Posts By Dick Eastman

Online eBook: Acadian Culture in Maine

If you have Acadian ancestry, especially those who moved from Acadia to northern Maine, you will want to read a 92-page report on the history and culture of Maine’s upper St. John Valley that is available online free of charge. Acadian Culture in Maine, a 1994 publication of the National Park Service can be found on the web site of the University of Maine at Fort Kent Acadian Archives at http://acim.umfk.maine.edu.

acadian-culture-in-maine

The 1994 print run was limited to 1,000 copies that sold out quickly. The Park Service did not have the necessary funds for a second publication. Now the Park Service has made the book available online at no charge. The result is lower expenses for the National Park Service and a much wider audience for this reference book.

The Acadians featured in this book are those Americans of French descent connected by history to the upper St. John Valley of Maine and New Brunswick, including the descendants of early Acadian settlers of the St. John Valley.

Alaska State Historical Records Advisory Board seeks Applications for Journeyman

Would you like to train others in how to preserve old records? Would you like to travel in Alaska, a fascinating state?

The Alaska State Historical Records Advisory Board (ASHRAB), a board which promotes the collection, preservation, and accessibility of historical records found in Alaskan repositories, is sponsoring a Journeyman Archival Processing Program. This venture will fund the work and travel of two journeyman-level archivists as they travel to an Alaskan repository and offer six weeks of hands-on archival arrangement and description services.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

The notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Why You Want to Archive All Your Email Messages – Part #1
Book Review: The Spyglass File
MyHeritage Adds United States WWI Draft Registrations, 1917-1918
Facebook Users want to Continue Posting from Beyond the Grave
The Security of Your Mother’s Maiden Name
MacFamilyTree 8.1 – New CloudTree offers Collaboration and Sync
Library of Congress, Digital Public Library of America To Form New Collaboration
Fold3 Commemorates Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary with Free Access to WWII Records and Stories Honoring Living Survivors
Freedmen Bureau Celebration to be Broadcast Live on the Internet
Maine’s Alien Registry of 1940 is Available Online
Millions of New Parish Records added to the TheGenealogist
Mississippi State University Libraries Digitize Civil War Diaries and Letters
New Records Available to Search this Findmypast Friday
New Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records Available to Search at Findmypast
Providence (Rhode Island) Public Library opens a large Genealogical Collection to the Public
Records of (Some) Irish Soldiers Now Available Online
NGS Family History Writing Contest Nominations Are Now Being Accepted
Los Angeles to Bury 1,430 Unclaimed Deceased Bodies
What Was Your Ancestor’s Property Worth?
pCloud: Better than Dropbox?
The Myths About Chromebooks
Manufacturer Refurbished Asus Chromebook Flip C100PA
Seth Meyers’ Family History
No, Not a Professional Gynecologist!
It is the First Day of the Month: Back Up Your Genealogy Files
Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

This Newsletter is Twenty-One Years Old!

(+) The Best-Kept Secret Competitor to Dropbox

(+) The Easiest Methods of Selling Information on the Web – Part #1

The Myth of Wearing White Gloves

Family Tree Website Reveals Personal Address, Family Information

Oklahoma Birth and Death Record Indexes are now Online

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Ohio

Colorado, Connecticut, Missouri, and Ohio

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

This Newsletter is Twenty-One Years Old!

It’s time to get out a bottle of bubbly to celebrate. Today is a great time of celebration for me. Never in my wildest dreams did I ever dream that 21 years would be so interesting, so much fun, and so rewarding. The very first edition of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter was sent 21 years ago on January 15, 1996.

Twenty-one years has slipped by in almost the blink of an eye. It seems like only yesterday that I sent the first e-mail newsletter to about 100 people, mostly members of CompuServe’s Genealogy Forums. The last time I looked, this newsletter now has 75,000 readers tuning in everyday! If you would have told me that 21 years ago, I would have never believed you.

This little newsletter started as a way for me to help my friends to learn about new developments in genealogy, to learn about conferences and seminars, and to learn about new technologies that were useful to genealogists. I especially focused on what was then the newly-invented thing called the World Wide Web. In 1996, many people had never heard of this new-fangled thing and many more didn’t understand it.

(+) The Easiest Methods of Selling Information on the Web – Part #1

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Many local genealogy societies as well as private individuals have created collections of information of interest to genealogists. These might include images of local census records, transcribed local tax records, extracts of land deed transactions, lists of veterans, scanned images of old and out of copyright genealogy and local history books, or even videos.

