Books

COSLA: eBook Feasibility Study for Public Libraries

Libraries everywhere are struggling as the world switches from printed books and magazines to e-publishing. Where do libraries fit into this brave new world?

A study by the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA) suggests that libraries can grow and thrive by focusing on eBooks. The study suggests that libraries need to anticipate this shift and become part of the eBook story. The study isn’t new, being published in 2010. However, I believe the information in the study hasn’t changed appreciably since then.

Specifically, the study states that libraries must:

Book Reviews: 6 Books by Joseph Lee Boyle

The following was written by Bobbi King, EOGN.com’s Book Review Editor:

Delaware Runaways, 1720-1783, “Very impudent when drunk or sober”

White Pennsylvania Runaways, 1763-1768, “much given to Liquor, and chewing Tobacco”

White Pennsylvania Runaways, 1769-1772, “much addicted to strong drink and swearing”

White Pennsylvania Runaways, 1773-1775, “much given to strong liquor, and low company”

White Pennsylvania Runaways, 1776-1783, “she snuffs, drinks and smokes”

By Joseph Lee Boyle. Published by the Genealogical Publishing Company.

Thousands of white Europeans did not come to the American colonies as free men and women. They were transported from Britain as indentured servants, political exiles, or convicts. In every colony, enslaved white persons preceded the engagement of black slaves long before the blacks arrived. Some were abducted to the colonies, some were runaways from impoverished homes selling themselves as servants, and some were exiles and vagabonds. White bound labor remained significant until the American Revolution.

Book Review: American Settlements and Migrations: A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

American Settlements and Migrations: A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians
by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck. Published by Genealogical Publishing Company. 2017. 108 pages.

This is a smallish book, indeed a primer, “any book of elementary principles.” This book reviews the population movements of the New England states and colonies as well as the western states and Pacific coast areas.

Primer is an easy read, but full of information. Chapters overview the settlements of:

Book Review: History for Genealogists

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

History for Genealogists
By Judy Jacobson. Published by Genealogical Publishing Co. 2016. 310 pages.

This is a timeline style of book.

Understanding the social setting of our historical families sets the stage for appreciating why they moved, why they married those particular people, and why they undertook those particular occupations and endeavors of their lives.

History covers chronologically the events for military battles and wars, disease epidemics, economic events, migration trails, politics, disasters, and other momentous happenings.

Book Review: The Family Tree Historical Newspapers Guide

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The Family Tree Historical Newspapers Guide
by James M. Beidler. Published by Family Tree Books, Cincinnati, OH. 2018. 239 pages.

This new Historical Newspapers Guide covers research in traditional newspapers and online newspaper sources.

Part One includes chapters on the history of newspapers, and information you’d expect to find:

  • The Historical Role of Newspapers
  • Records in Newspapers
  • Vital Records and Events in Newspapers
  • Obituaries and Other Death Notices
  • Understanding Newspaper Media

Book Review: The Acadian Miracle

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The Acadian Miracle
by Dudley J. Le Blanc, revised and edited by M.M. Le Blanc. Published by BizEntine Press. 2016. 392 pages.

Dudley Joseph Le Blanc (1894-1971), who continued to speak his ethnic Cajun French language for all his life, was a patent oil salesman (made him wealthy), an elected Louisiana state legislator and congressional U.S. senator, staunch advocate and defender of Acadian culture and history, and author, whose books celebrated the life of Acadian peoples and memorialized the forced Acadian Exile via his extensive personal research and publication of Acadian history.

The Acadian Miracle was published 50 years ago, in 1966. (An earlier book, The True Story of the Acadians, was previously reviewed in this newsletter). His granddaughter, M.M. Le Blanc, has taken the original manuscript and improved upon it, while maintaining original text, source material, and tone. This 50th Anniversary edition contains new content, added tables and charts, and appendices reorganized and revised. There are simple pencil drawings of people and events that illustrate the text, some maps, and tables with names.

