New Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Over 644,000 new Cincinnati records have been added to the Catholic Heritage Archive. As well as adding new transcripts, images of original documents have been digitized are now available to view on Findmypast.

The collection, released in partnership with the Dioceses of Cincinnati, covers 103 parishes and consists of indexes of baptisms, marriages, burials and congregational records spanning the years 1800 to 1979.

In 1850, Cincinnati was the 5th largest city in the United States. Its location on the Ohio River made it a popular stopping off point for immigrants and pioneers traveling west, many of whom stopped long enough to create a sacramental record. Early in the history of the Archdiocese there were large numbers of German and Irish immigrants spread throughout its counties and, by the end of the 19th century, there were joined by increasing numbers of Italians and Eastern Europeans.

Today’s release forms the latest in a series of substantial updates to Findmypast’s exclusive Catholic Heritage Archive, a ground-breaking initiative that aims to digitize the historical records of the Catholic Church in North America, Britain and Ireland for the very first time.

This week’s update includes:

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms

Over 297,000 additional records that will reveal your ancestor’s baptism date, baptism place and parent’s names.

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Marriages

Explore over 182,000 new additions that are perfect for uncovering previous generations and adding new branches to you growing family tree. The transcripts and images collection contain information on for both the bride and groom including marriage date, location and parents’ names.

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Parish Burials

Over 183,000 new records that will reveal your ancestors birth year, death date, age at death and place of burial. Some records may also reveal the names of your ancestor’s next of kin and the nature of their relationship.

Cincinnati Roman Catholic Congregational Records

Did your ancestor receive their confirmation? Were they a benefactor of a parish? Search over 1,200 new Cincinnati Roman Catholic Congregational Records to find out.

British & Irish Newspaper Update

This week we are delighted to have passed the fantastic milestone of 33 million British & Irish pages on Findmypast, with 90,812 new pages added over the last seven days.

We have updated six of our existing titles this week. There are extensive twentieth century additions to both the Aberdeen Press & Journal and the Aberdeen Evening Express. We also continue to augment our wonderful collection of specialist titles. We have added over 30,000 new pages to The Queen, a society magazine which covers the goings-on of high society, but also is a unique record of femininity in the Victorian era. We have also updated three of our early Labour titles – Clarion, Labour Leader and Forward (Glasgow).

3 Comments

Great! Now I can hunt up many of my German cousins who moved from Germany to Cincinnati area.

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Are these free on Find My Past or does this require a subscription?

Like

    They allow a free search, but you pay to see the records. You can, of course, always mail for the records once you know what do request.

    Like

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