New Historic Records on FamilySearch, Week of December 12, 2016

FamilySearch_LogoThe following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Major additions have been made to record collections in Ireland as well as the Find A Grave index. New indexed records were also added to the Freedmen’s Bureau collection. Search these free records and more from seven other countries at FamilySearch.org by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection

Indexed
Records

Digital
Images

Comments

Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980

31,732

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

England Devon Bishop’s Transcripts 1558-1887

34,105

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Germany Schleswig-Holstein Kreis Schleswig Civil Registration 1874-1983

29,383

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Ireland Valuation Office Books 1831-1856

1,781,373

183,144

New indexed
records and images collection

Namibia Dutch Reformed Church Records 1956-1984

1,044

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Find A Grave Index

2,145,457

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Peru Puno Civil Registration 1890-2005

127,712

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

California Cemetery Transcriptions 1850-1960

105,227

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Iowa Grand Army of the Republic Membership Records 1861-1949

614

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Arkansas Church Marriages 1860-1976

0

885

Added images
to an existing collection

United States Freedmen’s Bureau Records of Freedmen 1865-1872

102,085

30,274

New indexed
records and images collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

7 Comments

Regarding the Ireland Valuation Books, I found an ancestor using Familysearch.org search process. But it won’t let me view the image. I get a message saying I would either have to be at one of their family history centers or “signed-in members of supporting organizations.” I’m signed into Familysearch.org, but can’t see the image. They don’t say what the “supporting organizations” are… anyone have any idea?

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    The source of this film has restrictions related to access. You can view this image at a Family History Center near you. It might be necessary for a church member to sign in to allow you access. A signed in member of a supporting organization is likely the source.

    Like

    You should e-mail Family Search and ask you question. I have never encountered the problem you mentioned on that site. But I have not looked into the Irish Valuation Books. Maybe they are allowed only to show the transcription.

    Like

    This site indicates the images are available for free, forever, from FindMyPast. One must create a username and password.
    https://goo.gl/0cVeUp
    Carolyn

    Like

I was signed in with my username and password, but image was still blocked. Contacted the website and they said to go to the family history center. So apparently LDS is blocking access to some images unless you go to their place. That doesn’t seem to fit the spirit of familysearch.org.

Like

    —> That doesn’t seem to fit the spirit of familysearch.org.

    It is done because of contractual restrictions imposed by the other sites. Some web sites give permission to FamilySearch.org to republish all their images, while other web site owners prefer that the user must visit the second web site directly (which often requires a paid subscription). All that is under control of the contract signed by FamilySearch and the owner(s) of the other web site(s).

    I believe that, in all cases, you CAN view the images if you are using the computers at a FamilySearch location, such as at the FamilySearch Library in Salt Lake City or at a local Family Search Center near you. Again, all that is controlled by the contract between FamilySearch and the web site(s) that has the images.

    All this is explained at https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Restrictions_for_Viewing_Images_in_FamilySearch_Historical_Record_Collections

    Like

    A very kind woman from familysearch.org called me to explain exactly what you explained. She told me the records are from the National Archives of Ireland. (Wish they had put that on their website to explain…). I found the image I wanted for free on the National Archives website. I’m glad someone from Familysearch.org was able to provide the needed information, but it would have been simpler if instead of just blocking the image they provided the information on where it can be found.

    Like

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