A Short Note from Dick Eastman

You’ll notice there have been fewer articles than usual this past week. The reason is simple: I made a mistake.

I went to see my doctor for a quarterly check-up a few days ago. I should never have done that. During the visit, I complained that I was taking too many prescriptions for my diabetes and that they all seem to have undesirable side effects. She countered by giving me a new prescription in addition to all the others I have been taking. Stupid me. I had the new prescription filled and starting taking it as directed.

I spent the following three days in bed most of the time.

It is now five days since my doctor’s visit and the new prescription. I am now up and moving around but only at a slow speed. I only took the pills for two days; the day of the doctor’s visit and the following morning. I’ll let you guess what I did with the remaining pills in the prescription.

I thought medicine was supposed to make you feel better, not worse.

86 Comments

Here is hoping you will be in the pink very soon!

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Hope you are feeling better, sometimes the Doc’s do not know best. Take care.

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    Doctors are not trained to treat the cause of the symptoms, they can only treat the symptom.s It’s known that all meds have drawbacks that create other issues. Then the doc gives more meds which cause even more issues. It’s a snowball effect. I have found what works for me is eating healthy foods, using herbs,& essential oils. I feel the longer I stay away from doctors, the better off I am. Recently, the local paper of my hometown
    (a very small town ) ran a story stating it had the largest prescription writing doctors in the whole country. That is not a good thing especially for such a small area of this large country. I hope you are doing much better & can learn how to treat yourself for the most part.

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Sorry to hear this. I know what those side effects are. Hope you’re on the mend now.

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    Thank you for the wishes. I am feeling better now. Not 100% recovery just yet, but I suspect it will soon be 100% as long as I don’t take any more of those #@$%^&* pills!

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Sorry to hear…BUT, you are not alone…I’ve had similar situations and they are not fun! If you have a reliable pharmacist, have that person run compatibility checks on the meds that follow your dosing regimen. Doing that solved several of my problems…get better! MF

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    —> If you have a reliable pharmacist, have that person run compatibility checks on the meds that follow your dosing regimen.

    I wasn’t smart enough to do that. However, about 24 hours after taking the first pill I went online and searched for the name of the drug followed by the words “side effects.” What popped up on my screen was an exact description of what I had just hone through plus the words “frequent side effects.” I certainly would have been better off if I had asked questions or performed a search in advance!

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So sorry for you – I hope you feel back to your old self soon. Your blog is fantastic!

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    I have nothing but Side Effects on every Pill I pop, I have stopped reading them, If I need to know (for something New) My Pharmacy will tell me or I ask, My Pharmacy always does a yearly Check of Every Medication I am on – Not just my Diabeties Meds, because they want to know how many I have added during the Year and what I have dropped as well, so they either do an In Person review or over the Phone, sure it takes a little while, but I feel grateful that they keep track for me as well as with me. I am on quite a few Meds. Good Luck
    Cathy Roylance

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Glad at least you figured out very quickly what the problem was, but sorry it happened at all. Drugs have really bad sad effects so often.

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It’s actually been kinda nice not having more email that I feel I have to deal with, so you actually gave me a little ‘vacation’, haha. Hope you get better soon–don’t worry about us, but about your health!

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Sorry to hear that Dick. I was Dx T2D about 20 months ago. (Age 58) Did some research and decided to go on a low carb diet with intermittent fasting. (Eating in a 6 hr window.) My fasting glucose went from 315 to <100 in 17 days and I have had normal glucose ever since. I had to back off on the Janumet I was given because I was getting in the 50's. In a few months off the meds. A1c 11.3 to 5.1 now. Off a lot of other meds too. This diet often reverses multiple symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Like a new lease on life. Hope you feel better soon. John

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    —> This diet often reverses multiple symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Like a new lease on life.

