information is added to a master file without having to generate new PDFs each time. It would make the site more research friendly to future family genealogists (and don’t we all hope there will be at least one) and still be easy to navigate for someone who just wants to know who grandpa was. I’ve sent the suggestion to the company.

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Can you upload as tiff and have them stay tiffs. Many sites convert to jpg that takes up less room but is not archival.

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Not trying to be negative, but nothing is guaranteed forever. I just don’t know why you would want to pay a large or monthly fee when there are so many FREE sites out there like Flickr or Google Photos.

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I logged in for the free trial and I think it is not user friendly. I tried some of the tutorials and they were of no help; they showed what but not how. I called the help line and was put on hold for too long a time and hung up and deleted the icon from my desktop.
Lowell Ludford
ludford@comcast.net

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