Traditionally, these collections have been printed in booklets and sold at modest prices to any genealogists interested in the data. With ever-increasing expenses of printing and postage, along with the inability to publicize these efforts, printing and selling these booklets continues to be more difficult every year. Luckily, publishing on the web reduces the expenses significantly. Search engines such as Google and Bing also help a great deal with the publicity. Even better, the buyer of the information can obtain electronic copies within seconds after payment, all without society volunteers or others having to stuff envelopes, calculate the postage, and take the packaged booklets to the post office. If it can be digitized, it can be sold online.

Lower expenses, less effort, instant gratification for the purchaser, and less labor involved sounds like a win-win-win-win process! There is but one question: “How do we do all that?”

100-year-old Film of the Red Baron (Baron Von Richthofen) is Available Online

Talk about an old film! It’s from 1917, and it’s an up-close and personal look at the most legendary combat pilot who ever lived, the infamous Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen. It shows the Baron preparing for a mission, as well as film of him putting on a flying suit prior to a flight in cold weather. If you look closely you will also see a brief glimpse of Hermann Goering.

The Baron was shot down on 21 April 1918 by Roy Brown of the Royal Navy Air Services, long before it was called the R.A.F.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

findmypast_logoOver 1.5 million new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Yorkshire & Derbyshire Methodist Baptisms

Yorkshire & Derbyshire Methodist Baptisms contains over 42,000 records that will allow you to see if your ancestor was baptised in a Methodist Church between 1795 and 1997. The collection covers the densely populated Sheffield district. Sheffield is located in South Yorkshire, traditionally part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, and many of its suburbs stretch into Derbyshire.

Each record will provide you with a transcript created from original church records by the Sheffield & District Family History Society. The details in each record will vary, but most will include your ancestor’s name, birth year, baptism date, denomination, chapel, place, parent’s name and county.

Yorkshire & Derbyshire Methodist Marriages

Dallas Genealogical Society 2017 Writing Contest

The following announcement was written by the Dallas Genealogical Society:

dallasgenealogicalsocietyDallas, TX, January 12, 2017 – The Dallas Genealogical Society announces that its 2017 Writing Contest is open for entries beginning January 1, 2017. This is the fifth year that the Society has sponsored this contest which comes with cash prizes.

The contest is open to both members and non-members of DGS as well as amateurs and professionals. Only original material not previously published elsewhere in any format is eligible. Entries will be accepted January 1 through March 31, 2017. Winners will be announced in July 2017.

High Winds Damage Cemeteries in Colorado Springs

This must have been some storm! City officials closed all cemeteries in Colorado Springs, Colorado, indefinitely because of the damage caused by the wind.

Evergreen cemetery has nearly 50 trees toppled. Many hit and damaged headstones below. “There’s a lot of 100 year old graves, 140 year old graves that there’s nobody to contact,” said Manager Jody Sanchez Skamarak.

Registration Opens Feb. 1 for International German Genealogy ‘Connections’ Conference in July

The following announcement was written by the International German Genealogy Partnership:

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.—Registration opens Feb. 1 for the 2017 International Germanic Genealogy Conference, set for July 28-30 in Minneapolis, Minn.

Early, discounted registration runs through March: $225 for individuals belonging to organizations that are members of the International German Genealogy Partnership (formerly German-American Genealogical Partnership), and $250 for all others. Regular registration begins April 1 at the standard rate, $299.

Register by completing and mailing a print form or by completing the online form available at the Partnership website www.IGGPartner.org, set to go live in late January. Print forms can be downloaded from the website and are also available through local genealogy societies that are members of the Partnership.

Findmypast Announce Four Days of Free Access to Over 1.9 Billion Records

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

  • Findmypast_logoFindmypast makes all birth, marriage, death & census records free to search and explore from Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January 2017
  • Free access covers all records hinted against in Findmypast’s family tree builder
  • This includes 583 million UK BMDs, the largest collection available online including over 80 million exclusive parish records you won’t find anywhere else, over 10 million Irish Catholic Parish registers and over 140 million United States Marriages
  • Family historians will be supported with expert insights and how to guides

London, UK. 12th January, 2016

Family Tree Website Reveals Personal Address, Family Information

Snopes.com reported on a family tree website that is causing a lot of alarm to the general public as it reveals a lot of personal information.

FamilyTreeNow.com claims to be a family history and genealogy web site but seems to be primarily a site that publishes public information about individuals. In fact, there are a number of other web sites that do the same (Spokeo, Intellius, BeenVerified.com and perhaps a dozen or so others) for a fee but FamilyTreeNow.com provides basic information free of charge.

The website allows anyone to enter a person’s name and then displays whatever personal information the web site knows about people of that name. In many cases, results show personal information along with the names, ages and addresses of people they are related to.

NEHGS and the Boston Archdiocese to Cooperate in Building the Nation’s First Extensive Database of Church Records

The Boston Archdiocese is partnering with the New England Historic Genealogical Society to create the nation’s first extensive database of church records to help people trace family histories.