    Someday I will write about my lifestyle change that occurred more than 4 years ago, although I probably won’t write about it in this newsletter. I converted to a vegan diet and threw away all the medications that a previous endocrinologist had prescribed. That worked well for nearly 3 years when the blood sugar was always lower than it had been when I was taking drugs. However, that was not a permanent fix. Apparently, nothing is ever permanent in diabetes. Eventually the numbers went up, I started visiting a new (to me) endocrinologist, and I allowed myself to get talked back into the old treatments that I already knew didn’t work.

    Taking more and more drugs all the time is not a path to improved health. I am now evaluating my long-term options.

    Let’s take this conversation offline or to some other venue, OK?

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Dick hope you are feeling better soon. Drug side effects and interactions do seem to be played down. Do what your body tells you..

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I had the same problem years ago and wound up in emergency room. I switched to insulin and haven’t had a problem in 20 years. A1c of 6.1.

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Did you read the information pamphlet that comes with the medication showing possible side effects? I would call the Dr and report what happened to you. Diabetes is tough and controlling it is not easy. We sure don’t want anything to happen to you.

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    —> Did you read the information pamphlet that comes with the medication showing possible side effects?

    No pamphlet was included with the pills I received. It was packaged in a generic white plastic bottle with a stick-on label printed at the drug store.

    However, I now know that WebMD.com has a LOT of information about this particular drug, much of that information is negative.

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😦 Sure hope you feel better soon!

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I think that’s why they call it “practicing” medicine! Your chemistry and the meds don’t always mesh well. Feel better soon!

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Being recently identified as diabetic, I do sympathise. Be well & good luck.
Vera Karger, CT

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    —> Being recently identified as diabetic, I do sympathise.

    My condolences. My advice: don’t believe everything that is told to you. Do a lot of reading but keep an open mind. Some of what you read will pure malarky, other things you read will be scientific facts, a few things you read might apply to others but not to you. The difficult part is deciding where any particular article fits into that matrix.

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So glad you are on the road to recovery.

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hmmm – talk to a pharmacist! – b

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So very sorry to hear this. I hope things are straightened out soon and you are back to feeling much better.

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Oh, I know your pain. I’ve been sent to two specialist with my problems [my diabetes is OK for now!!] and while the first one’s suggestions seem to be working, the 2nd one a month later now wants me to do exactly the opposite! It’s really interesting and I have no real idea of what to do. Both MD’s make sense and sound like they know what they are doing, but since what I’m doing now is mostly working, I think I’ll stay with that.
I do wish we could start out in our 80’s and get younger as the years go by – this old age thing is not really a lot of fun!!
Hope things work out a lot better soon for you. We miss you, but would rather you take care of yourself first.

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Glad you stopped taking them!

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Maybe you should check with your pharmacist about interactions and perhaps get a new doctor. Hope your feeling back to normal soon. Ginny

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Oh, Dick — Hope you feel better soon. Did you know that there are doctors whose speciality is dealing with the interactions between multiple medications prescribed for a patient and then working with the patient’s other doctors to minimize adverse interactions and side effects? My elderly aunt was referred to one of them under her Canadian healthcare coverage and the doctor’s assessment really helped improve her quality of life. I later learned that the US also has specialists who provide this service, but doctors don’t tell their patients about it nearly as often in the US as they do in Canada. It might be worth investigating, even if your insurance won’t pay for it.

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    —> Did you know that there are doctors whose speciality is dealing with the interactions between multiple medications prescribed for a patient and then working with the patient’s other doctors to minimize adverse interactions and side effects?

    Yes. I met with one of those specialists about six months ago when my endocrinologist apparently got tired of my constant complaining so she referred me to the medical center’s guru on drug interactions. He wasn’t able to help much although he was very sympathetic.

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Another case where a well-intentioned doctor with a prescription pad actually made a person “sick.” My wife is always telling me you have to make it your business to know what the doctor is prescribing and make sure the local pharmacist, who knows what you’re on and who knows all about drug interactions, weighs in before you start taking new drugs. Your story makes the point – glad you realized what was happening, Dick, and that you nipped the problem in the bud. Glad, too, that you’re getting back to your old self.