A Personal Library Without Books

The subject of printed books and electronic books (or e-books) has been featured in numerous past articles in this newsletter. Therefore, I was interested today to see an online Associated Press article and video at https://yhoo.it/2C9Pg9d about numerous universities that are purging many printed books from their shelves. In many cases, the libraries simply don’t have the room for all the old books, and the idea of expanding libraries is subject to budget constraints. If they want to purchase new books, even printed publications, the libraries have to free up shelf space. Also, according to one 2009 study of libraries, between staffing, utility costs, and other expenses, it costs about $4 to keep a book on the shelf for a year.

Click here to see a video about universities purging dusty volumes

In one example at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, (yes, there really is an Indiana University of Pennsylvania, see https://www.iup.edu/ for details), nearly half of the university’s collection remained uncirculated for 20 years or more. Unused books obviously do no one any good.

An In-Brief Guide to New York Genealogy

A new research guide is now available as a PDF file. The following announcement was written by the folks at the In-Depth Genealogist Store:

IDG INTRODUCES THEIR NEWEST IN-BRIEF RESEARCH GUIDE:
“AN IN-BRIEF GUIDE TO NEW YORK GENEALOGY” BY LARRY NAUKAM

The In-Depth Genealogist (IDG) is pleased to present their newest in-brief research guide in the research series by writer, Larry Naukam, entitled “An In-Brief Guide to New York Genealogy”. Larry writes the column “Doing it Ourselves” for The In-Depth Genealogist’s digital magazine, Going In-Depth. Larry holds degrees in Geography, Library Science, and Divinity. For more than 30 years he has worked in libraries and information centers, using various techniques and technologies to enhance access to historical materials. As technologies have developed he has used them to make collections more accessible for students and researchers.

Newest In-Brief Research Guide: “Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure” by Christine Woodcock

The following announcement was written by the folks at the In-Depth Genealogist:

IDG Introduces their Newest In-Brief Research Guide:

“Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure” By Christine Woodcock

The In-Depth Genealogist (IDG) is pleased to present their newest in-brief research guide in the research series by writer, Christine Woodcock, entitled “An In-Brief Guide to Turning Your Family Tree into a Family Treasure”. Christine wrote the column “In Search of Your Scottish Roots” for The In-Depth Genealogist’s digital magazine, Going In-Depth. Scottish born, Canadian raised, she is a genealogy educator with an expertise in Scottish records. She enjoys sharing new resources to assist others in their quest to find and document their heritage. Christine is also a lecturer, author and blogger. She is the Director of Genealogy Tours of Scotland and enjoys taking fellow Scots “home” to do onsite genealogy research and to discover their own Scottish heritage.

Book Review: The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, 4th Edition

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy
4th Edition. By Val D. Greenwood. Genealogical Publishing Co. 2017. 778 pages.

It’s nice to see this well-worn genealogical classic refreshed and reprinted. It’s held its worth and value nicely, and this most recent volume has been updated with pertinent information for researching today’s resources. The 3rd edition came out in 2000, so this 2017 edition encompasses significant updates.

The most obvious difference is the abundance of URLs throughout the book. Wherever there’s an opportunity for a researcher to go online and learn more about a topic, Mr. Greenwood includes the link. In rewriting his book, he regrets the opportunities for inaccuracies due to rapid changes of links and website addresses, a testament to his desire to write the most up-to-date volume possible. This from the man, who, in 1972, used an IBM Executive typewriter to type 535 pages, including all the charts, tables, and illustration, twice, to prepare camera-ready copy.

Book Review: In Search of a Fair Wind – The Sea Letters of Georgia Townsend Yates, 1891-1892

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

In Search of a Fair Wind
The Sea Letters of Georgia Townsend Yates, 1891-1892
By Georgia Townsend Yates and Clint Cargile.
Zea Mays Publ., Sycamore, Ill. 2017. 229 pages.

I find memoirs to be extraordinarily engaging, even when the central topic is of no great interest to me.

Being pulled into someone else’s life, reading the private thoughts, feelings, perspective, reactions to family, fears, insecurities, being privy to someone who has had a life different from mine, and shares it so unpretentiously, feels like a privilege.

