North Carolina Lawmakers Renege On Deal To Repeal Hb2 ‘In Full’

This is a follow-up to an article I posted two days ago, Incoming North Carolina Governor Vows Repeal of Controversial LGBT Law, Thereby Avoiding Controversy over the National Genealogical Society’s Annual Conference. That article is available at: https://goo.gl/tDMYab. It seems that North Carolina lawmakers came up with a plan to repeal the anti-LGBT law HB2, as promised. The only problem with their plan is that it does not entirely repeal HB2.

It is a convoluted story. You can read the details in an article in The Washington Post at https://goo.gl/pccrej.

14 Comments

How is this related to genealogy?

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    —> How is this related to genealogy?

    Many companies and organizations are canceling events that were scheduled to be held in North Carolina because of the controversial law that discriminates against LGBTQ citizens and visitors to the state. (LGBTQ stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (and/or questioning) individuals/identities.) Those canceling include the NCAA men’s basketball tournament games, the Atlantic Coast Conference football game, concerts by Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, Cyndi Lauper, Ringo Starr, Boston, Duran Duran, shows by Cirque du Soleil, the conference of the Community Transportation Association of America (1,000 attendees were expected), the Southern Sociological Society, and more.

    Also, several companies have canceled plans to expand in North Carolina because of concerns about how their employees would be treated.

    See my earlier article at https://blog.eogn.com/2016/09/22/north-carolinas-anti-lgbtq-law-will-cost-the-state-more-than-395-million-and-even-affects-genealogy-conferences/ for further details.

    The National Genealogical Conference scheduled to be held in Raleigh, North Carolina WILL be held as scheduled in 2017 but the organizers have advised “The [National Genealogical Society’s] Board respects the individual right of every NGS member to act as he or she deems proper with regard to the North Carolina law or to attending or speaking at the 2017 conference.” See http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/pressroom/ngs_concern for the complete statement.

    A number of NGS members have decided to not attend the 2017 NGS conference because of concerns about discrimination.

    As such, the legislative actions have a direct bearing on the second-largest genealogy event to be held in North America: the NGS conference scheduled to be held in Raleigh, North Carolina. This event typically draws 1,500 to 1,800 genealogists most years although attendance probably will be down this year because of this controversy.

    Since this controversy has a direct impact on the second-largest genealogy event to be held in North America, it is a genealogy-related issue.

    Liked by 1 person

Thanks again for the update. This is a neutral statement and no further political commentary will be coming from me on this string unless someone just cannot restrain themselves. I would hope others just take this as news of the reasons a meeting of genealogists has been effected….and leave it at that.

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I am disappointed. Like, Mary, my first question was “What does this have to do with genealogy?” While the original article was a neutral statement, your reply was a blatant political statement.

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    —> my first question was “What does this have to do with genealogy?”

    I wasn’t going to respond to every comment posted here but I do feel I need to answer this one.

    The controversy surrounding North Carolina’s HB2 legislation has a direct impact on genealogy because of the major genealogy conference scheduled to be held in North Carolina in a few months. Other organizations are canceling conferences in the state or otherwise boycotting North Carolina activities because of concerns over this legislation.

    I will strongly suggest that all genealogists who are thinking of attending any genealogy event in the state, especially a major genealogy conference, should evaluate all sides in this controversy and then decide for themselves what they should do.

    I am not concerned if any one person decides to attend or not attend. That is a decision for the individual. Instead, my hope is that you will at least think about the issues and then make your own decision.

    As the author of a genealogy newsletter and one who often writes about genealogy conferences worldwide, I hope I can make you think about the issues and then encourage you to make your own decision. If I succeed in making you think then I feel I have achieved my goal.

    The decision is yours to make.

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And there it is.
Actually, Bruce, it looked like a neutral statement of what happened.

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Thank you for taking the time to get current on the status of this controversy, and keep your readers informed of the event’s organizers’ options for attendees. Good reporting.

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In my world, all beings are interrelated, and consequently, have to do with everyone and everything else. For myself, I do not live in boxes, I live in an imperfect world full of differences. I try to follow the example of my gr-gr-gr grandfather, a man of quiet conscience and sterling example. This morning I am reminded of a passage from Matthew, I believe, to the effect that “what you have done to the least of these my brethren, you have done it unto me.” I choose my reactions. I choose not to perpetrate policies that are hurtful. I choose…

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I’m with Betsy. If State legislators choose to maintain their position that certain members of our families are less than fully human, then I choose to boycott this event as well as any other in the state of North Carolina.

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Nancy Elizabeth Thomas December 22, 2016 at 2:31 pm

Wow. I just hope my home state will get this idiocy over with so I can go to the genealogy conference and maybe the basketball tournaments I love. Genealogy is about the path of all our ancestors and we need to learn from the discrimination present in their pasts and stop new ones now.
Nancy Thomas
North Carolina

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I’ve made my decision, after reading this discussion and the following post by another genealogy blogger, Thomas MacEntee:
http://www.geneabloggers.com/shoot-gays-dont-genealogy-diversity/
Mr. MacEntee answers the question of whether this discussion is political. It is not. It’s a question of civil rights. In the spirit of his post, I ask you to replace LGBT with ‘black’ or ‘Jewish’ in this discussion and read it once again. Mr. MacEntee fears for his safety in attending a conference in a state that sanctions discrimination against people like him. In the new world we are entering on January 20, this fear is entirely justified.
For me this is very much a question of genealogy, as I have an uncle who was one of the first 100 people in the world to die of AIDS. It is in his honor that I sadly will not be attending NGS17.

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    It is a disservice to the Jewish people and Black people to equate ethnicity and race with LGBT issues. There is no comparison at all.
    Unfortunately the LGBT agenda has been promoted in such a manner that anyone who conscientiously opposes their objectives is demeaned and considered a bigot. Not so, as we all have a right to our own convictions about such matters.

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Oh, dear. Oh dear. This whole controversy makes me wonder what on earth our ancestors did about such problems before the advent of indoor plumbing and modern segregated toilet facilities. Did they have and hers outhouses and garderobes, or did they just make do with unisex facilities? Judging from the genealogical record, whatever they did doesn’t seem to have done any damage to family life and the moral fabric of society.

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