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It’s a bummer when the side effects are worse than the problem you’re taking the pills for!

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I’m glad you’re feeling better! I have been vlchf for 2.5 years now and A1C is holding strong, no meds. I have friends who’ve been eating this way for 10+ years and they are doing well – something to consider if you haven’t already. Trig’s cut in half, HDL doubled, bp down, lost weight, have more energy, etc. No grains, added sugars, or starches; prioritize protein. Sending hugs to you!

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    Thanks for the words of encouragement. I have been vegan for more than 4 years now and love it. My plan is to remain vegan forever, regardless of whatever else happens.

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Dick, I’m sorry to hear about your problems with your recent prescription. Some doctors, unfortunately, prescribe drugs way too quickly, and without enough information about the patient’s specific problem. Are you a type 1 or type 2 diabetic? Weight loss, of course, can be a real key to controlling type 2 diabetes. Your dietary changes could be especially helpful in that case.

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    OhioGuy, if you have seen him in person, he’s skinny compared to me. His problem is travels and who know what food he had to eat. And he’s type 2

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Sorry to hear about your reaction to the medications. Hopefully they can correct the meds, so you can get to feeling like yourself again.

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I missed you Dick and thought you had gone overseas.Hope you feel much better very soon
Di in Melbourne

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methinks it’s time for a new doctor

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I sympathise wholeheartedly – I’ve been the victim of the inadvertent mixing of well intended but mis-prescribed medications too. Trouble is there’s no way of knowing how a cocktail of different drugs will act together or on any one individual. You did the best thing in ditching them immediately, and hopefully the side effects will be short lived, and you’ll soon be firing on all cylinders. Get well soon!

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We still have a lot to learn in healthcare. I hope you feel better soon.

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DIck, hope you feel good again soon. My son, not a doctor, helped his almost 80 year old Dad change his diet and reverse his diabetes in 30 days and get off his medications. Dad is now 85. My son suggests the book, How Not To Die, by Dr. MIchael Greger, a NY Times best seller. And Dr. Greger’s website, Nutritionfacts.org. Go to topic, diabetes. Has helpful info. On the top 15 causes of death.

Love your blog. Best wishes to you.

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I’ve learned the hard way not to fill a prescription until I’ve had a chance to research it. I also only take a small part of it when I fill it for the first time.
I stopped taking an anti-inflammatory last night due to side effects. It astonishes me how casual people in the medical profession are about medication side effects and interactions. Fortunately, the doctors here are willing to work around my reservations. They still keep prescribing, though.
(I do take what I really need, that works without side effects, quite faithfully.)
Thanks for bringing this up. You obviously hit a nerve.

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Good heavens to Mergatroyd! Sorry you had to go through all that, but I can empathize!

Many years ago when I was first diagnosed with high blood pressure (and left bundle branch block at the same time at ER, a heart condition I had not heard of up until that point), I had to go to the doctor’s office and see a physician’s assistant so we could work out balancing which high b/p drug dosages worked together for me. She loaded me up with so many meds I had to resort to pill minders to make sure I took them on time (I still use the pill minders; in the middle of doing research I didn’t remember if I had taken my meds or not – this way I know which morning, noon, or night pills I’ve taken). My intuition told me she was over-prescribing too many meds (for b/p and heart issues, plus bone density and two different diuretics for edema).

The doctor’s assistant eventually left the clinic to go elsewhere…, and I saw the doctor instead, had a monitoring blood test, and before I got home he’d left a message on my answering machine that my blood tests were “off the chart odd,” and I had to go to ER immediately to do another blood test (he personally left the message, not any of the assistants or nurses so I knew this was serious). Turns out I was in the middle of kidney failure from too many meds which were immediately stopped, an IV was inserted and turned on as fast as it could go to flush out my kidneys and I was hospitalized for four days (and went home too soon). The doc apologized profusely to me for about three days in a row; the blood work that showed the kidney failure was an after-thought that day instead of planned, so the incident could have been a whole lot worse. The day after I got home I was right back in the hospital in an ambulance with foot pain so bad I couldn’t walk; gout was added to the other ailments.

