Dick Eastman and This Newsletter to Relocate to Iceland

April 1, 2017 – Reykjavík, Iceland – While on a trip to Reykjavík, Iceland, Dick Eastman was awestruck by the beauty and the stark contrasts of this island nation. Hot springs, geysers, and volcanos are visible at almost every turn of the road. Houses are heated by underground hot springs. Food is grown in greenhouses that are heated by the same hot springs. Use of fossil fuels is minimized in this energy-saving country.

Even better, the island is “heaven on earth” for genealogists. Iceland has everyone’s family tree, complete with original source citations, online and available for all the country’s citizens to see. In fact, there is even an Android app available to show each Icelandic citizen his or her genealogy, in most cases back to 874 AD.

Everyone in Iceland is related. Every member of the 300,000 population derives from the same family tree, according to genealogy website islendingabok.is.

The web site is the online version of Íslendingabók (“The Book of Icelanders”). Here one can find information about the families of about 720,000 individuals who were born in Iceland at some point in time. More than 95 percent of all Icelanders born since 1703, when the first national census was taken, are registered in the database, along with half of all Icelanders who have lived on the island from the settlement in 874 until 1703.

Dick Eastman said:

“I cannot even imagine the ease and the freedom of researching family trees in Iceland. Source citations are available for almost everyone going back centuries, in some cases even more than a millennium.

“I have spent frustrating year after year trying to find records of my own ancestors in the United States, often with limited success. I have decided to ‘retire’ and now focus only on genealogies in Iceland. I can do this from my rocking chair on the front porch in Reykjavík during my semi-retirement.

“The standard of living in Iceland is very high, even when compared to European countries. The Icelandic weather may be a bit worse than Florida and other US states in the sun belt, but the other lifestyle factors more than make up for that minor drawback. The country respects privacy, both online and offline. That fits well with my other blog: www.PrivacyBlog.com, soon to become http://www.PrivacyBlog.is.

“And the lobsters in Iceland are great!”

The EOGN newsletter also will soon be moving to Iceland with a new web address: http://www.eogn.is

Look for it soon.

“Gæfa” (That’s Icelandic for “Good luck.”)

Disclaimer: Before sending messages of congratulations, please notice the date of this “announcement” as shown above. Yes, it is April first. Were you Fooled?

Actually, I really am spending April 1st in Reykjavík, Iceland, but I am just visiting here on vacation, not relocating.

37 Comments

Happy April Fool’s Day!
Actually, having it all so easily available would take the fun out of the chase, wouldn’t it?

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    And there I was thinking what a great place to be, visited there some years ago and loved the place, you caught me! Regards
    Maxine

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    I was thinking the same thing–you wouldn’t have the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat anymore . . .

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Yup, you got me…half awake sipping my first cup of coffee…

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You do this every year on April 1st and every year I fall for it! Good work. Ginny

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Yes, you fooled me! You made it seem so believable–even when you mentioned Icelandic lobster (you’re no longer a vegan?) Great April Fool’s Day joke, Dick!

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    —> (you’re no longer a vegan?)

    I am still a vegan. However, I found that Iceland isn’t the best place in the world for a vegan. The country is great, the landscapes have to be seen to be appreciated, but they don’t grow a lot of fruits and vegetables here. At a latitude of 66 degrees north for Reykjavík, there is a short growing season. Reykjavík is also the northernmost capital city in the world.

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Always the BEST POST of every year.

Liked by 1 person

Delbert Ritchhart April 1, 2017 at 10:30 am

Sounds inviting; but, no, didn’t fall for the April Fools. I saw it coming; but fun read!

Liked by 1 person

Send pictures! :-)))

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You would be an ‘Eastman-cicle’ sitting on the front porch in your rocker through the long winter! Fun post- enjoy your trip to the country that straddles 2 continental plates!

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The dream of every genealogist is to wake up as children of Icelandic parents.

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I read an article recently that people in Iceland who are dating and planning to get married use the Android App to see how closely they are in fact related before they get married.

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I fell…hook, line and sinker!

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Take off the horned helmet and you may be forgiven. Real Vikings never wore horned helmets (I know it’s a joke nowadays, but the horned helmets still irk me). While you’re visiting, be sure to find out about the Icelandic horses with five gaits. In videos the flying pace looks spectacular! There is a theory that the speed of the feet in the flying pace led to the legend that Sleipnir had eight legs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icelandic_horse

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You fooled me, too, the day after! Brilliant, Dick!

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I guess I’m the first, this year to get caught by your fun treat on April 2, 2017. But it still worked.
Thanks for another sample of your humor
Walter Kehoe from what will be Sunny Florida, after the sun rises this coming morning.

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    Enjoy the sunshine in Florida, Walter. I left Reykjavik this morning in a mixed rain an snowstorm with temperature at zero degrees Centigrade, 32 F. Great place to visit, however!

