New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Over 8.3 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:

Canada Census 1901

Findmypast_logoThe 1901 Canada Census is now available to search on Findmypast. Containing over 5.1 million records, the census was taken on 31st March 1901 when just under 9,000 enumerators and 35 commissioners were dispatched to record every household in the country. It was the first census to add questions on religion, birthplace, citizenship and period of immigration and covers 206 districts and 3,204 sub-districts.

For each result, you will be provided with a transcript that covers key details from the 1901 census and a link to the digital image of the original census form. The images, microfilmed in 1955, are held at the Library and Archives Canada website. Each record will reveal the name, date of birth, place of birth, marital status, relationship to head of household, race or tribe, immigration year and naturalization year of each household member. Images will often provide you with additional information, such as occupation and religion.

Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law 1916-1921

Over 48,000 additional records have been added to our exclusive Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law 1916-1921 collection. The once classified records, digitised from original documents held by The National Archives in Kew, record the struggles of life under martial law in Ireland and contain the details of soldiers and civilians who participated in or were affected by the Easter Rising of April 1916.

Ireland Roman Catholic Parish Registers Browse

Our collections of Irish Roman Catholic parish baptisms, banns, marriages, burials and congregational records are now available to browse. Spanning over 200 years of Ireland’s history from 1671-1900, The Irish Catholic Parish Registers consist of over 300,000 images containing more than 40 million names from over 1,000 parishes. The records were released in association with the National Library of Ireland and cover 97% of the entire island of Ireland, both Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.

United States, Connecticut Town Vitals, The Barbour Collection Indexes

Connecticut Town Vitals contains over 1.6 million birth, marriage and death records. The collection consists of 55 volumes of vital records covering 137 towns across the state between the mid-1600s and mid-1800s and will allow you to uncover vital information about your Connecticut ancestors.

Ireland, Histories & Reference Guides

Containing over 1,000 records, Ireland, Histories & Reference Guides allows you to learn more about the history of your ancestral homeland. The collection consists of four fascinating 19th century Irish histories and reference guides; the Album of Ireland, A Little Tour of Ireland, Ireland in Pictures and The Tourist’s Picturesque Guide to Ireland. The various titles in this collection provide images of iconic landmarks in Ireland as well as descriptions of townlands and local people.

United States, Transatlantic Migration Indexes

The United States, Transatlantic Migration Indexes contain over 312,000 records. The collection consists of 46 assorted indexes that will allow you to find out if your ancestors crossed the Atlantic from England, Scotland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, or France between the late 1500s and early 1900s. The publications included in this collection may be able to provide you with vital information about your ancestors such as birth countries, when and where they emigrated, ages, occupations, and details regarding spouses and children.

United States, Early American Families Indexes

Explore 24 fascinating publications containing over 428,000 records. The publications in this collection contain vast amount of details regarding the early settlers of America and their descendants and will help enhance your research into the founding families of the United States. Many of these volumes include records and details from before 1776 and each result will include a transcript and an image of the original source material.

United States, Early American Vital Records Indexes

Containing over 179,000 records, the Early American Vital Records Indexes allow you to explore your connections to the early families of America. These records may reveal vital information about your ancestors in the United States and Barbados from the 1600s to the early 1900s. The collection includes 11 publications containing birth, marriage, and death registers, as well as publications detailing the military dead of the American Revolutionary War and their service.

Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law 1916-1921 Browse

Over 50,000 additional records have been added to the Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law 1916-1921 Browse. The Browse function allows you to select a specific piece of the collection and browse through each image of that volume.

2 Comments

The “United States, Transatlantic Migration Indexes” link above, points to “United States, Connecticut Town Vitals, The Barbour Collection Indexes” instead.

Like

    You are correct. It does go to the wrong address. I just checked on the copy of the announcement sent to me by Findmypast and I find the same error is there.

    I will report it to the folks at Findmypast.

    Thank you for pointing that out.

    – Dick Eastman

    Like

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