Both the hospital doctor on staff and my own doctor told me on two different days during that first kidney failure episode “But you don’t LOOK sick!” When my doc said that, I turned to him and said “I didn’t meet with or see you until after I was diagnosed with high blood pressure and left bundle branch block. You’ve never actually seen me well…!” I suggested since I had to do monitoring blood tests for the meds anyway, why don’t I just get checked every few months at the clinic, so now I go every three months for blood tests and monitoring. High b/p, two knee replacement surgeries (the second one started my second bout of kidney failure), additional diagnoses for atrial fibrillation and irregular heartbeat because the right AV node was also not working well, followed by getting an ablation process and two-lead pacemaker last fall which makes me pacemaker dependent for the rest of my life (I have a pacemaker monitor at home now, too), my doctor still hasn’t seen me well. The regular heartbeat from the pacemaker has made my kidneys function better so my creatinine levels evened out for a few visits, but were getting high again last week when I saw him (high creatinine = gout foot pain). My gall bladder has been giving me fits off and on for a couple of years so I face another probable surgery, but I keep putting it off. My doc may someday preside at my death, but he’s still never seen me well. I may have to bring photos to a clinic visit one day to show him what I’m talking about. [As a side note, office chats revealed his mother was also born in the same hospital where I was born, her ancestors lived in the local area near where I grew up and were friends with my relatives, and on a hunch with having just names, was able to find their ancestors from Norway; later I also found one of his paternal English lines that arrived in the mid-1800s; he has a separate colonial New England line, too.]

The moral of that long tale (which is really only part of the story) is that if one thinks one is being over-medicated, consult one’s local pharmacist. I have a good pharmacy, two different pharmacists there plus assistants all know me now after all these years (I only use the one pharmacy so they know exactly what I take daily and which meds I only take if I have to), and if I get a new prescription for anything in addition to what I take daily, I ask for them to screen for adverse drug interactions, reactions, compatibility. They’re all very friendly, very good to me. If I have to, I ask the head pharmacist who is a terrific fellow with thorough info (and if they’re busy and don’t have time to talk, I ask them to call me when they’re not rushed), and, like you, I look up meds online (Wikipedia has basically the same info as the med info inserts they put in every bag when I get my refills, and when it comes to medical conditions and/or surgical procedures Wikipedia also has info, plus there are sometimes videos on YouTube put there by the companies that make pacemakers, artificial knees, and whatnot); if I don’t have time or don’t feel up to going to the store, they’ll mail the prescriptions to me. And don’t let the doctor or her/his staff brush you off. If they do, change doctors. Or pharmacists. Or get crabby and demand answers, or whatever (they’re collecting a lot of money from you, either via insurance and/or co-pays and/or deductibles; they better be nice!).

It’s your health, after all, and you want to stick around for a while yet. Take care, rest, and get back to the newsletter when you’re feeling a lot more perky than you do now.

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Dick, glad to hear you figured out the new meds didn’t agree with you. But that doesn’t solve the original problem that you went to your doc for. I guess that’s why the docs say they are “practicing medicine”. Someday lets hope they can get it right…if only the big pharmas drug reps stay out of it.

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Hope you are soon back to your better self

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Sorry to hear this happened. Hope you will be feeling better very soon.

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Dick wishing you well. My Mother had a similar type of event last week. She went on a “normal” antibiotic to get rid of a “mild” urinary track infection similar to what she has experienced multiple times in the past. This antibiotic was too strong for her 92 year old body. The antibiotic swept out the good bacteria with the bad and she ended up with a serious colon infection and diarrhea (called C-Diff in the medical profession). She was hospitalized and is now recovering at home but this event set her back health wise. otherwise good medicine applied to the wrong set of circumstances can have devastating impacts.

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Hope you “recover” soon. I didn’t read all the messages, but I did not see this one – Go to another doctor, the best you can find and get a second opinion. And a third if they don’t agree.