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Great April Fool joke Dick but knew you’d never leave Florida for Iceland. You can have that weather right here in Massachusetts 😎

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Yes, I believed it possible. When we visited Iceland, we thought we “would move there in a heartbeat.”

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Hi Dick,
Before you pack our bags, you may want to check out his genealogical breakthough reported yesterday: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10210180674646694&set=pcb.10155201369599510&type=3&theater
Fyrsti apríl!

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Patricia Stano-Carpenteer April 2, 2017 at 7:19 am

Got me! LOL Great picture!

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Fooled me. I sat up so I would not miss a word. My ancestors are both Irish and Scottish, living in Bermuda, mixed with Native ancestry. Totally fooled me. I knew I would be able to research my ancestry more.

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“MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA – April 1, 2016 – Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) announced today that the acquisition of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter (http://www.eogn.com) has closed, with Google acquiring eogn.com for an undisclosed 8-figure sum.”

So, has Google approved this sudden move to Iceland, or is Eastman having second thoughts about selling the Newsletter to Google?

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Eastman Online becomes Eastman on Ice, and, like the annual Ice Capades, returns annually with the same tired saga, derived from the same old family tree. No more DNA testing (why bother?!?), no more archive diving. Cousins everywhere. Beware of what you ask for!

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It would be idyllic, truly beautiful and the living is good – except for the very real threat of volcanoes! (no foolin’ about that)

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A close friend visited Iceland a couple of years ago and has told me about it in detail, so I thought you indeed had decided to move there. But, not being a native, your genealogical stats would not appear in their data banks. YOU GOT ME!

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Dick, you did not fool me this year. In some respects though, I thought April 1st came early this year, on November 8th 2016.

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Dick, I really did believe your “story”. However thanks for letting us see you in your “horned” helmet. Also watched the video of those verrrry interesting Icelandic horses, and to see them going so fast on the ice & snow!!!

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Charles Lundquist April 2, 2017 at 9:46 pm

Nice try, but I appreciate your humor (and all the insights into computers and genealogy!)

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Richard: You forgot to mention that everyone in Iceland speaks fluent English as a second language, that there are no income or sales taxes, and government employees shovel the snow out of you driveway – no charge. What more can you ask for.

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When i was there (1969), beer was illegal. They have since corrected that. When working for the (US) army, i volunteered for a detail to Keflavik Naval Air Station, but some body else got the nod. Hint: take a pass on the whale blubber.

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Well, if you are not relocating, I hope you at least learned that “Д is pronounced “th” and not like the English “D.” There is a straight “D” in Icelandic that is pronounced like the English “D.” We spared about this a few years ago, and I was a little offended when you didn’t believe me. My mother’s middle name was Aðalbjörg, and I very much know how to pronounce her name! I don’t mean to sound too snarky, but your response to my statement correcting what you thought some other Icelander had told you about the pronunciation of that letter in the Icelandic alphabet always struck me as just a tad arrogant.

Now on to other matters. I’m really glad that you got to see up close and personal the wonders of my maternal homeland. I have visited there now three times, and have become good friends with several third cousins. On our first trip we were taken to the farm where my grandmother was born. It is located north of Borgarnes, which is north of Reykjavík. The name of the farm is Hóll, which you can actually find on any decent map of Iceland. There was an old man who was at the farmhouse who remember when my grandparents came back for a visit in 1930 (and again in 1940). He said that my grandmother (we always called her, amma, the Icelandic word for grandmother) at first did not recognize anything, but then when she walked down to a small creek on the farm she said she remembered playing in that creek.

My grandparents were in Iceland in 1930 because my grandfather (afi, in Icelandic) was a U.S. representative to the 1000th anniversary of the Alþingi, or parliament. The big statue of Leifur Eiriksson in the capital city was a gift from the people of the United States to the people of Iceland commemorating that 1000th anniversary of the parliament. My Afi was active in GOP politics in Minnesota and was for awhile a state legislator and the state tax commissioner.

I hope that you were able to come home with as many wonderful scenic photographs as I was on my visits. It’s a magical place. I assume you saw a few elves during your visit! 😉

Sincerely,
Carl Jón Denbow, N8VZ
3rd cousin, 30 times removed of Leifur Eiriksson

P.S. The letter þ is also pronounced like the English “th.” My mother, whose first language was Icelandic because her grandmother lived in the home in Minneota, MN, and could not speak English, tried to explain to me once why these two letters were pronounced essentially the same way, but I never quite understood it.

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Icelandic is so close to Old English that Mom could read Beowulf in the original.

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You apparently don’t remember when we spared over the pronunciation of the Icelandic “ð” (lower case) and “Д (upper case). That’s OK.

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