Kaspersky Now Offers a Free Antivirus Program for Your Windows PC

Kaspersky is a Russian security vendor that offers several well-known and well-respected anti-virus and anti-malware (“malevolent software) products. Now the company is launching a free version of its award-winning antivirus software worldwide. Kaspersky Free offers the most basic protection for free for everyone who wants it. And all without bombarding you with ads.

Kaspersky Free is now available in selected countries. In the words of Eugene Kaspersky himself, it offers “the bare essentials: file, email and web antivirus; automatic updates, self-defense; quarantine; and so on.” These are essentially “the indispensable basics that no one [Windows user] on the planet should do without.”

The free product will occasionally suggest you might want to upgrade to one of Kaspersky’s paid offerings that include extra protection, such as parental control, online payment protection, and a VPN (Virtual Private Network). However, the company also promises that such suggestions will not be obnoxious or frequent.

Since this product is from a Russian company, many Americans and a few others may be suspicious that the product will be spying on its users. However, that has never been true of previous Kaspersky products, according to security experts who performed independent testing, looking for any suspicious activities. In addition, CEO Eugene Kaspersky wrote in his blog post announcing Kaspersky Free, “We detect any cyberthreat regardless of its origin or intention – even if certain folks don’t like it”.

Kaspersky Free runs on any Windows system, from Windows XP up to Windows 10.

Kaspersky Free is being rolled out around the world in stages, starting with the U.S., Canada, and several Asia Pacific countries. When it becomes available in your region you can download it directly from the Kaspersky website at https://www.kaspersky.com/free-antivirus.

33 Comments

Kaspersky is not a company I would trust. Possible ties to nefarious Russian hacking.

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Russia? Anything cyber related? Ahhh, no. Windows Defender for me. Putin has enough money… LOL

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They are on the federal no buy list because of security concerns. Thee was an article in the Washington Post a few days ago

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Trojan horse. This is not a risk people should take.

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I used to have them, but they are so difficult to use, and with all the Russian hacks, do I really want them on my genealogy computer?

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I agree. No Russian software on my computer if I can help it.

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This is nothing new. They among others have been offering this for a long time. All of these others are a lot better than windows as it is not reliable. And as far as where it is from a lot of these things you don’t really know unless you really dig deep and even then it may be hidden. Just like a lot of products say American when actually they are Japan or Korea.

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I’ve never used Kaspersky but for many years it’s been regularly scrutinized by reputable reviewers and given high marks. It’s unlikely that compromising code in the software would go unnoticed by tech experts.

Russian state hacking is reprehensible, but there’s no reason to think Kaspersky is complicit in it. The only reason I’ve never considered using Kaspersky is that I started with Norton decades ago and have never had a reason to change.

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With all the globalization of companies who is to say that a product with an American name might really be made in China, Russia or any other country. Or it is an American company owned by China or Russia, etc.

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    Every day the WaPo is full of hysterical lies. I trust Putin more than WaPo. We should all know by now not trust just one source when doing research.

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5 heads of US intelligence agencies advised members of Congress and anyone listening to delete this software off their computers, especially companies it is a security risk according to FBI, CIA, NSA, forget the rest that were there someone from DOD. I would never use this and if I found anyone I know using it I would tell them to get rid of it immediately.

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In reference to the above comments concerning possible spyware in Russian software:

So here is a question: We all know the CIA often hacks into foreign networks, both the networks of governments and of foreign corporations. In fact, the CIA does not hide the fact that they break into all sorts of networks worldwide and then collects billions of messages and personal information from Americans and non-Americans alike. The news services have been full of those stories in recent years.

Should we also refuse to use software produced by American corporations because of the possibility there might be spyware in those products, produced in cooperation with the U.S. government’s CIA and other agencies?

Actually, there is already spyware in software produced by American corporations at the request of the FBI and other government agencies. For details, go to any search engine and search for “FBI encryption backdoor” (without the quote marks).

Apple is already on record as refusing to honor the FBI’s request but most other U.S. corporations have remained strangely silent. Many people worldwide assume that numerous American corporations are already creating and selling spyware products at the request of the U.S. government.

Are you suggesting that we refuse to install software from American corporations because it probably has spyware?

I believe there is a greater likelihood of spyware in American-produced software than there is in Russian-produced software, simply because agencies of the U.S. government are already on public record as asking for that from many software companies. The same thing may or may mot be true of the Russian government. Russian corporations may or may not be under the same pressures as American corporations.

