Findmypast Grant Five Days of Free Access to All Irish Records in Celebration of St Patrick’s Day 2017

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

  • Findmypast makes entire collection of more than 116 million Irish records free for five days
  • All 116 records free from the 13th to the 17th March 2017Leading family history website,

Findmypast, has just announced that they will be making their entire collection of Irish records free for five days to help budding genealogists uncover their Irish heritage ahead of St Patrick’s Day 2017.From today, Monday 13th March, until 11.59pm (GMT) Friday 17th March, all 116 million records within Findmypast’s Irish collection will be completely free to search and explore, providing family historians from around the globe with the opportunity to learn more about the lives of their Irish ancestors.

This includes free access to;

  • Over 10 million Irish Catholic Parish Registers
  • Over 15 million Census, Land & Substitute records including the 1901 and 1911 censuses
  • Over 30 million detailed Court & Prison Records
  • Over 33 million Irish newspaper articles spanning the years 1708 to 1956
  • Over 7.3 million Dog Licences
  • Over 24 million Irish Passenger Lists
  • Over 2.4 million workhouse & poor law records
  • Over1.4 million Irish Quaker records
  • Over 350,000 records from World War 1, the Easter Rising & more
  • Landed Estates Court records featuring details of over 500,000 tenants residing on estates all over Ireland
  • The complete Griffith’s Valuation
  • Over 2.3 million Social History & Directory Records, including the most comprehensive online collection of national directories, dating back to 1814
  • Indexes to Irish wills dating from 1270 – 1858

Free Live Webinar

On Thursday March 16th at 4pm GMT, Findmypast will be hosting a free St Patrick’s Day Webinar presented by Fiona Fitzsimons, the founder and research director of Eneclann, a Trinity College Campus Company. Fiona manages teams of expert researchers to provide Irish and British family history as well as running a successful probate genealogy service. Her talk, entitled, “Secrets to Successful Irish Family Research”, will cover strategies for online research, Irish customs & traditions and collateral records to help “bridge the gaps”.

New Records Available To Search

Thousands of additional records will be added to Findmypast’s extensive Irish collection on Friday 17th March. This will include substantial updates to their collection of Irish Society of Friends (Quaker) records, new directories, administrations, family histories, memorial inscriptions and more. Visit the dedicated Findmypast Friday page to keep up to date with the latest additions.

Learn more at: http://www.findmypast.com/

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

2 Comments

Thanks as always Dick! I was able to find a few new items today, despite the main search field not seeming to work for very common Irish surnames, though it returned *1* result for “Smith” as a test.

I had to expand and search the relevant Irish collections one by one over the course of 9 pages to get actual results, which was way too much work and I probably missed things.

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Dick have you ever noticed that getting any returns for Northern Ireland is practically nil, and in addition, all my Irish ancestors came in the 1700s, so my results every time they offer that is zero. I do the search in a multiple of ways, but it is always the same. Any ideas?

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