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Sorry you had a bad reaction to your meds, Dick. There is one drug that is commonly prescribed in conjunction with other diabetic meds that can cause blood pressure to drop dangerously low. It might be helpful to daily monitor your own vitals (b.p., pulse rate, etc.) at home to check your reaction to treatment, know better when to call doctor, etc. Veganism/vegetarianism seems to be a good choice for diabetics like us, as long as we also take B-12 supplements to counteract that “run down” feeling we eventually get. Sometimes certain drugs with certain foods (e.g. soy) can cause bad reactions, too. Hope you start feeling better–and use “WebMD” often,but in conjunction with a good doctor!

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    I know what you are talking about, my clinic specialist discontinued this one drug because it caused my levels to drop dangerously. In fact it is not to be taken by anyone having Type 2 effective immediately (I read the notice given to me by my specialist.)

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Kathleen McQuillan-Hofmann July 25, 2017 at 9:04 am

Hope you are feeling terrific soon.

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Dick, please allow me to share something with you. I was a so-called pre-diabetic (type-2 diabetes). About 8 years ago my doctor put me on Metformin to lower my blood sugar levels. Luckily I had no side effects. About a half year ago I decided to change the way I eat. I cut out as much sugar as possible, I also did not eat bread, pasta, any type of grain (including flour), and no dairy. The flower was replaced with coconut flour, the dairy with coconut and almond milk. When I had to use sugar, I used as little as possible and I used unrefined brown sugar. At the same time I also stopped to take Metformin and an another pill to lower my cholesterol. Two month later I went to see my doctor asking him to measure my sugar and cholesterol levels. A few days later he gave me the results. He said that all my levels are almost perfect. He also agreed with me not to take any medication since it would only mess up things. As a side effect, I have much more energy today then I had while taking the medication.
Dick, I not sure how you regulate your diet, but changing it can make all the difference.

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    —> Dick, I not sure how you regulate your diet, but changing it can make all the difference.

    Absolutely!

    I went through a similar dietary change 4 years ago. I switched to a vegan diet and threw away all my medicines at the time. My overall health improved dramatically within days. For nearly three years I took no medicines at all and my quarterly blood tests produced better results than they ever did when I was taking medicines.

    However, diabetes is a progressive disease. For most diabetics, the symptoms often get worse over a period of time. While I remain vegan, the test results slowly crept upwards. I allowed myself to get talked into taking medicines again. I now believe that was a mistake. I am taking too many medicines once again but plan to change that soon.

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Take care of yourself first and foremost!

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Hi Dick,

You keep saying “vegan”. Does that mean Fuhrman, McDougall, or something else? Within vegan, there is a huge range of possibilities. You can do anything from “eco-Atkins” which is heavily fat-based (nuts, avocados, …) to McDougall “starch-based” low-fat. My wife and I have been doing well mostly Fuhrman-based for 14 years now, but we did not have diabetes to start with.

Get well soon!

–Bruce

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    —> Within vegan, there is a huge range of possibilities.

    Agreed. I started with the Fuhrman plan but have modified it a bit as I keep reading more and more. However, I am still very close to what Dr. Fuhrman recommends.

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I am married to a Pathologist and he always tells me that the problem with the practice of medicine these days is a problem of ‘polypharmacy’ – too many prescription and herbal interacting drugs at one time! Before my recent back surgery they did a DNA test to see which drugs I take or which drugs they would give me that would have an adverse, no or positive effect on me specifically. It’s paid by Medicare and it would worth asking for it so this doesn’t happen again, especially since you have diabetes which quite often complicates treatment. Good luck and feel better.

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Hello Dick,

In the DoD medical system, a young primary care manager was changing and adding to my routine prescriptions without much explanation. When I challenged him in detail in an e-mail, he referred me to a Doctor of Pharmacy on his team. She straightened things out during a one hour consultation in light of my blood work history which is available in the electronic records. I ended up with a few changes which make sense to me.