Georgia Townsend Yates wrote letters home to her mother from the Willie Reed, an ocean vessel that sailed from the East Coast to Japan and Singapore from 1891 to 1892. Captain John Elvin Yates, Georgia’s husband, commanded the ship, and she sailed with him for fifteen months, accompanied by their toddler daughter Dorothy.

Where to Download Thousands of Free eBooks

It would be a stretch to say this article relates to genealogy; however, I have found that many genealogists are also avid readers with a broad range of literary interests. With this in mind, I thought I would share some ideas for those times when you want to enjoy reading a good book on a different subject.

Did you know you can obtain thousands of free ebooks to read online, download to your computer, or transfer to your Kindle, iPad, or other ebook reader?

Many of the available ebooks are electronic versions of classic literature. In other words, they are old books and are out of copyright. However, mixed in with these are quite a few more modern books where copyright permission has been obtained.

Most of these books can be read on a Kindle, iPad, or Nook, as well as on the screen of any Windows, Macintosh, Chromebook, or Linux computer. This is a great way to obtain a lot of reading material.

Check out these web sites:

4th edition of the Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy is now Available

Val D. Greenwood is one of the best-known and most respected genealogy authors of our time. His book, the Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, is one of the best “how to” manuals for beginning genealogists and advanced researchers alike. It is the text of choice in colleges and universities or wherever courses in American genealogy are taught.

The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy identifies the various classes of records employed in that research, groups them in convenient tables and charts, gives their location, explains their uses, and evaluates each of them in the context of the research process.

“The challenge I give to the genealogist is to reach beyond the vital statistics to a new world of understanding, both of his ancestors and of himself. . . . Someone has said that there is little point in digging up an ancestor if you are not going to make him live”– Val D. Greenwood

Val has updated his classic work and the 4th edition of the Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy is now available from the publisher, Genealogical Publishing Company, at: http://bit.ly/2jEAnse as well as from other genealogy bookstores.

Book Review: Take Control of Your Digital Legacy

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

Take Control of Your Digital Legacy
By Joe Kissell. An ebook, published at TidBITS Publishing, Inc., 2017. 127 pages.

At my age, those disagreeable, irksome end-of-life medical, financial, and genealogy issues raise their ugly heads. I dutifully pay attention to them for awhile, but after a time, I stop dealing about them and go back to working on more of the fun stuff. But I have to say, it never, ever, occurred to me that I needed to consider the legacy of my personal digital life.

You know, Facebook, LinkedIn, My Heritage, Ancestry, it’s quite a list once you make it. My personal computer, my genealogy software, my photo files, my research files, my subscriptions, my email accounts; what was paper in the 20th century is digital in the 21st century. And it still needs to be dealt with, if I want any of it to survive outside a Dell. My decades of photos, research, and genealogy reside in what my kids will see as a hard, gray laptop containing nothing they’re interested in. They will never open it, unless I convince them to care about what’s in it.

Book Review: The True Story of the Acadians

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

The True Story of the Acadians
By Dudley J. Le Blanc.
A reprint by M.M. Le Blanc .
BizEntine Press. August 2016. 271 pages.

Recently, I visited and marveled at the rugged coastline and forested beauty of Acadia National Park. Located in the northeastern region of the native state of our well-regarded Mr. Eastman, in Maine, Acadia National Park is where the rays of the rising morning sun, in the winter months, first reach the United States, striking the peak and a few shivering souls atop Mt. Cadillac.

The word ‘Acadia’ sparked a memory of a poem I had read in elementary school, “Evangeline” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The poet eulogized the young Acadian woman Evangeline’s loss and lifelong search for her love Gabriel. The poem memorializes the actual events of the forced banishment of Acadian peoples by the English to their southern New England colonies.

Not that many miles away and to the east and north of Acadia National Park, is the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. There is Acadia.

Did You Know That You Can Borrow Books From Internet Archive?

