The JGSGB Will be Moving to a New Home in London

The following announcement was written by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain (JGSGB):

The JGSGB will be moving to a new home.

JGSGB has reached agreement with the Society of Genealogists for its library to be have a new home in SoG’s premises at Charterhouse Buildings, London EC1M 7BA. The JGSGB Library will remain a separate entity and will have its own space in the building. The Library will continue to be staffed by volunteers from the JGSGB and will continue to open to JGSGB members and visitors.

The Library will normally be open on the first Friday and third Sunday of each month from Friday 5th May 2017. Details can be found on the Society’s website at www.jgsgb.org.uk.

Leigh Dworkin, the Chairman of the JGSGB, said “This is a wonderful development for the Society and will guarantee the long-term future of our Library and its independence. We hope also that working more closely with the Society of Genealogists will bring benefits to the members of both Societies as our work is complementary.”

June Perrin, Chief Executive of SoG said “we are delighted to host the JGSB whose library and collections will greatly complement our own Jewish holdings. Together both Societies will provide an exciting resource for the genealogical community.”

Background

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain (JGSGB) was founded in 1992 to encourage research into the genealogy of the United Kingdom’s Jewish community; to promote the preservation of Jewish genealogical records and resources; and to share information amongst members.

JGSGB is an entirely secular organisation – a society for Jewish genealogy, not a Jewish society for genealogy.
The Society organises conferences, seminars and workshops; provides email and social media discussion forums; promotes distance learning; publishes an award-winning journal and a members’ newsletter; commissions and publishes genealogical guidebooks; and provides a general enquiries service.

Its activities and facilities, are open to the general public (except where noted) as well as to members.
The JGSGB Library is a small specialist library and is unique in the UK. From the start it has served the niche market of concentrating specifically on Jewish genealogy with the emphasis on resources to help those tracing Jewish ancestry. The library is the Society’s major asset and contains more than a thousand books and other items such as journals, pedigrees and manuscripts.

The library opened in 1997. For the first nine years it was housed at Finchley Synagogue in north London and in 1996 moved to West London Synagogue in central London where it remained for ten years.

The geographical coverage of the material held seeks to be worldwide. There is special emphasis on London and provincial UK communities but also much on other parts of the world, particularly eastern Europe, reflecting the diversity of Jewish settlement. There is an extensive collection of family trees and more general items to aid research such as surname dictionaries, gazetteers of place names and research guides. There is also a collection relating to the Holocaust. Much of the material has been privately published and is not widely available elsewhere.

The library is generally open twice a month and may be used by members of the Society and non-members. All are welcome from absolute beginners to more experienced genealogists. A team of volunteers from the Society is always on hand to offer help and guidance to visitors.

A smaller library is held by the Society’s flourishing branch in Manchester.

The Society of Genealogists (SoG) was founded in 1911 and is Britain’s National Family History Centre. The Society maintains a splendid genealogical library and education centre in Clerkenwell which is open to SoG members and day searchers on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

The Society’s collections are particularly valuable for research before the start of civil registration of births marriages and deaths (in 1837 in England and Wales) but there is plenty for the beginner too, with free onsite access to major genealogy databases and websites.

The Society has many unique manuscript research notes and collections about families and surnames, along with printed and unpublished family histories and pedigrees. Its library contains Britain’s largest collection of parish register copies and many nonconformist registers, along with local histories, copies of churchyard gravestone inscriptions, poll books, trade directories, census indexes and a wealth of information about the communities where our ancestors lived.

Many of the Society’s unique indexes are now online including Boyd’s Marriage Index with more than 7 million names, indexes of wills and marriage licences, apprentices and masters (1710-1811), Boyd’s Inhabitants of London as well as records such as the Bank of England will abstracts, Trinity House petitions and information on Teachers and Civil Servants. All the SoG’s pre 1840 printed Poll Books have been digitised and are online and members are creating an index database for them all.

With over 1500 datasets including approximately 13 million names, the online data exclusive to SoG members represents many of the Society’s unique collections. In addition to online indexes and finding aids the SoG Data Online includes PDFS of books from the library, family histories and many local sources. SoG Data is made available to SoG members as part of their annual subscription on its website www.sog.org.uk with selected datasets also made available with commercial partners Findmypast.

The Society of Genealogists holds regular study days, lectures and evening classes as well as distance learning courses for family historians. A diary of events and booking forms are available from the Society on 020 7553 3290 or on the website www.sog.org.uk.

Annual Membership of the SoG is £54 per year (overseas membership is £36 plus a one-off joining fee of £10. Membership benefits and information about joining the Society can be found on its extensive website at www.sog.org.uk.

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