Now what is a “pharmacist”? Here’s a quote:

http://www.pharmacytimes.com/contributor/douglas-jennings-pharmd-fccp-faha/2016/03/when-can-pharmacists-use-the-doctor-title

Historically, the Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy degree was sufficient for admission into a career as a pharmacist. In response to the increased complexity of pharmacotherapy and advanced training required for adequate provision of pharmaceutical care, however, the PharmD became the new entry-level degree for all practicing pharmacists in the United States in 2004.2 

Al Poulin

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I can understand your situation being over-prescribed. I had enough problems with prescriptions in a very short time few months, so bad enough to get referral to a endocrinologist to look at adjustment of my prescriptions. Big mistake and terminated that guy after only 2 months, AFTER I had 2nd set of eyes, who is 100 percent specialist in diabetic disorders (she is a professor at a university and volunteer at my clinic) take a look at mine’s and discovered the bad combination. She changed my Rxs in an hurry. Got my levels lowered in an hurry. Food was fine whole time. I can look forward to my A1C lowered in 3 months after a spike because of this guy.

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Hi Dick,
Do you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes? My wife and I both have Type 2. Over two years ago my doctor warned me that if I kept doing what I was doing I’d be on dialysis in two years. As of that day in March 2015 we have adhered very closely to a low-carb diet, i,e., very little bread, no rice, no pasta, and no potatoes. Our A1Cs dropped from 7.3 and 7.5 down to 5.4 and 5.8 (and we lost weight besides). I am on no medication and my wife takes two metformin a day (she has the genes for diabetes from her ancestors). Instead of our blood sugar each morning averaging about 145, mine averages about 96 and my wife’s about 103 (and these are only because we are not quite as strict as we used to be).
We enjoy your newsletters very much and have served two family history missions for the LDS Church on the British floor of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. We just returned from the second one on 1 April. Now we are service missionaries working at home with FamilySearch on the FamilySearch Wiki.
Best wishes,
Ben and Eileen Bailey

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Dick,
Reporting adverse reactions to drugs is an important freedom we have. Many generic drugs at not equivalent to the original. The FDA will act only if enough people report their adverse reactions. You can do this at: https://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/HowToReport/ucm053074.htm .
Also, go to http://www.peoplespharmacy.com where you will find leads to both scientific information and anecdotal information regarding your situation. Joe and Terry Graedon specialize in pharmaceutical reactions and interactions providing a service to give information that a non-medical person cannot find. Their specific information on diabetes can be found at https://www.peoplespharmacy.com/store/health-guides/managing-diabetes/ . You could write to them about your specific situation stating all 5 drugs for a second opinion where I assume they will not support taking 4-5 pills for any one disease or taking an additional pill to counteract a side effect.
We wish you the best of health.
Kim

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Margaret Kamigaki July 25, 2017 at 10:58 am

Glad you are feeling better. Hope to have you back at full speed soon. You know us, we can’t get by without our “Dick Fix!” 😁

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Dear Dick, It is time for a second opinion and maybe a different Internal Medicine or Diabetic Dr. Sorry. almost lost adult child with this type of behavior from the Dr. Susi Pentico

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Glad to hear you are feeling better. We must always remember that doctors “practice” medicine on us! 🙂
Sue

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Oh UGH, so sorry! Have read that some DNA study(ies) have shown there is individual variety in how well (or badly) various medications work for us and/or what their side-effects are. Sounds like in your case the devil you know is the better choice 😦

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Rachel M. Aguilera July 25, 2017 at 1:14 pm

I hope you notified your doctor. They really need to know when you have side affects that are so bad they put you down for even a day. Maybe she needs to check out the other medication you are taking and do some modifications.

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I know exactly what you are going through! I complain too and am told I HAVE to stay on the Metformin even when I should the doctor the truth that it is dangerous. Believe me, ALL doctors on on the take! They had me taking 24 pills a day and I did my own research as you did and took myself off 10 of them. I’m still fighting the Cardiologist, Diabetic doctor and I don’t know who else, but I’m getting off most of them on my own! Good Luck!

