Book Reviews: Derry, Ireland Publications written by Brian Mitchell

The following book reviews were written by Bobbi King:

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT Brian Mitchell

Brian Mitchell is an extraordinarily talented Irish genealogist, both as a member of the Accredited Genealogists Ireland (M.A.G.I.) and the energetic author and compiler of Londonderry/Derry records. He is the genealogist with the Derry City and Strabane District Council, from where he offers anyone wishing to trace their roots in North West Ireland his most skilled advice. He graciously shares his work with online search links and responds to queries from the web page http://www.rootsireland.ie/derry-genealogy.

Here are some of his Derry publications, all published by the Genealogical Publishing Company:

Derry – Londonderry: Gateway to a New World
2014. 32 pages.
A small book that summarizes the importance of Derry as a port of emigration for Irish emigrants. There is a 1910 map of the network of railways running out of Derry illustrating the rail paths of travelers coming from the inland to Derry. There are a couple passenger lists, photos of sea and river ships, and a general overview of 17th, 18th, and 19th century emigration out of Derry.

Tracing Derry – Londonderry Roots
2014. 67 pages.
This smallish book describes how to research records connected with Derry-Londonderry roots despite a fire in 1922 that destroyed many documents. There remain many records as explained here: civil records, church registers, wills, censuses, and Tithe Appointment books, and some general information. The author offers details on repositories where the records may be found.

The Place Names of County Derry
2016. 106 pages.
This book contains, in Part 1, the 1,750 place names for the city and county of Derry (Londonderry) as recorded in the 1901 census. With each place name is chronicled its District Electoral Division, parish, registrar district, Poor Law Union, and 17th century landowner name. Part 2 contains parish reports for each of Derry’s 46 civil parishes of the mid-19th century, including location, description, the top 10 surnames of the parish, and major record sources for that parish.

The People of Derry City 1921
2016. 172 pages.
Extracted from the Derry Almanac and Directory of 1921. The annual Derry almanacs are the closest in-lieu-of-census documents for Derry for the years 1912 – 1936. The tumultuous year of 1921 was selected for the importance of the Anglo-Irish Treaty which ended British rule in most of Ireland on 6 December 1921. The book contains entries for 8,288 heads of household, including surname, given name, street address, house number, and page number of the listing in the Derry Almanac.

The Top 300 Surnames of Derry – Londonderry
2017. 70 pages.
These 300 top surnames, as selected by frequency of occurrence, were compiled from the 1989 Foyle Community Directory, with explanations of their origins. For further research, the reference books consulted for the Foyle Community Directory are listed, offering further assistance for surname research. There are maps included for the reader to locate the region of the surname source.

Brian Mitchell’s books are all available from the publisher, Genealogical Publishing Company, at https://genealogical.com/ as well as from Amazon at: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=%22Brian+Mitchell%22+Ireland&ref=nb_sb_noss.

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