New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of November 21, 2016

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Summary

Maybe one of your ancestors is in one of the newly published 1916 Denmark census records, civil registrations from Hungary, Sweden church records, Ohio death, South Carolina birth, or Wyoming obituary records. Search these free records and more at  FamilySearch.org by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection

Indexed
Records

Digital
Images

Comments

Denmark Census 1916

2,964,499

584,642

New indexed records and images collection

Hungary Civil Registration 1895-1980

114,567

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden Västerbotten Church Records 1619-1896; index 1688-1860

36,337

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

South Carolina Delayed Birth Certificates 1766-1900

0

82,604

New browsable image collection.

Ohio County Death Records 1840-2001

0

98,622

Added images to an existing collection

Wyoming Star Valley Independent Obituaries 1901-2015

21,394

1,850

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

About FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

3 Comments

This work is so exciting, really. I’m one of the ones who’s been involved in helping to get records easily searchable in FamilySearch. I did Ukrainian BMD records for a couple of areas for about ten years awhile back, and now am indexing French ones of the 1800s, mostly: censuses from a couple of areas (Toulousse and a region between two rivers northeast of Paris). Although I have a working reading knowledge of basic French, it’s only a second language to me; I only take the beginning-level records so far. What is needed is first-language French-speaking adjudicators to check all the work so it can be uploaded for searchability. The Ukrainian ones have been there for some time. Very rewarding to see.

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whatever happend to RAOGK I need some grave photos from the Nederlands and Germany

Like

    RAOGK is back online, but most folks do no know it. Have you tried find-a-grave or billiongraves? I do not know if there is a German genweb or not and do not know about the Netherlands either.
    Margaret

    Like

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