Posts By Dick Eastman

More Enhancements to Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps added by Randy Majors

I have written before (at http://bit.ly/2BiDNWE and at http://bit.ly/2EkIz9e) about Randy Majors’ work to make Google Maps more useful to genealogists. He obviously has not been resting on his laurels. He writes:

Google Maps county line tools on randymajors.com now let you search using your current location

You can now search using your current location on all randymajors.com Google Maps mapping tools (in addition to searching by place, address, etc.):

County Lines on Google Maps (covers U.S., U.K., Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Switzerland)

Historical U.S. County Boundary Maps

ZIP Codes on Google Maps

Latest write-up here: https://www.randymajors.com/2018/12/now-use-your-current-location-on-all.html

Making a Genealogical Journey to Québec City

Québec City is rich with history, artefacts and documents – all of which make the search for French Canadian ancestry relatively straightforward. Searching records online through the Monastère des Augustines and sites like PRDH are highly recommended, and, of course, so is a trip to Québec City.

Jean-Pierre Gendreau-Hétu did exactly that. Luckily for the rest of us with French-Canadian ancestry, he was interviewed by Pamela MacNaughtan who then wrote about the trip, describing the genealogy journey. If you have French-Canadian ancestry from the Quebec City ancestry and would like to research the archives where those ancestors lived, you might first want to read the article in the Quebec City Tourism’s Website at: https://blogue.quebecregion.com/en/things-to-do/genealogy-journey and also watch the video below or on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/QVt1D4bVl8k.

David McElroy Elected to Fellowship of AGI

The following announcement was written by the Accredited Genealogists Ireland (AGI) :

On Friday, 7th December, at AGI’s 31st Annual General Meeting in Dublin the election was announced of David McElroy as a Fellow of the Association, recognising his decades’ long contribution to the pursuit and study of Irish genealogy.

(above) AGI FELLOW PAMELA BRADLEY WELCOMES DAVID MCELROY AS THE ASSOCIATION’S NEWEST FELLOW.

It was in 2004 that Accredited Genealogists Ireland (AGI) established the status of Fellow of the Association to mark significant contributions by members to the world of Irish genealogy. Since then there have only been five elected, with David now being the sixth.

Over 2 Million Portsmouth Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Leading UK family history website Findmypast has today published over 2.4 million new records in partnership with the Portsmouth History Centre.

The records are full of fascinating details of Portsmouth life through the ages and will provide researchers from all over the world with the opportunity to uncover the stories of the inhabitants of the UK’s only island city for the very first time. Fully searchable transcripts of each original document are also included, enabling anyone to go online and search for their Portsmouth ancestors by name, location and date.

Hampshire, Portsmouth, Portsea Island Rate Books

Search through over a million pages of poor rate books from as early as 1700 through to 1921. The books recorded the amount of rates paid at each property, ownership of the property, and its location in the parishes of Portsea and Portsmouth. Discover the history of your ancestral home, today. With each record you will find a transcript of the vital facts and an image of the original rate poor.

Poor rate books were records of the amount of rates paid and by whom. Rates were levied annually and collected from both property owners and occupiers. The money was used for local poor relief. The Poor Law Act of 1598 made the parish responsible for the poor. The original records are held at the Portsmouth History Centre.

Hampshire, Portsmouth Hospital Records

Fold3 WWII U.S. Draft Registration Card Collection Expanded

Fold3 has added four new states to the company’s collection of U.S. WWII Draft Registration Cards. The collection now contains cards from Montana, Kansas, Pennsylvania, and Oregon. The cards in this collection are registration cards for the draft and do not necessarily indicate that the individual ever served in the military.

Thousands of Ottoman-Era Photographs from Turkey are now Online

If you have ancestors from Turkey, you will be interested in a new online collection of photographs. The digitization project focused on photographs from the nineteenth century until World War I (Series I–VIII), resulting in 3,750 individual records of digital files.

Pierre de Gigord Collection of Photographs of the Ottoman Empire and the Republic of Turkey, 1850-1958

French collector Pierre de Gigord traveled to Turkey and collected thousands of Ottoman-era photographs in a variety of media and formats. The resulting Pierre de Gigord Collection is now housed in the Getty Research Institute, which recently digitized over 12,000 of the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century photographs, making them available to study and download for free online.

The Cousin Explainer

Trying to determine all the relationships of all your relatives at a Christmas gathering? A tea towel can help.

As described on the web site where you can order the towel:

“Second cousin once removed, or first cousin twice removed? Calculating cousin-hood has never been easier with this brilliant tea towel. Finally you can establish which of your cousins are once, twice or even thrice removed. A hand lettered design by Geoff Sawers.”

This Newsletter is Sponsored by MyHeritage

 

(Click on the above image to take advantage of this offer.)

US: ONLY $49 + Free Shipping on 2+ Kits.

*This is the lowest price offered by MyHeritage this year!

(+) How to Watch “Who Do You Think You Are?” on the TLC Network without Cable

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

The most popular television program amongst genealogists in the United States probably is Who Do You Think You Are? Admittedly, I don’t have statistics to prove its popularity, but my conversations and the email messages I receive from genealogists mention that program more often than any other.

