Announcing a New Consistency Checker for Online Family Trees at MyHeritage

What errors are in your genealogy database? Most people have several and are not aware of the errors. A new Consistency Checker for online family trees at MyHeritage scans your family tree and identifies potential mistakes and inconsistencies in your data so that you can quickly make the necessary changes in your tree, improving its overall quality and accuracy.

pr_consistency_checker

I ran this on my database and am a bit embarrassed to admit it found two errors.

In addition, the Consistency Checker identified several possible problems, such as people who had children at a rather young, but possible, age or at an advanced, but possible, age. In other words, it displayed a notice that “you might want to double-check this.” Luckily, in my case they were all legitimate facts as many of my French-Canadian ancestors did have children while in their mid-teens. However, it never hurts to double-check your sources.

Besides, I love the graphic used for the Consistency Checker of the man with a monocle. “I’m checking on you.”

More information about the Consistency Checker for online family trees may be found in the MyHeritage blog post at: https://goo.gl/7IWeIk.

5 Comments

Dick,
I use RootsMagic, which I like a lot. But I wish it had a similar “fact checker.” I know, for instance, about a problem with a family that is spelled two different ways. I’m not quite sure how to deal with that. Waggoner is an issue too, as the immigrant is Wagner, and his son sometimes used Wagner, sometimes Waggoner, even in the same document.

One of my ggg grandmothers had her last child in her early 60s. I’ve seen this happen in other cases, too, with women who have a child every year or two and then finally it’s a span of three, or four before they peter out. I seem to have pretty good proof, too, with baptismal records.

Doris

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    —> I use RootsMagic, which I like a lot. But I wish it had a similar “fact checker.”

    RootsMagic has a “fact checker” although it is called a “Problem Search.” It is a method of searching your genealogy database looking for obvious problems, including mothers giving birth at thirteen years of age or younger, birth after a mother’s death, people who lived to be more than 110 years old, people entered without being listed as male or female, fathers aged 70 or above when a child is born, and similar problems.

    For more information, look at: http://blog.rootsmagic.com/?p=1737

    Like

    As Dick E. explained, RootsMagic shows Problems. They are designated by a red triangle with a black explanation mark inside at the right hand edge of the name banner between the yellow light bulb and blue FamilySearch Tool symbol. The triangle looks like what might be on a road when there is car trouble ahead.

    Like

A potentially great feature but making corrections to relationships, dates etc is very difficult to do in FH. As an example I cannot add another spouse with more children to a man without deleting his first wife – have a death date but it still will not let me correct a relationship – therefore the consistency report is telling me a daughter was born to her mother (second wife) when the mother was 8 yo when if fact she is the daughter of a first wife – I can easily make these corrections in ancestry.

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    —> A potentially great feature but making corrections to relationships, dates etc is very difficult to do in FH. As an example I cannot add another spouse with more children to a man without deleting his first wife

    When you wrote, “FH,” were you referring to MyHeritage or to a different genealogy program? If you were referring to MyHeritage, I think you are missing something. I have several ancestors who had multiple wives in their lives and also had children by each of the wives. One ancestor had 4 wives and had children by 3 of them. MyHeritage handles that information easily, showing all the wives and also all the children, correctly aligned with each mother and the father.

    Like

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