William Deming Hornaday Photograph Collection is Now Online at the Texas State Archives

William Deming Hornaday (1868-1942) was a journalist and Director of Publicity for the University of Texas. He amassed a collection of about 5,800 items consisting of photographs, photographic postcards, photoengravings and negatives.

This photo of the Alamo is undated but the clothing styles of the people barely discernible in the picture provides some clues.

The images were created by a variety of photographers, the names of whom are mostly unknown. Dates covered are about 1890-about 1940, undated. The photographs depict notable people, places, and events across Texas. The collection also portrays a variety of locations outside the contiguous United States, most notably Mexico, Australia, China, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, Fiji, and Hawaii. Subjects covered include agriculture, bridges, cattle, cityscapes, dwellings, factories, harbors, hunting, hydraulic structures, irrigation farming, landscape, military bases and personnel, mineral industries, the petroleum industry, physical geography, politicians, public buildings, railroads, ranches, and the wool industry.

The images are arranged as received, under approximately 283 headings determined by subject matter, location, or format. These headings are ordered alphabetically.

You can access the collection at: http://bit.ly/2pHgqxX.

2 Comments

Hi, Dick — The picture of the Alamo appears to date from around the time Adina De Zavala, a granddaughter of Lorenzo De Zavala who had fought for Texas independence at the side of Sam Houston, was engaged in a historic preservation battle against developers who wanted to tear down parts of the historic site surrounding the Alamo for a commercial building project. She and her allies in the “Second Battle of the Alamo” would have looked much like the ladies depicted in the photo. Details can be found here:
http://www.history.com/news/the-second-battle-of-the-alamo
and here:
https://savingplaces.org/stories/the-woman-who-made-sure-we-remembered-the-alamo

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Thank you for this, Dick. The Hornaday name caught my eye, as my husband’s maternal grandmother is Nora Hornaday. In checking the book (The Hornadays, Root & Branch) given to us by his 92 yr. old cousin, we find that Nora is a 3rd cousin, once removed to William Deming Hornaday. More family information to check into and share with his siblings, cousins, and our children and grandchildren. Thanks again.

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