Beware of the Transparency Market Research Report Now Available: “Genealogy Products and Services Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2016 – 2024”

It is difficult to measure the size of the genealogy marketplace. Obviously, genealogists spend millions of dollars every year, but nobody seems to know how many millions. Now Transparency Market Research (TMR) has issued a report claiming to measure the marketplace. However, a quick glance at the company’s announcement of the report raises more questions than it answers.

TMR states that the report, titled Genealogy Products and Services Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2016 – 2024, offers a comprehensive overview of the genealogy market. It focuses on the growth of the global genealogy products and services market across various geographical and application segments and the factors influencing it. The description goes on and on describing the “genealogy products and services market.” However, the description of the report seems to focus mostly on DNA testing and then gives some passing remarks about traditional (non-DNA) genealogy research, such as looking at original records on paper, microfilm, or computer screens.

The announcement of the report states:

“Rapidly increasing interest towards genealogy is the primary driver of the global genealogy products and services market. Various studies suggest that nearly 95,000 new tests for genealogy are performed every year worldwide. The adoption of genealogy products and services is higher in western countries. However, the increasing adoption in developing countries is opening new avenues for service providers. Moreover, linking several genealogical services with social media such as Google plus and Facebook is likely to generate increased consumer interest towards genealogy testing. Furthermore, the continuous innovations in technology are equipping genealogy consumers with advanced tools for genealogical research. This factor is propelling the growth of the global market.

“On the flip side, the most common concerns about genealogy products and services are regarding their cost and privacy. A genealogy test user has to spend as much as US$18,000 in a year to trace their family history or family tree. Moreover, several companies retain results and samples for their own use without any privacy agreement signed with subjects.”

“Tests for genealogy?” Genealogists performed genealogy research for years without ever having a “test.” The only “testing” for genealogy I know of has been a new development in the past few years, testing of DNA. Even so, that is only a subset of the genealogy marketplace.

The announcement also states: “Some of the key players in the global genealogy products and services market are Ancestry.com, DNAPrint Genomics Inc., Family History Library, Familybuilder, Family Tree DNA, Genealogy.com, MyFamily.com, RootsWeb.com, Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation, and WorldVitalRecords.”

Note the words “key players.”

The list seems odd as:

DNAPrint Genomics Inc. is a small company that most genealogists never heard of.

Familybuilder was a little-known software app, not a genealogy service, and its web site at http://livefamily.com/ appears to be offline. I believe it went offline several years ago although I cannot find the date right now.

Genealogy.com has not been an independent company for 13 years, having been bought out by and merged into Ancestry.com in 2003. In fact, the Genealogy.com web site at http://www.genealogy.com/ is no longer active, having been converted to a “read-only” website, according to the site’s home page.

MyFamily.com changed the company’s name to Ancestry.com several years ago but kept the old web site online for a while. The MyFamily.com web site was eventually shut down on September 30, 2014.

Rootsweb ceased to exist as an independent organization 16 years ago, having been acquired by  and merged into MyFamily.com (now known as Ancestry.com) in 2000.

Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation used to be in the genealogy DNA business but canceled its genealogy services several years ago and dropped out of the business. The assets of the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation were acquired by AncestryDNA in March 2012. The Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation web site continued for a while but was finally shut down in May, 2015.

WorldVitalRecords is no longer an independent company. Instead, it is now a subsidiary of MyHeritage. However, as a division of MyHeritage, it still publishes records of interest to genealogists.

So much for a report that “offers insights into the profiles of key players along with their business strategies.”

You can learn more about TMR’s Global Strategic Business report. Genealogy Products and Services Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2016 – 2024, at: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/genealogy-products-services-market.html.

You can also purchase your own copy of the report for “only” $5,216. No, that is not a misprint. They are selling this “comprehensive overview of the market” for five thousand two hundred sixteen American dollars.

Based on the errors and questionable statements in the report’s announcement, I am not recommending anyone purchase this report offering a “comprehensive overview of the market” when, in fact, many of the so-called “key players in the global genealogy products and services market” as listed in the report’s announcement have been defunct for years. Didn’t the authors of this “report” even check the web sites of the companies they listed as “key players in the global genealogy products and services market”?

Apparently not.

I would think that the authors of a “report” that has the words “2016 – 2024” in the title would have at least checked each company’s web page to see if each company was still in business.

You can see the announcement for the “report” for yourself at: http://www.medgadget.com/2016/12/genealogy-products-and-services-market-increasing-number-of-social-media-users-to-play-crucial-role-in-driving-demand-for-genealogy-products-and-services.html and at: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/genealogy-products-services-market.html.

14 Comments

Thanks for sharing and analysis – who’d even this of paying over $5000 for a report?

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Sounds like a scam to me. Bet you don’t even get a report for the $5000+.

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I have noticed articles in the WSJ have referred to TMR. Makes me question whether I want to renew my subscription to WSJ. I’d like to see what the WSJ would write on the genealogy market if they used this report.

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Wasn’t the Wall Street Journal bought by Fox News or it’s parent company?

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Market research about the industry I retired from always had serious errors like these. We used to laugh at how bad they were.

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What Were They Thinking?
I have a comment for every line in their report! $18,000? A year? Really? If that were released on April 1st it would have been enjoyable.

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When I saw this article, I was hoping someone had put the full report online and you were going to link to it! Dah! I have seen this report advertised in previous years. In the right hands it can be successfully used to grow a genealogy business.

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    After reading what Mr. Eastman posted and commented I don’t see how the report could be used to grow a genealogy business. You need accurate information to make business plans. Obviously this is not accurate and I doubt the $5000 report would be much more accurate.

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Worrying if people believe this. There are enough people out there already who think professional genealogists and genealogy companies are out to rip them off.

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This is a classic boilerplate release from the market research industry trying to drum up interest in funding a market background report. Typically, a (to borrow your words, Dick, which are both convenient and accurate) “…a small company that most genealogists never heard of…” wants to drum up some growth capital so they go to a company offering to partially fund some research into the potential market. Feel free to change the word, genealogists, to suit the discipline. Odds are there are a few more companies who’ll cough up five grand apiece to maybe get a few nice PR paragraphs on the amazing growth potential that will (coincidentally) boost their fortunes as well. If enough sign up and pay, the sponsoring company will actually start the research, and in 6 months or so issue “advance copies” to the sponsors. 6-6 months later the research itself will be excerpted with some good quotes send out to trade and financial media. Then the report will go on sale for $10G – $20G. It will be of questionable provenance and use, but it’ll make some folks some money. These come out probably every day.

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The only positive thing I can see is that any business person dim enough to spend $5K + on this report won’t be cluttering up the genealogy market for too long. Thanks Dick for an insightful analysis as always.

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Looking at their contact page, locations are in Albany New York and Salt Lake INDIA….

Liked by 1 person

    I am told if you call their Customer Service department to order a report or to ask questions, you get connected to person with a very strong Indian accent who seems to know nothing about the report but is very willing to take your order.

    Disclaimer: That is what another newsletter reader told me after calling the number to complain. I haven’t tried it myself.

    Like

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