Sure, you can read books that are out of copyright on Archive.org or even download the same books and save them to a hard drive or a flash drive. But did you know that you can even borrow current books that are still within copyright?

Books in the Archive.org collection may be borrowed by logged in patrons for a period of two weeks. Internet Archive offers borrowable books in BookReader, PDF and ePub formats. BookReader editions also may be read online immediately in any web browser.

Diane L Richard describes how to borrow newer books from Archive.org in an article in the NGS Blog at: http://upfront.ngsgenealogy.org/2017/10/did-you-know-that-you-can-borrow-books.html

Announcing Unlock the Past Handy Guides

The following announcement was written by the folks at Unlock the Past, a division of Gould Genealogy:

Adelaide, South Australia, 18 October 2017 – history and genealogy company, Unlock the Past, has launched a new series of handy guides to add to its popular guide books series. These are low cost A4 four-page guides on quality heavy card stock, concise, but packed full of key facts and clear information – intended for handy reference.

The series has launched with six titles from well known genealogists and Unlock the Past presenters and authors, Kerry Farmer, Eric Kopittke and Chris Paton. Current titles are listed at bit.ly/handy-guides.

They are priced at AU$5 (US$4 and £3) — for ready sale by authors themselves, societies and other resellers. Ebook editions are available for AU$3.95 from www.gen-ebooks.com. The range of titles is expected to grow considerably in coming months.

We welcome:

The Internet Archive Now Claims that Libraries may Legally Scan, Digitize, and Republish Books from 1923 to 1941

For many years, genealogists have believed that all books published in the U.S. prior to 1923 are now public domain, meaning those books can legally be copied and sold. Anything published in 1923 or later might be under copyright. The keyword here is “might.” The subject became a bit complicated starting in 1923. I wrote about that in an earlier Plus Edition article that is still available at: http://eogn.com/wp/?p=41410. (A Plus Edition user name and password is required in order to read that article.)

Now the folks at the highly-respected Internet Archive have made a claim that Section 108h of the U.S. Copyright laws are even less restrictive, at least for libraries. That may not be the same as for private individuals, however. Here is a brief quote from the statement:

A Dictionary of Occupational Terms Based on the Classification of Occupations used in the Census of Population [for Great Britain], 1921.

A Dictionary of Occupational Terms Based on the Classification of Occupations used in the Census of Population, 1921 was published in 1927 and, as the full title indicates, it was based on the classification of occupations used in the 1921 UK census. It obviously is a great resource when tracing ancestry in Great Britain. However, many of the occupations listed in this book also were commonly used in all the other English-speaking countries so the use of this reference book is not limited to only the “mother country.”

Originally published as a printed book, the Dictionary of Occupational Terms is by far the most comprehensive dictionary of British occupations, with almost 30,000 terms, and includes (sometimes very detailed) descriptions of the activities that each occupation involves.

A Dictionary of Occupational Terms Based on the Classification of Occupations used in the Census of Population, 1921 is extremely rare. In the British Isles, copies are available in only three of the six legal deposit libraries, four university libraries, two public libraries, and the London Library. The UK National Archives has two copies, one in the document collection and one on the shelves in the Research & Enquiries Room. Copies occasionally surface in the second-hand book trade.

Free Guide to DNA Testing

Richard Hill has written a genealogist’s Guide to DNA Testing. Best of all, the Guide is available free of change from now through September 2 as a Kindle ebook from Amazon. The ebook will revert to its normal price on September 3, 2017.

NOTE: Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers. You can read Kindle format ebooks on Kindle devices as well as on iPads, iPhones, Android phones and tablets, Windows, Macintosh, and in any sort if computer that can open a web browser and use the Kindle Cloud Reader. For more information about reading Kindle ebooks on non-Kindle devices, see my earlier article at: http://bit.ly/2xvLx4Z.

Richard Hill’s Guide to DNA Testing is now available as version 3, updated to cover new tests and additional information. The Guide is intended to be a short, easy-to-understand introduction for people who aren’t yet interested enough to devote more time to the subject. Links to longer books and many other resources are useful to anyone.