Genealogist Discovers Man has been Using Dead Baby’s Identity for Decades

A Pennsylvania man has been using a dead person’s identity for more than 21 years. Authorities got involved after a relative of the deceased used Ancestry.com to put her family tree together. The woman was searching for family information on Ancestry last year and her nephew Nathan Laskoski popped up. She saw he got married and he moved around the country, from Texas, to Mississippi, to Tennessee and eventually to Pennsylvania.

But the problem is Laskoski died in 1972 when he was just two months old.

Authorities say 44-year-old Jon Vincent, back in 1996, escaped from a halfway house in Texas, went to a cemetery to find someone born around the same time he was.

Vincent’s successful acquisition of Laskoski’s Social Security number has allowed him to assume the identity of Laskoski, secure employment, obtain credit, open at least one bank account, obtain housing, obtain a professional license, and get married, all using the stolen identity,” according to court documents.

Vincent faces identity theft and social security fraud charges. If convicted he’s looking at fines of up to half-a-million dollars and a lot of time in jail.

13 Comments

And our Idiot Politicians want to close SSDI death records saying that is where all the I/D theft comes from, it is headstones but more often from giving information over Cordless or Cell phones anyone can get a scanner that will pickup these conversations so closing death records would not solve anything.

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In this case the SSDI has no record of Nathan Laskoski because he had not applied for a SS Card. There are far more ways to steal identity than any government can prevent. What they should be doing, is teaching all of us how to live honest, productive, contributing lives – by example as well as words.

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I’m sorry to be a contrarian, but I have to ask: a two month old child has no identity, save its name. What exactly was stolen and what harm was done IN THIS CASE? People change their names all the time. Do we accuse them of stealing? Rise up in righteous indignation and huff about morality? I don’t understand the rationale here, again, IN THIS CASE.

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    He didn’t legally change his name. He illegally assumed another person’s identity (probably used the dead kid’s birth certificate) and filed for a social security card based on that lie. He did this to evade authorities and hide his criminal record. His conviction was for indecency with a child, so some employers might have had a problem with that if they knew his real name. I doubt he’ll pay anything in fines, but he is looking at time for the fraud.

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    I agree. I’m a proud contrarian. Here was a guy who had become a productive member of society, had a professional license, paid taxes. He rehabilitated himself – did it outside the system.

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Nothing new here. In the novel ‘Day of the Jackal’ the assassin hired to kill de Gaulle did exactly that. More seriously, here in UK, the Met Police undercover officers assumed new identities in exactly the same way then infiltrated protest groups (usually anti govt groups), sometimes forming sexual relationships with members of those groups, to spy on them.

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Get real. The man was hiding his criminal past. How would you feel if he ended up, say, as the superintendent of your school district…or as one of your kid’s teachers. Or, say you were doing your family tree and found your granddad wasn’t who he said he was.

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Shirley Pizziferri April 13, 2017 at 12:57 pm

I agree with Jon Bayless. What’s becoming of us when we try to excuse someone who’s broken the law?

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The comments, so far, have focused on the purpose of our criminal justice system. Is the purpose to punish only? To rehabilitate only? Or some combination of the two? It seems that this man had already experienced the “punishing” aspect of our criminal justice system as he was in a halfway house, usually reserved for released prisoners as they attempt to re-enter society. We all are aware of the great amount of prejudice against those with criminal records with regard to housing, employment and other basic human activities in our society. I am not condoning his taking on the identity of a two-month old infant, but in doing so, he has lived as a productive citizen among us and contributed to the system, instead of taking from it through the revolving door of prison recidivism rates. Perhaps, we might have the compassion and mercy to see this man as having experienced the “rehabilitating” aspect of our criminal justice system.

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Never, ever can such deception be condoned. In the culture today too often we see the plea – oh he turned out OK so why punish? Blatant deception must be punished in a fair manner so that others don’t decide it’s OK and engage in similar deception and lying.

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The man was a child molester. I have no sympathy for him, under any identity. Who knows how many lives he has ruined?

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I just want to know if the woman is going to record this man as an AKA in her research.

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What is the eventual outcome in this case ?

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