Latter-day Saints Church Turns Over 4 Centuries of Digitized Catholic Records to the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines

From an article in the Lifestyle.inq web site:

“In a low-key but historic event, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints through its FamilySearch arm, recently turned over digitized Philippine Catholic Church records spanning four centuries to the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP).

“The digitized documents from 1614 to 2014 were personally received by Davao Archbishop Romulo Valles and Caloocan Bishop Virgilio David, president and vice president of the episcopal conference, respectively, at the CBCP office in Intramuros, Manila.

“Handing the documents which included birth, marriage and death certificates, as well as canonical decrees, and inventory of church objects were FamilySearch (formerly called the Genealogical Society of Utah) officials led by the area manager for the Philippines, Felvir Ordinario.

“Ordinario said the files, composed of 14 million images, were collected from different dioceses and parishes in the country—the oldest from Binmaley, Pangasinan, dating back to 1614, and the most recent from Biliran province, in 2014.

“He said the documents constituted 400 years of records of the Filipino people that were preserved by FamilySearch and the files would help historians, researchers, Christians at large, and the Filipino people.”

You can read the full article at: https://tinyurl.com/eogn190925.

3 Comments

Was this just giving them a copy? Or does this mean that they will not be available on their site at some future date?

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https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Philippines_Church_Records#Online_Records
The Family History Library has filmed many Catholic Church records. Look in the FamilySearch Catalog, (https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/results?count=20&placeId=218&query=%2Bplace%3APhilippines)Locality section, under:
PHILIPPINES, (PROVINCE),
(MUNICIPALITY) – CHURCH RECORDS

Some records would be available on the web, others may require access from within a local Family History Center. Access is determined by the collection owner.

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