New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Over 2.9 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:

Billion Graves Cemetery Indexes

We regularly update our collection of cemetery records from BillionGraves. All of the record sets have been added to this time, allowing you to pinpoint your ancestor’s final resting place across a number of countries via GPS-tagged headstones.

This latest update includes:

Findmypast’s partnership with BillionGraves aims to make available all the cemetery records held on their site for free. Each entry has a transcript, which includes a link to an image of the headstone with GPS details. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include a combination of the deceased’s name, birth date, death date, and cemetery, city, county and image link.

Middlesex Monumental Inscriptions 1485-2014

West Middlesex Family History Society has provided us with additions to our Middlesex Monumental Inscriptions from All Saints, Fulham.

Each record includes a transcript with a varying amount of information. Most of the transcripts include full name, age, birth year, death year, dedication, location and monument type. You’ll also get notes on the inscription which could include the names of others buried in that plot or more specific details regarding age and birth and death dates. An external link in each record will bring you to a document which includes images and burial ground plans for All Saints church in Fulham. The entire Middlesex Monumental Inscriptions collection now stands at over 45,000 records.

North West Kent Burials

We’ve added over 6,000 records from Sidcup Cemetery in Bexley to our collection of North West Kent burials.

The records include a transcript of the original burial register and will usually reveal your relative’s name, burial date, residence, place of burial, county, country and age. Some records may also contain extra notes about the burial. The term, North West Kent, is used to describe areas within the London boroughs which were historically part of Kent; such as, Greenwich, Bexleyheath and Chislehurst and these records were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society.

New York Researcher

Our ongoing partnership with The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B) brings you another edition of their quarterly review, New York Researcher.

96 new images have been added to the collection which provides invaluable insight on conducting family history research on the people and places of New York state. The collection is comprised of PDF files of the original publication and allows you to search by keyword or narrow your search by volume, issue, page number, or publication year.

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record

Another fascinating resource from NYG&B, The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record is the second oldest genealogical journal in the US and details the people and places of the Empire State from the 17th century onwards. We’ve added a further 389 images in this latest update.

The fully searchable PDF files in this collection can contain all manner of information on your New York relatives including biographical sketches, family genealogies, including lists of descendants, record transcriptions and abstracts, pedigree charts, local history, notices of life events, such as baptisms and marriages, society proceedings and notes and much more.

2 Comments

FindMyPast is not cheap, but it is a marvel of information. I love the weekly listing of new stuff. I have to look at a number of these burials; these long-dead people would be stunned to see me electronically peering down upon them.

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I use a VuPoint magic wand scanner I bought at a yard sale for $5 to scan anything from old newspapers, books and photographs to family docs. IT’s either B&W or color and saves to a micro SD card and is 10inx1inx1in. I’ve done hundreds of pics and articles from the newspaper morgue for a local museum’s files.

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