Book Review: Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers
by Kevan M. Hansen.
Family Roots Publishing Co. 2016.
180 pages.

Luxembourg is one of the smallest countries in Western Europe, about the size of US Rhode Island or England’s county of Northamptonshire. There are three official languages: Luxembourgish, French, and German.

Luxembourg is comprised of three districts, which are further divided into twelve cantons. The Map Guide has a map of each district showing its constituent cantons (regions). Each canton has a map showing its constituent communes (municipalities), and each commune has a map with its constituent villages. The village names are all listed in the three national languages.

Catholicism was the major religion of the country. Each village is noted as to whether or not Catholic church records can be found for that village, what years are contained in those church records, and where the registers can be found today. Some villages have no Catholic records, which are so noted.

So why use this book? If you know the name of your ancestral village, or the region, you can use this book for guidance to finding the Catholic church records for that parish, or if they even exist. If you know the general area your ancestors came from, you could look at the maps and determine the possibilities of finding neighboring localities with relevant records.

There is additional information about the Luxembourg censuses, and other Luxembourg genealogy resources, both in print and online.

This map guide is no. 55 in a series of German parish map guides. For a complete list and descriptions of the sets, see http://www.familyrootspublishing.com.

Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers is available from the publisher, Family Roots Publishing Co., at http://bit.ly/2t7lQch.

One Comment

These Parish Map Guides are terrific! I have one for the Province of Sachsen (Saxony) to find the Lutheran parishes my German ancestors lived in.

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