MyHeritage DNA Testing Featured on the Dr. Phil Show

U.S. residents are probably familiar with Dr. Phil’s television show. Dr. Phil says he was always aware of his Irish ancestry, but it wasn’t until he submitted a simple cheek swab to MyHeritage DNA that he realized there was more to his lineage. He used MyHeritage to test his ancestry.

“Dr. Phil, we found that you have three distinct ethnicities in six distinct countries,” says MyHeritage consultant Yvette Corporon.

MyHeritage identified 20,000 relatives of Dr. Phil in 64 different countries. Among other ancestors, he hears for the first time about Pascal Rice, a great-great-grandfather born in 1826, who served as a private in the Mexican war. MyHeritage also found triplets in the family.

You can watch the video to learn Dr. Phil’s response to discovering more about his family history and ethnic roots at https://www.drphil.com/videos/dr-phils-surprise-family-connection-found-with-myheritage-dna/.

The segment includes a special coupon for free shipping on DNA kits.

9 Comments

How do I find more about dna as seen on dr Phil>

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    —> How do I find more about dna as seen on dr Phil

    Go to https://www.myheritage.com/dna

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    Ancestry has theirs on sale for $59 until after christmas and has a larger DNA membership base than MyHeritage and millions more genealogy records. Familysearch.org is the largest database for research and is free. I think MyHeritage is too small to get much out of.
    Also go to Facebook and look at some of the DNA groups, DNA Detectives is one best to ask questions in. There are also hundreds of really great genealogy groups in FB to share and ask for help of others that have been working on their family trees for longer and you may find family on these groups too.

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Since DNA tells so much, why isn’t this information used by medical professionals to match transplant patients?

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    I’m not quite sure in what context your question is, but here are my thoughts… I don’t believe that transplant teams can arbitrarily contact DNA matches and ask them to donate a kidney or part of their liver. That being said, they already have a system in place that matches donors with people registered and WILLING to donate – including relatives.

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I would suggest the question people need to ask themselves is “how did MyHeritage identify 20,000 relatives using DNA?” My take would be they used trees in order to do this (as well as the DNA) but to me this is false advertising. MyHeritage gives me 8,000 matches but even of the ones I see many are minimal matches and if I were to check thru them all would likely find that many of even these are what they call “noise” (could be related to the area of an ancestor) such as 0.1% and are rated by MyHeritage as “low confidence”.
Just did a check of matches on Ancestry and with 1097 pages of 50 matches per page indicates 54,850 matches – however, note that on my front page I only have 849 matches of 4th cousins or closer – 5 are 3rd cousins or closer and the 844 left are in the 4th cousin range.
As noted above by Susan, Ancestry is known to have the biggest pool of people who have tested but more than that if you test with others first and then want to be part of the Ancestry ‘pool’ of testers you will need to get retested but if you test with Ancestry first then often for free or in some cases a small fee you can upload your raw DNA to the other DNA companies to gain access to their ‘pool’ of testers.
People also looking to making matches with other DNA Companies upload their raw DNA to GedMatch (also free) where you can get matches made with those who previously tested with Ancestry, FamilyTree DNA, MyHeritage etc.
I have no affiliation with any of these companies, just saying, don’t be swayed by the ‘glory’ advertising (of any subject) do your research of what you want out of spending your hard earned money.

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I have been searching for my gg grandmother’s maiden name for many years, and was about to pay for help. I did notice a while back on one of her children’s death certificate it listed her maiden name as Borens. I played around with different spellings, and still nothing. I recently got 4th cousins DNA matches on Ancestry, when I checked our shared matches quite a few of us were related as 4th cousins. That is when I realized her last name was Burns. I was so happy.
On Ancestry I have also matched up a few distant cousins. We know our early relatives, in which I found most of the info, so from there on we see how we have family ties. Some info was found through oral stories.

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I have tested with 23 and me and with Family Tree. I have 2nd cousins thru these sites, but when I uploaded to MyHeritage, I found European relations that confirmed my theory of where my great grandfather was born in Switzerland. I also have a close match to an Irish person which I hope will to identifying where one of my other great grandfather was born. In summary, I think if you are looking for Europeans, Myheritage is best.

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