Then there’s the Australian government… (See https://privacyblog.com/2017/07/17/prime-minister-of-australia-malcolm-turnbull-displays-shocking-lack-of-understanding-of-encryption/ )

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    Wow Dick? Really? I STRONGLY – but respectfully – disagree with you. The whole diplomatic world is becoming unhinged and I wont fund it. Kaspersky was involved in some pretty cloak and dagger stuff for the Russians… Maybe you missed that?

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    —-> Kaspersky was involved in some pretty cloak and dagger stuff for the Russians… Maybe you missed that?

    Nope. I saw the allegations. (Not proven but very interesting and certainly possible.) I also have read how Microsoft, Google, and a number of other companies are doing the same thing in collusion with the U.S. government. What’s the difference?

    It is an obvious violation of the U.S. Constitution’s Fourth Amendment (remember that document that used to be important?): “…[t]he right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

    I consider illegal spying on citizens to be evil, regardless of who the perpetrators are.

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    They probably are already there!
    RE DICK’S COMMENT: So you think that since governmends are or maybe, in a Cyber War we might as well not only unlock our doors but invite them in and serve them tea!
    I believe that IF THERE IS ANY CHANCE THAT USING HIS PRODUCTS COULD BE DETRIMENTAL we should avoid them and certainly not advertise for him….paid or unpaid.

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    Exactly. It’s no “secret” that the U.S. government is spying on its own citizens and is pressuring American companies to build back-doors in their software that are accessible by the government. So who to trust? I trust the thousands of hackers across the globe who independently examine software looking for anomalies. You can bet that if someone found an issue with Kaspersky it would make front-page headlines – and his business and reputation would be ruined. I have used AVG and Avast in the past ahd have no immediate desire to go through a replacement hassle. AV software deeply embeds itself into the OS. But over many years Kaspersky has had an excellent reputation and I would not hesitate to use it on my own machines.

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C Christopher Sirr July 27, 2017 at 11:02 pm

Fraught with danger! Does anyone believe that any Russian entity is immune from government demands? Probably more important than stolen information, is the possibility that Russian agents could plant a sleeper virus, with the ability to cause nation-wide havoc at the moments whim of the KGB.
Does anyone think that Mr. Kaspersky, as well intentioned as he might be, could stop a dictatorship from confiscating his assets?
C. Christopher Sirr
Warwick, Rhode Island

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    —> Does anyone believe that any Russian entity is immune from government demands?

    No. Probably not. Not any more than an American company is immune from American government demands. (Except Apple, the only American company that has publicly refused to do what the American government has demanded.)

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C Christopher Sirr July 28, 2017 at 9:44 am

If you lend just a little reflection upon the matter of intrusion by our American Government “demands” you should realize their intentions (currently not Socialist as the prior administration) are for the purpose of national security. Apple protests too much and has little regard for national security and a haughty regard for their customers..

Russia (the government) has no regard for the United States and demonstrates a desire to subjugate other nations. Anyone who truly thinks otherwise, probably still harbors love for the Tooth Fairy and may be a member of a Cargo Cult.

C. Christopher Sirr
Warwick, Rhode Island

Liked by 1 person

I watched a Congressional hearing on national security a few months ago, and the experts were asked if any would have Kaspersky software on their own computers and 4 out of 5 said no. Last night, Richard Engel, NBC foreign correspondent, was in Moscow and did a segment on Kaspersky. Kaspersky himself is an FSB grad (formerly the KGB). Once KGB, always KGB. There is plenty of other software available without using Russian software.

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    I saw that Richard Engel special as well. I think Mr. Eastman should watch. I personally believe this is the worst post you have ever had.

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    When the DNI, CIA Director, NSA director, FBI acting Director all say they would not have this software on their computers, I pay attention. They know stuff we don’t know. I highly recommend everyone watch Richard Engel’s “On Assignment” from Moscow. The head of Kaspersky Labs says the Russian government hasn’t told him to do anything. That is not how Putin and the Kremlin operate. If they suggest, or hint or outright tell an oligarch or head of company to do something, they do it. The alternative is you will be dead very soon, and not of natural causes. This is truth.

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The technical experts of the British consumer group ‘Which?’ have tested Kapersky software and found it best of all paid products at what it says it can do. None of the above people who are so suspicious of it know anything concrete, they are just passing on someone else’s suspicions. Surely if the software was dangerous a western specialist would be able to make a concrete statement and give proof instead of all this mindless panic.

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    C Christopher Sirr July 29, 2017 at 10:18 pm

    Taking risk can sometimes be a rewarding venture. However the decision to engage jeopardy is tempered by knowing the consequence of failure.

    When a rushed pedestrian, facing a “Don’t Walk” sign, contemplates crossing a street with heavy traffic, does he or she, in the absence of concreate evidence of danger, disregard common suspicions about the threat and cross before the “Walk” signal?

