MyHeritage Announces New Colorization Settings for MyHeritage In Color™

MyHeritage (the sponsor of this newsletter) has announced that you can now customize the settings for MyHeritage In Color™ to achieve even better results for your colorized photos. Quoting from the announcement:

MyHeritage In Color™ is an automatic colorization feature that brings your old black and white family photos to life using sophisticated machine learning technology. It has become one of our most popular features recently, with nearly 11 million photos colorized in less than 3 months!

We are pleased to announce that it is now possible to customize the colorization settings of MyHeritage In Color™, to improve its results even further.

The quality of automatic photo colorization depends on many factors, such as the quality of the original photo, its resolution, lighting, contrast, sharpness, and so on. In most cases, MyHeritage In Color™ will produce excellent results. However, in some cases there is room for improvement. Adjusting the settings allows you to fine-tune the colorization process, giving you more control over your final image and resulting in a higher-quality colorized photo that you’ll be more than proud to share.

This beautiful couple, Jacquie and Norman Levy, were photographed together in 1947 in Denver, Colorado in this black-and-white photograph:

Though the default colorized version does give us an idea of their skin tone and hair color as well as Jacquie’s lipstick and the white flower in her hair, the color “bleeds” a little into her jacket:

Lowering the rendering to 16 produces a blue background that gives us some nice contrast, making their faces “pop” more, and reducing saturation gives Jacquie’s complexion a slightly more natural color. The clothes look more natural too:

You can read a LOT MORE about the new capabilities and also view a number of before-and-after images in the MyHeritage Blog at https://blog.myheritage.com/2020/05/new-colorization-settings-for-myheritage-in-color/.

3 Comments

Is there a way to have a photo colorized without it being attached to your name and family tree? I had 2 photos colorized earlier then was surprised they were attached to my name even though they may not have even been related to me. Plus, I would like to be able to save the picture to my computer after colorization. How can a person do that?

Like

    —> I would like to be able to save the picture to my computer after colorization. How can a person do that?

    Place your cursor over the image, right-click, and select “Save image as…” The wording might be something different, depending whether you are using Macintosh, Windows, Linux, Chromebook, or some other operating system but will be close to “Save image as…”

    —> Is there a way to have a photo colorized without it being attached to your name and family tree?

    There probably is a better way but why not let it be attached to your family tree, then save the image to your computer using the method I just described, then delete the image from your online family tree? The entire process shouldn’t take more than a minute or so and there will be no image left in your online family tree.

    Like

I hope that they do something about the “oversaturation” problem in my opinion.

Like

Leave a Reply

Name and email address are required. Your email address will not be published.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <pre> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: