New Historic Records On FamilySearch: Week of March 6, 2017

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Summary

This week’s update brings good news for everyone with French heritage. Over half a million France 1876 census records have been added to FamilySearch’s database. Search new free records from British Columbia, The United Kingdom, France, Ghana, The Netherlands, Spain, Maine and Texas, and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection

Indexed
Records

Digital
Images

Comments

British Columbia, Victoria Times Birth, Marriage and Death
Notices, 1901-1939

54,330

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537-1918

7,536

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

France, Saone-et-Loire, Census, 1876

594,235

13,310

Added images
to an existing collection

Ghana, Accra, Marriages, 1863-2003

0

10,644

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records

185,088

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

BillionGraves Index

161,343

161,343

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Spain, Soldier Personal Service Files, 1835-1940

5,090

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

United Kingdom, Royal Hospital Chelsea: Discharge Documents of Pensioners 1760-1887 (WO 122)

1,710

2,218

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

United States, YMCA World War I Service Cards, 1917-1919

27,352

0

Added indexed
records to an existing collection

Maine, United States Naturalization Records, 1918-1991

0

29,001

Added images
to an existing collection

Texas, Matagorda County, School Census Records, 1923-1945

0

7,316

New indexed
records and images collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.
About FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

2 Comments

Hi

Might Dick or someone have advice on the best on line or cloud back up service? I ve nearly lost priceless records when both the computer and back up drive crashed. I m willing to pay to keep my records safe.

Like

    —> Might Dick or someone have advice on the best on line or cloud back up service

    There are dozens of online backup services to choose from and they vary widely in their capabilities. Also, we would need to compare your needs against the capabilities of each such service. Therefore, it is difficult to claim that any one service is “the best for everyone.”

    A true backup service will completely reformat and restore a hard drive after a crash. It will restore hidden files, boot records, the operating system, system files, and all applications. Very few services will do that. For that purpose, I use Arq (available for both Windows and Macintosh) although I also hear good things about Cloudberry. I haven’t used Cloudberry as I am quite happy with Arq and haven’t had any reason to experiment with others. However, I know that some others speak highly of Cloudberry.

    In addition, there are dozens of simple file storage services. They won’t back up hidden files, boot records, the operating system, system files, or applications. Instead, they are designed to simply save copies of your data files. For many people, that is sufficient. Such services include Dropbox, Google Drive, iCloud, SugarSync, OneDrive, SpiderOak, Box, and a bunch of others. To my knowlege, all of them are equally good.

    If you are concerned about privacy and security, you will want to use one of the services that encrypts all your data inside your computer BEFORE SENDING IT TO THE ONLINE SERVICE. Only encrypted data is stored on the service. Even the employees of the file storage service cannot read your data. Even if a government agency obtains a court order demanding th file storage service turn over your files to the government (that happens thousands of times every year), the services that only have encrypted files will be unable to do so. I also like services that are located in countries where personal privacy is protected by laws. Even governments are not allowed to see your personal data files. I suggest everyone should use encrypted file storage services even if you think you have nothing to hide.

    Some of the encrypted file storage services include Arq (mentioned earlier), SpiderOak (also mentioned earlier), pCloud, Tresorit, Mega.co.nz, Wuala (which I have not used but I hear good things about it), Tresorit, Azure from Microsoft (encryption is an option, not automatic), and others.

    Even the above list is abbreviated; there are many more online file storage services to choose from. As you can see, they also vary widely in services provided. In many cases, comparing them side-by-side is similar to comparing apples and oranges. You need to first decide what criteria is important TO YOU and then pick from the services that provide those services.

    In my case, I care a lot about privacy and security so I only use services that encrypt my data before sending it to the online service. However, encryption is not important to everyone. I think it should be important to everyone but I find many people don’t seem to care.

    Like

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