‘Aboriginal’ Redacted from Australian Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates after Being Deemed an Offensive Term

Vital records worldwide are becoming more and more politically correct. A West Australian bureaucrat has deemed the use of the term “Aboriginal” may be regarded as offensive and exercised a little-known power to redact it from birth, death and marriage certificates. However, not everyone agrees with this decision.

It has shocked historians, who were unaware of the practice and say Aboriginal is considered by most to be an inclusive term. “Way back in the past people might have hidden their Aboriginality … it’s now a source of pride for many people of Aboriginal descent today,” according to Jenny Gregory, Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Western Australia.

This means historians, native title claim groups and members of the public may be spending up to $49 to buy a document which may have historical detail like Aboriginality removed without their knowledge.

You can read the full story by Rebecca Turner in the ABC News web site at: https://ab.co/2GFRRKE.

5 Comments

Sorry, seems everyone is offended these days by historical information. I understand it has been used that way, but to me it indicates they were the original settlers of Australia! Makes one wonder if this is another “pollitically correctness” that has gone haywire.

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    More likely some petty penny-ante little bureaucrat all puffed up with his own self-importance gone off on a power trip. If anything was offensive, it was the dismissive attitude of the department to the gentleman who had ordered a copy of his own mother’s birth certificate specifically in order to confirm that she was indeed of aboriginal origin, when he specifically asked for a copy *without the redaction.* He said they made him feel like they thought he ought to be ashamed of his heritage.

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Why would anyone would be shocked over this? We did this to our own Native Americans, only worse. Now everyone is looking for Native American in their DNA.
Take a look at the 1925 NY State census for Onondaga Co. It is a fabulous census on the Indians on the Reservation.

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Odd that some would find aboriginal offensive. It makes more sense than the American term “Indian”. Personally, I prefer the Canadian nomenclature of “First Nations”.

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This will only make it worse for people who are looking for their ancestors. We can’t change the way they were treated or named in the past. People need to consider the history around these ‘politically incorrect” names and phrases, and realize we can’t change history and we need to understand the situation at the time. These terms were commonly used and not in a derogitory way at the time.

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