Who Do You Think You Are? is broadcast on the TLC Network, a service normally available only on cable television channels and on satellite television. That’s a problem for anyone who doesn’t have one of those services.

NOTE: That includes me. I “cut the cable” a few weeks ago when my local cable company sent me a notice saying that the company was going to increase my monthly bill significantly. I reacted by immediately calling the cable company and demanding they cancel my subscription to cable television but keep my subscription to the company’s high-speed broadband Internet service. Actually, this is the second time I have “cut the cable.” I did the same thing a few years ago when I lived in a different place and had cable television service provided by a different company.

Luckily, for me and for other genealogists, there are multiple methods of legally watching each episode of Who Do You Think You Are?

On the Web

New Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 10, 2018

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch added over 8 million indexed records from Ireland, England, Peru, the United States, and Ukraine.Of the records, 4.4 million originate from the 1911 Ireland Census. In the United States, records come from Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Mississippi, Washington, West Virginia, and The Veteran’s Administration.

Research these free new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

Report on Josh Duhamel’s appearance on “Who Do You Think You Are?”

Unsolved: The Murders of Tupac and the Notorious B.I.G. star Josh Duhamel was the celebrity guest on this week’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are?. He found some unnerving information about one of his distant ancestors, including interrogation and torture.

Duhamel traveled to England to investigate the extraordinary life of his twelve times great-grandfather, Thomas Norton. A visit to the Tower of London, the U.K. College of Arms, and Cambridge University resulted in Duhamel examining numerous original documents written in the 1500s.

You can see a bit more of the program in the following video:

(+) Boolean Basics – Part #2

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

NOTE #1: This is part #2 of a 2-part article.

Part #1 of this article introduced the concept of Boolean search terms for use on Google. That article is still available to Plus Edition subscribers at https://eognplus.com/2018/12/10/boolean-basics-part-1/. You might want to read that article again now to refresh it in your mind before proceeding with new topics. This week I will describe several advanced topics.

MyHeritage DNA Testing Featured on the Dr. Phil Show

U.S. residents are probably familiar with Dr. Phil’s television show. Dr. Phil says he was always aware of his Irish ancestry, but it wasn’t until he submitted a simple cheek swab to MyHeritage DNA that he realized there was more to his lineage. He used MyHeritage to test his ancestry.

“Dr. Phil, we found that you have three distinct ethnicities in six distinct countries,” says MyHeritage consultant Yvette Corporon.

World War I Newspaper Clippings, 1914 to 1926, are Now Available Online

Quoting from the Library of Congress web site:

“The massive collection, World War History: Newspaper Clippings, 1914 to 1926, is now fully digitized and freely available on the Library of Congress website. The 79,621 pages are packed with war-related front pages, illustrated feature articles, editorial cartoons, and more. You can search by keywords, browse the content chronologically, and download pages.

Genealogy Data Helps Track Back Rare Disease Alleles to Quebec Founder Families

A Canadian team has harnessed genealogical data from Quebec to retrace the history of a rare recessive disease called “chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia” (CAID), using a computational approach for inferring rare allele transmission history.

Researchers from McGill University and elsewhere used their software package, known as ISGen, to analyze past transmission of CAID alleles with the help of high-quality genealogical data for more than 3.4 million individuals of European ancestry in the Canadian province. The approach traced the rare heart and digestive condition back to French settlers who arrived in the region in the early 17th century, the team reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

You can read more in the research team’s announcement at: http://bit.ly/2Svhp3k. A free registration may be required, however.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Boolean Basics – Part #1

Book Review: How We Survive Here

The 2019 Version of Heredis is Now Available

If You Don’t Want to Deal with Family Skeletons, Don’t Look in the DNA Closet

Mitochondria Reportedly Can Come From Fathers Too

Jewish Cemeteries in Poland to be Mapped and Entered into an Online Database

Photopea: A Free Alternative to Photoshop

FamilyTreeWebinars.com Adds Captioning to Hundreds of Genealogy and DNA Education Classes

TLC Releases a Bit of Information about the Future “Who Do You Think You Are?” Episodes

(+) Boolean Basics – Part #1

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman.

NOTE #1: This is part #1 of a 2-part article.

Probably all genealogists have used Google for genealogy searches. For many of us, we go to https://www.google.com, enter the name of an ancestor, click on SEARCH and hope that a reference appears that points to the person we wish to find. Sometimes the name search works well, and sometimes it doesn’t. When it doesn’t work, many genealogists give up and move on to something else. This is especially true with common names when a standard Google search may find hundreds of people with the same name. However, with just a little bit of effort, you may be able to quickly narrow the search to a single person or at least to a manageably small group of people. The trick here is to use some search terms defined 164 years ago.

Josh Duhamel to be the Celebrity Guest on This Week’s Episode of “Who Do You Think You Are?”

Josh Duhamel, “Transformers” star, will be featured in this Tuesday’s edition of the U.S. version of Who Do You Think You Are? The show is broadcast on TLC, available primarily on cable and satellite television services as well as on a delayed basis in the future on the program’s web site at: https://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are.

Last week’s episode with Mandy Moore is now available online at the same web address: https://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are.

Godfrey Memorial Library Now Has a New Web Site

You can check it out at: http://www.godfrey.org:

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.