Conserving Sudanese Cultural Heritage

I doubt if this will directly help many readers of this newsletter. After all, probably very few readers of an English-language genealogy newsletter have Sudanese ancestry. However, I will suggest it is an excellent example of preserving documents and photographic material for future generations. Perhaps we all can learn from this example.

A two-year project aims to conserve and digitise a range of written and photographic material held in archives in Sudan. Decades of conflict in the region has resulted in a failing economy and Sudanese archives are now under threat due to under investment and poor protection measures. Much of the cultural heritage and practices recorded in present-day physical archives are disappearing as traditional life is eroded by population movement.

A large volume of at-risk content will be captured, including 100,000 maps, fragile photographs (in excess of 10 million) and AV materials documenting disappearing cultures and customs.

You can read more in an article in the British Council web site at: http://bit.ly/2LB63uV.

My thanks to newsletter reader Richard J Heaton for telling me about this worthwhile project.

2 Comments

But if it helps one family historian, your time is worth it.

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This is very interesting. I will pass it along ….

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