IGRS adds Co. Londonderry / Derry Census Substitute

The following announcement was written by the Irish Genealogical Research Society:

The Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS) has added a new census substitute database to its website. The Balteagh Regium Donum Petition of 1828 notes details on approximately 200 families, comprising 1,023 individuals, residing in sixteen townlands lying to the south-east of the town of Limavady, Co. Londonderry / Derry.

The petition refers to the Presbyterian congregation of Balteagh’s attempt to claim a share of the Regium Donum (or Royal Bounty) Fund, established by Charles I in 1672 for the upkeep of Presbyterian clergy in Ireland. It notes, by townland, the head of each family, spouse and children (if any). For instance, in the townland of Ballyness & Maine is the family of Joseph Perrie and his wife (though unnamed) and their six children: Bettyann, Sarah, Lavinia, Joseph, Martha and Isabella. Unfortunately, ages are not recorded, but alternative sources will likely allow ages to be established or estimated.

The index entries in the database are linked to scanned images of the original document, which forms part of the Official Papers series at the National Archives of Ireland.

The full database is a members’ only resource, but name searches can be made freely by all.
Database landing page:
https://www.irishancestors.ie/resources/unique-resources/balteagh-census/.

Click here to view a rather large sample image of one page from the Balteagh Regium Donum Petition of 1828.

2 Comments

“The petition refers to the Presbyterian congregation of Balteagh’s attempt to claim a share of the Regium Donum (or Royal Bounty) Fund, established by Charles I in 1672 for the upkeep of Presbyterian clergy in Ireland.”
I’m sure you mean Charles II, because his father had been dead for 23 years in 1672.

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    —> I’m sure you mean Charles II, because…

    I didn’t mean anything as I didn’t write that announcement. As stated in the first line of the announcement: “The following announcement was written by the Irish Genealogical Research Society”

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