The Digital Library of Georgia has Digitized Approximately 53,930 pages of Historic Georgia Newspaper Titles Published Prior to 1861

As part of a $14,495 grant from the R. J. Taylor, Jr. Foundation, the Digital Library of Georgia has digitized approximately 53,930 pages of Georgia newspaper titles published prior to 1861 from microfilm held by the Georgia Newspaper Project (http://www.libs.uga.edu/gnp/).

The project creates full-text searchable versions of the newspapers and presents them online for FREE in its Georgia Historic Newspapers database at http://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu in accordance with technical guidelines developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress for the National Digital Newspaper Program (see https://www.loc.gov/ndnp/).

You can learn a lot more about this valuable online resource in the blog of the Digital Library of Georgia at: http://blog.dlg.galileo.usg.edu/?p=7152.

4 Comments

The historic newspapers collection of the Digital Library of Georgia has been an incredible resource for my family history research and is one of the internet sites I most use. From searches on the site I learned of two murders in the family during the 1800’s, the strange disappearance of a great great grandfather, the three marriages of a great aunt, sheriff sales where property was sold off to pay debts, prizes awarded at county fairs, the premature death of children due to accidents or disease, family reunions, as well as marriages and births. The news of the local communities also provides valuable context to understand the daily lives of my ancestors.
Every 2-3 months I return to the site and repeat searches, always digging up new nuggets of information from the same newspapers. It may be the search technology is improving over time. I’ve also gleaned much information by using alternative spellings of names as well as searching on the names of friends and neighbors from census records. Sometimes the search on the name of a neighbor will turn up an article in which one of my ancestors is mentioned, yet a search on my ancestor’s name did not turn up the same article.
If you have George ancestors, I highly recommend this resource.

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This is such a great resource for those of us who have deep roots in that state. Is there any way we might learn of other projects the R. J. Taylor, Jr. Foundation might have funded?

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I have been using this website about ten or twelve years. It is great, but the change of search engines is terrible! The 2 word feature: i.e. John Williams brings up all ‘Johns’ and “Williams”, whereas the old engine brought up ‘John Williams’-an individual from multiple issues of the same paper-defined by year selected!

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