Ancestry, Inc. Announces Confidential Submission of Draft Registration Statement for Proposed Initial Public Offering

Genealogy website Ancestry.com Inc on Monday said it had confidentially submitted a draft registration statement on a proposed initial public offering (IPO) to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The company did not disclose the number of shares to be offered and the price range for the proposed offering.

Last May, Ancestry.com said in a statement that the company was valued at about $2.6 billion. We can probably assume today’s price is higher. However, the draft registration statement is confidential so today’s expected price is still not known.

Here is the official announcement from Ancestry, Inc. (which seems to be very brief):

LEHI, Utah, June 19, 2017 — Ancestry, Inc. today announced that it has confidentially submitted a draft registration statement on Form S-1 with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) relating to the proposed initial public offering of its common stock. The number of shares to be offered and the price range for the proposed offering have not yet been determined. The initial public offering is expected to commence after the SEC completes its review process, subject to market and other conditions.

7 Comments

Then they would be working in the interest of their shareholders rather than those who pay subscriptions for their data. Not sure if I like this or not. My data up for shareholders?

Like

    It could be a good thing. Prices could go down and they could also start to push to have more documents provided by the company and improve on the technology. Besides, Ancestry was already selling your data to other users.

    Like

Seems questionable with all the present issues on bring back a sync program. MacKiev has had a long delay with this and also has issues with tracking advance orders.

Like

Ancestry has always had shareholders and will in the future. The best we can hope is whatever shareholders are owners will continue to move the company in the best direction for the subscribers.

Liked by 1 person

Susan Laird North June 20, 2017 at 8:29 am

Years ago, I owned Ancestry stock until the company decided to take it private and took it all back. I seem to recall that occurred when it was bought by the British parent company and folded into their portfolio. I like the idea of owning stock in products I use and believe in. As a subscriber for over 15 years, it fits my investment strategy, however, as the saying goes, “once bitten twice shy. “

Like

I don’t think you can predict a lot about business strategy of the company by whether it is public or private. The main difference in a public company is that it is required to follow SEC regulations and has to disclose more about its financial situation and dealings.

Like

I’m really disgusted with the pricing for Ancestry. I’ve been a member since it started, you would think they would have some kind of a loyalty program. Their stock options is just another money grab.

Like

Leave a Reply

Name and email address are required. Your email address will not be published.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title="" rel=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <pre> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> 

%d bloggers like this: