MyHeritage Updates the Theory of Family Relativity™

MyHeritage (the sponsor of this newsletter) has refreshed all the data for the Theory of Family Relativity™. This much-anticipated update can provide you with new and improved theories that explain how you and your DNA Matches may be related, give you answers about relationships that have baffled you, and offer new insights about your ancestors and family relationships.

If you are not familiar with MyHeritage’s Theory of Family Relativity™, the best description I have found is that it “leverages all the data available on MyHeritage, such as family trees and historical records, to provide you with plausible theories as to how you may be related to a given DNA Match.” The results are exactly what they are claimed to be: THEORIES, not proven facts. In short, the MyHeritage computers have compared millions of DNA records against your DNA sample and said, “These are possibilities, you might want to check these to verify whether or not they are your relatives.” These possibilities then need to be reviewed by you to determine if the theory is really a fact or not.

MyHeritage’s databases have grown considerably since the last update, to include millions more family trees and 2 billion additional historical records. This can open up new avenues for discovery and increase the likelihood of finding a theory as to how you and your DNA Matches are related.

Theory of Family Relativity™ latest update by the numbers:

The total number of theories has increased from 14,260,864 to 20,330,031 — a 42.6% increase.

The number of DNA Matches that include a theory increased by 42.5% from 9,964,321 to 14,201,731.

You can read all the details in the MyHeritage Blog article at https://blog.myheritage.com/2020/05/update-to-theory-of-family-relativity-2/.

4 Comments

Charles Lundquist May 11, 2020 at 2:23 pm

Dick,
That is great news! I have had lots of trouble trying to connect myself with their present theory of family relativity. So, when should I go back through the numerous emails from My Heritage to check on changes and try new re-connects?
I really like what they are trying to do, even if we haven’t made many connections.
Thanks much.
Chuck Lundquist

Like

    —> So, when should I go back through the numerous emails from My Heritage to check on changes and try new re-connects?

    Now. However, I suspect it will be even more productive to check the NEW email messages you receive in the future. I plan to do BIOTH as time permits.

    Like

This past week I got a doosey of a Theory. They tried to connect me up with someone using four trees – MyHeritage’s connections were all wrong because people have bad data.

Like

    —> MyHeritage’s connections were all wrong because people have bad data.

    The Theory of Family Relativity is called a THEORY for a very good reason. It is designed to supply theories, not proven facts.

    The online documentation stresses this very clearly. In the old days (such as last year) finding matching DNA centiMorgans was a very labor-intensive process. Most people who did that spent hours loading information into spreadsheets or some similar process and then MANUALLY scanned hundreds, perhaps thousands, of entries looking for matches. Even then, it was not proof of a relationship. Instead, it showed you possible or theoretical relationships. You still had to revert to old-fashioned and well-proven genealogy techniques to prove a relationship.

    MyHeritage’s computerized Theory of Family Relativity replaces the manual work of manually scanning spreadsheets and other reports but the results are the same: a THEORY, not proof. The THEORY still needs to be proven or disproven by good old-fashioned and well-proven genealogy techniques.

    Like

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