    Would you walk on thin ice just because you saw a few people make it across? A wise person would change course and stick to terra firma.

    There is no pressing need for anyone to dance with the Russian Kaspersky Bear.

    C. Christopher Sirr
    Warwick, Rhode Island

    Liked by 2 people

C Christopher Sirr… Very wise – I too follow your philosophy. I have one question for Dick. Do YOU have a Kaspersky product on YOUR computer?

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    —> I have one question for Dick. Do YOU have a Kaspersky product on YOUR computer?

    No, but probably not for the reason you think. I normally don’t use Windows and therefore don’t have any need for any of the Kaspersky products or any competitive products from other companies that sell anti-virus software or similar “security” products.

    I normally use either a Macintosh or a Chromebook and occasionally use a Linux computer. (I use the Linux system mostly to access my bank account and investment accounts.) One of the reasons I don’t use a Windows computer is because of all the problems with viruses and other malevolent software (often called “malware”). I have wrestled with virus problems in Windows too often in the past. Never again!

    Admittedly, I do also own a Windows laptop that I use occasionally when reviewing Windows software. However, I haven’t turned it on in several months. (There aren’t many genealogy companies releasing new Windows software these days.)

    If I did use Windows, I wouldn’t hesitate to use a Kaspersky product. As I pointed out earlier, many products produced in the USA have spyware in them so that the CIA can spy on you. I think spying is evil, regardless of which flag flies over the spy’s office. Next, as someone else pointed out here, “The technical experts of the British consumer group ‘Which?’ have tested Kaspersky software and found it best of all paid products at what it says it can do.” Other security testers have also tested Kaspersky and found it to be secure. I believe the security experts more than I believe Congressmen and Senators.

    Does Kaspersky software contain spyware? Possibly, although I doubt it. Since it has been tested by various experts and found to not contain spyware or other malevolent software, it is less likely to contain spyware than the competitive products produced in the USA.

    The only software I trust to never have spyware is the various open source products that publish their source code. I use a lot of open source software.

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    Caveat emptor. The risks are great like putting the fox in charge of the hen house. When there are so many other choices I feel that it is irresponsible to not warn people. Faulty reasoning here. I am so disappointed in your doubling down. This is not about the boogeyman, this is a very real threat. When the heads of all our intelligence agencies and the government itself does not recommend a product due to “potential” security risks it’s like driving through a red light and saying “well I could see no one was coming so it’s okay.” At least some sort of disclaimer or warning is in order, sir.

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I had the Kaspersky software installed on my XP earlier this year – thought it was going to be the answer to security for my old, outdated system. But Kaspersky was CONSTANTLY questioning EVERY program I tried to open – even when I went into the list and said yes, this program is okay; programs took MUCH longer than normal to open and ran slowly. But the final straw was the computer lockups causing me to have to reboot. The last one took three consecutive reboots, having to start in safe mode on one. I uninstalled Kaspersky and have had no issues since then. I DO NOT recommend this software, at least not on an XP machine.

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I understand all the questions & statements concerning this software. However, at this moment, I am more concerned over the demands of our president wanting our SS number, address, telephone number, political party we associate with, all our voting from the past, date of birth, & all other personal information. What I don’t understand is why he feels the need for all of our personal info. I am more concerned over this than any software.

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    C Christopher Sirr August 4, 2017 at 12:36 pm

    What is your documentation about the “demands of the president” wanting all your personal information? And why are you, “at this this moment”, more concerned about him than you are about the Russians?
    Are you muddling the documentation regarding the story about the president’s desire to clean up the voting roles and prevent illegal voting?

    It would appear that you must be a Kaspersky user and have no concern about loosing your personal data to the Russians as long as the president, according to you, does not take far less than the Russians. Interesting logic.

    C. Christopher Sirr
    Warwick, Rhode Island

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    It’s been all over the place that he wants this info. It appears to me he is more concerned with the popular vote & not getting it than he is being a successful president. He is obsessed with numbers for some reason. If he would just do the job he was elected for, he might be more popular than he currently is. He wanted to be the president so he just needs to concentrate on that & being the best president he can be. As for Russia, it appears he & the whole family have a very good relationship with Putin & his country. I am not saying that is such a bad thing if it helps us all get along. But if true, meddling in the election is not what we need. We need true & honest elections in this country, no matter the outcome.

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C Christopher Sirr August 4, 2017 at 2:43 pm

Not wanting to appear mean, let me offer a gentle observation. “It’s been all over the place that he wants this info” is not documentation. Also the real topic is Computer Security. Your selection of security software is your own business.

C. Christopher Sirr
Warwick, Rhode Island

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