SnipTag – a Helper Macintosh App for Genealogists

SnipTag is a photo scanning and metadata (adding captions and other information) program. It is useful for anyone who us scanning or manipulating digital photographs on a Macintosh but it strikes me as being especially useful for genealogists. I think it would be excellent for digitizing an old photo album that hasn’t been opened by family members in years as well as for other uses.

Of course, once the photos have been digitized, it is easy to share an entire photo album with family members by email personal web sites, or in any of several other methods.

Here are some statements from the SnipTag web site at https://sniptagapp.com/: (Keep in mind this is advertising written by the company, not an unbiased review written by me):

SnipTag for Mac
Two powerful tools – One for your printed photos, one for digital

Have hundreds of old printed photos? Scan up to eight at a time with any scanner, or four with any phone or digital camera. Import all into SnipTag and watch it magically crop and save them individually.

Doing in seconds what would have taken hours of repetitive, boring work.

SnipTag is easy to use and does more than other image cropping programs. Besides, its’s much more powerful than mobile apps. It crops JPG, PNG, TIFF and BMP images, and saves cropped photos in their original format and resolution.

[End of copy-and-paste from the SnipTag web site]

SnipTag can be used to add short or long captions to each photo. The captions can even be embedded inside the photographs and therefore will be included if the photos are copied or forwarded to other family members.

Pricing is a bit complicated although the intent is “pay only for what you need’ (to copy the words from a popular television commercial for a different company’s products):

  • Weekly subscription: $0.99/week, for users with one-off need, or those who want to try the app before choosing one of the other options
  • Quarterly subscription: $6.99/three months. This is for users with short projects
  • Yearly subscription: $15.99/twelve months – a big discount over the shorter subscriptions. Good for users who want to take their time
  • One-time price: $24.99, for users who want to use the app on an ongoing basis, or those who don’t like recurring subscriptions.

There is a lot more information available at: https://sniptagapp.com/. You can also watch a short video showing SnipTag in use at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3419FAL2atM as well as in this video player:

NOTE: Not all web browsers and email programs can play videos embedded in a web browser or email message, such as this article. If you cannot see the video above, open a web browser and go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3419FAL2atM.

7 Comments

Is there a similar app for Microsoft based computers?

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FYI Dick – I would caution against using Windows for metadata editing. Their fields do not adhere to industry standards for adding metadata to images, which then means your data is at risk for getting lost because the metadata is not getting attached to the photo in a way that plays well with others. I’ve recently done a presentation about digital photo management, including principles for adding metadata, and discuss why I caution against Windows. It’s at http://www.taneya-kalonji.com/genblog/my-digital-photo-organization-approach/. Hope it’s helpful!

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    Like all operating systems, Window stores metadata about files in its filesystem store, not in the file itself. This is why metadata can get lost when files are transferred between operating systems (and even between thumb drives and computers, as thumb drives use a different filesystem). Windows programs can edit metadata which is attached to the file – EXIF, IPTC/XMP, and accessible from any operating system, but this metadata is not visible in Windows Explorer, although Windows may attempt to copy from some EXIF metadata to Windows. This is why it appears in Explorer, and can apparently be edited but the edits do not persist as the EXIF data is copied afresh the next time the metadata is viewed. So don’t change operating systems because of this. Lots of photo management software reads and supports editing of file-based metadata so if you use one of these you can perform search and selection just as you can in Windows Explorer.

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Like all operating systems, Window stores metadata in its filesystem, not in the file itself. This is why metadata can get lost when files are transferred between operating systems (and even between thumb drives and computers, as thumb drives use a different filesystem). Windows programs can edit metadata which is attached to the file – EXIF, IPTC/XMP, and accessible from any operating system, but this metadata is not visible in Windows Explorer, although Windows may attempt to copy from some EXIF metadata to Windows. This is why it appears in Explorer, and can apparently be edited but the edits do not persist as the EXIF data is copied afresh the next time the metadata is viewed. So don’t change operating systems because of this. Lots of photo management software reads and supports editing of file-based metadata so if you use one of these you can perform search and selection just as you can in Windows Explorer.

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