Relative Risk for Alzheimer Disease Based on Complete Family History

A recent medical study finds that if your family history shows Alzheimer disease (AD) amongst close relatives, your risk of developing the same disease are increased. A population resource including a genealogy of Utah pioneers from the 1800s linked to Utah death certificates was used to estimate relative risk for AD based on specific family history constellations, including from first- to third-degree relatives.

The study’s conclusion states, “This population-based estimation of RRs [relative risks] for AD based on family history ascertained from extended genealogy data indicates that inherited genetic factors have a broad influence, extending beyond immediate relatives. Providers should consider the full constellation of family history when counseling patients and families about their risk of AD.”

The study isn’t very reassuring to those of us with relatives who suffered from Alzheimer Disease!

You can read an abstract of the study published in the Neurology web site at: https://n.neurology.org/content/early/2019/03/13/WNL.0000000000007231.

All the details of the study may be found at: https://n.neurology.org/content/neurology/early/2019/03/13/WNL.0000000000007231.full.pdf although that document is full of medical terminology and is obviously written for medical professionals.

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