668,000 Pittsburgh, PA Cemetery Records Now Online

Including neighboring communities throughout the Allegheny County area.

San Diego, CA, January 21, 2017– Interment.net, an online cemetery records archive serving genealogists since 1997, recently added over 668,000 records from 29 cemeteries located in the greater Pittsburgh, PA area. These records have dates of death from the 1750s to present day.

The public is welcome to browse them by visiting: http://www.interment.net/us/pa/allegheny.htm

These records cover the cemeteries of the Pittsburgh Catholic Diocese, the National Cemetery of the Alleghenies, the African American Military Cemetery, Allegheny Cemetery, Homewood Cemetery, and several others in the communities of McKeesport, Versailles, Bridgeville, Elizabeth, and Bethel Park.

During the America’s industrial revolution of the 1800s, the steel mills of Pittsburgh attracted a diverse group of ethnicities, including Italians, Poles, Irish, African Americans, Germans, Greeks, and Dutch. Thus, these cemetery records are a valuable resource to many genealogists.

Records for most of these cemeteries were acquired directly from the cemeteries themselves, already in digital format. Records for other cemeteries were transcribed from tombstone inscriptions.

Genealogists can expect to find dates of birth, death, burial, and plot locations, as well as brief histories of each cemetery.

Since 1997, Interment.net has assembled an archive of cemetery records that covers cemeteries across the globe. With millions of records now searchable, Interment.net is a free service supported by sponsors.

7 Comments

Another source to supplement Find A Grave and while no longer updated, Norm’s List, found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~njm1/index.html

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Most, but not all, of the Jewish burials in the Pittsburgh area can be found – courtesy of the Rauh Jewish Archives (at the Heinz) – at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/cemeteries/

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Many of these cemeteries have records posted on their own websites and may have more information than what’s on interment.net. Google the cemetery name to find its website. The Catholic Cemeteries Association has set up websites for cemetery records in various dioceses, including Pittsburgh (www.ccapgh.org/search-burial-records.asp).

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    I totally agree with you L Nelson. I also, like to go directly to the cemeteries websites – they do have more information and I use the Catholic Cemeteries Association website.

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Not sure if I was using it correctly; but when I clicked on the hyperlink in your article it took me, alternatively, to Genealogy Bank or MyHeritage?

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    —> when I clicked on the hyperlink in your article it took me, alternatively, to Genealogy Bank or MyHeritage?

    I believe it took you to Interment.net. That is the way it is supposed to work. I just tested it and the link took me to Interment.net.. The announcement was written by Interment.net and describes the company’s listings of cemetery records from the Pittsburgh area.

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Dick,
During the America’s industrial revolution of the 1800s, the steel mills of Pittsburgh attracted a diverse group of ethnicities, including Italians, Poles, Irish, African Americans, Germans, Greeks, and Dutch.

Don’t forget us Serbs!
Denise

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