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SARAH C WINCKELMAN July 25, 2017 at 2:26 pm

Change doctors. There was no research done by this one on why the pills you were taking were not working’ I have diabetics and had a time getting things ironed out. Another pill added to what you already take is no answer. Google the pills you are now taking and see how they work and what the side effects may be. Good luck

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Dick…we have to take the time to be our own doctors! I have a wonderful supportive one who compliments me for taking charge of my life. PLEASE get tested for food sensitivities. So many of my favorite things were actually poisoning me: beef, coffee, chicken eggs, bananas, yeast, and the worst of all, CORN which is in everything. I even make my own baking powder now. I feel good now. And, another thing, if you are at a desk…get up!

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Hello Cousin,
Here’s hoping you’re on the mend. Just a note. Take your “bad” prescription or any of your unused prescriptions back to the pharmacy and let them dispose of it properly. Usually they can incinerate old or unused medications. It’s a safe way to make sure they don’t get into the ecosystem or accidentally get into the wrong hand and harm someone else.
I hope you’re back to 100% soon.
All the best from Northern BC

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I suggest you talk with your pharmacist. They are generally more knowledgeable than doctors about interactions and reactions of drugs.

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Check out the spice Cinnamon, really.

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Sorry this has happened. Be careful. I was put on 2 diabetes medication. One took 3 months to get into my system. When it did, my blood sugar dropped to near vegetable status. If I had waited any long I would have died. It took more than a month for it to leave my system. I had to stay with my children or fear going into a coma.

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I know exactly what you mean, MY memory is getting so bad sometimes I get really frustrated. So I read about the side effects of my meds. All of them so that they have been shown to affect Memory. So what do I do, lose the rest of what little memory I have or stop taking the meds and get really sick… Can’t win for losing.

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Feel well soon!

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Diabetes is a tough enemy. I finally had to move to insulin and one injectable. The added injectable seems to help keeping things in a narrow range. Expensive but what can can you do.

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Hope you’re feeling better now…sorry to hear about the meds making you so sick 😦

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ROBERT ERIC PENTECOST July 26, 2017 at 9:54 pm

Dick,

So sorry to hear of your troubles, but happy to hear that your on the path to recovery.
Please get healthy – live long and prosper so you can keep advising, informing, researching and writing for the rest of us.

My two older brothers (md’s retired) have always quipped to me when told of someone’s non-life threatening problems with a doctor or Rx – “Remember, we are practicing medicine – we have not perfected it.”

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Dick,
Just picked this up and was very sorry to hear of your troubles. I hope you can get everything sorted very soon (or that it’s already sorted by the time you read this). Keep taking good care of yourself and get second opinions. It’s been nice to read all the helpful suggestions here.

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Glad you’re better Dick. I know you’re smart and a good researcher. Have you checked out Dr. Jason Fung, a nephrologist from Toronto?

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    —> Have you checked out Dr. Jason Fung, a nephrologist from Toronto?

    No. A nephrologist is a medical doctor who specializes in kidney care and treating diseases of the kidneys. A diabetic typically is treated by endocrinologists, those who diagnose diseases related to the glands.

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    Dick, the nephrologists do check on diabetes along with kidneys. I know because I had been checked at least on annual basis to ensure no damage to kidneys due to diabetic medicine.

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Last month I made the same mistake: I went to see a doctor. First time since Nixon was in the White House. They ran the usual new patient tests, then more test and then put me on some pills and now I feel lousy. Tired and grouchy. They seem to believe if they don’t feed you their pills and potions they’re not doing anything. The takeaway lesson from all the comments here is that people have to take charge of their own health care and not rely on the opinion of any single doctor.

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Dear Dick
So very sorry…we adults!!!! have too many RX’s…I rely on my pharmacist First…then look into the drug…so many side effects are harmful…Do take care and hope the recovery comes quickly….Patty

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