The plan is to create a searchable database of millions of baptisms, marriages, ordinations and other pivotal life events recorded from 1789 to 1900 at more than 100 Boston and Eastern Massachusetts parishes — a project that could take up to 10 years and cost an estimated $1 million, which will be paid for with proceeds to a Historic Catholic Records Fund the society is launching.

Details may be found in an article by Marie Szaniszlo in the Boston Herald newspaper at https://goo.gl/rSAUeo as well as in the project’s companion website at: https://catholicrecords.americanancestors.org.

(+) The Best-Kept Secret Competitor to Dropbox

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Do you like Dropbox? However, are you frustrated with its shortcomings? If so, would you like to have a better service that costs much less? A service that gives you one terabyte of space for $5 a month? Yes, that’s FIVE BUCKS a month for a huge amount of storage space!

How about an online file storage and synchronization service that works with Windows, Macintosh, Android, iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and even Kindle Fire devices? A service that has far better security than Dropbox, with all data encrypted not only during transfer to and from the online service but also when stored on the service? A service that is so secure that even the system administrators for the service cannot read your private files? A service that has been around for a couple of years and already has tens of thousands of users? A service provided by one of the industry giants that is famous for its security and reliability?

If so, read on.

Oklahoma Birth and Death Record Indexes are now Online

oklahoma_deathOk2Explore is a free searchable index of births and deaths that occurred in the state of Oklahoma. Included is limited information on births occurring more than 20 years ago and deaths occurring more than 5 years ago. Visitors to the site may search the index using any combination of the subject’s name, date of event (birth or death), county of event, and sex of the subject.

Two Baby Boys are Twins, but an Italian Court Says They Aren’t Brothers

Try entering this into your genealogy database! Fifteen months ago in California, a surrogate mother gave birth to twin boys. The babies were the sons of a gay Italian couple who had used in vitro fertilization to have children. But when the two men returned to Milan with their newborns, a clerk at the registry office refused to transcribe the babies’ birth certificates, barring the men from registering the boys as their legal children.

Actually, that part isn’t news. After all, similar situations have occurred before. However, the Italian courts then issued a strange ruling: Despite being twins, the court said, the two boys aren’t brothers!

The Myth of Wearing White Gloves

whiteglovesArchivists and curators have long required the use of white cotton gloves for handling very old paper or old books, when the paper is brittle and threatens to crumble. In fact, on one episodes of the popular television series Who Do You Think You Are? the guests and even some of the experts shown in the program were criticized for not wearing cotton gloves when handling old documents. However, experts now say that the use of white gloves not only provides a false sense of security but even can induce more damage than handling the same documents with bare hands! On the other, um, hand, simple frequent washing and drying of the hands may be the better solution.

In an article that first appeared in the December 2005 issue of International Preservation News, conservation consultant Cathleen A. Baker and librarian Randy Silverman argued that for the handling of most types of materials, white gloves don’t help and actually may contribute to the damage. As they pointed out, handling books with gloves is apt to do more harm than good. Gloves are just as likely to be dirty as fingers, especially if they have been used a number of times previously and have already absorbed dirt and chemicals from previously-handled papers. Once absorbed into the cotton, dirt, abrasive grit, and chemicals are easily spread from one old document to another. Washing the gloves frequently is only a partial solution since chemicals from detergents are retained in the cotton fibers and then spread to documents handled later.

Dacuda – PocketScan Wireless Scanner

This might be the world’s smallest scanner. A genealogist could carry it in pocket or purse when visiting libraries or archives and make digital copies of documents, photographs, pages from books, or anything similar.

dacuda-pocketscan

Quoting from the advertising:

SCAN ON THE GO
Swipe this hand-held scanner over any text or image, and it sends a high-res image to your phone or tablet via Bluetooth.

Kids’ artwork, documents, recipes, or just a part of a page—all look much clearer than a pic from your phone, thanks to built-in illumination. Even artwork, large books, and other images that aren’t completely flat get scanned beautifully. That can’t happen on glass or with a camera.

(+) How to Use Evernote to be a Better Genealogist

The following is an update to a Plus Edition article I published several years ago. Some of the information has changed since the original article was published. I have updated the article and am re-publishing it today.

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

evernote_logoOne of my favorite computer tools is Evernote. I’ve been using it for more than six years now and love it. Sometimes I wonder how I ever got along before Evernote. While Evernote has many uses, I use it primarily as a digital filing system. In fact, I find that it is a perfect complement to almost any genealogy program, often compensating for the shortcomings of whatever genealogy program you might use to track your research.

Admittedly, all this didn’t happen overnight. When first installed, Evernote presents the new user with a blank screen. That user typically says, “Now what?” This article will hopefully answer that question.