Film/Photos

E-Z Photo Scan at RootsTech

A sign at the E-Z Scan booth

A sign at the E-Z Scan booth

One of the exhibitors at RootsTech was E-Z Photo Scan. The company invited all attendees to bring their family pictures, documents, and any memorabilia that can be digitized, for free scanning on site. I took advantage of the offer and brought along about four dozen old family photographs from the 1890s and early 1900s.

For pictures, the company used Kodak Picture Saver Scanning Systems photo scanners, models PS50 & PS80. Using other hardware, the operation was able to digitize slides as well as pictures and printed documents, including books. The photo scanners can digitize up to 85 photos per minute (that’s fast!) and also can double as a scanner for treasured documents, too. The slide scanner can digitize up to 15 slides per minute. A film scanner was also available.

Images digitized by E-Z Photo Scan can be saved in a number of different file formats or even saved directly to your smartphone. It also can load scanned photos directly into FamilySearch.org. In fact, another service center, called the Scannx Photo ScanCenter, was installed recently at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

Newsletter reader Mina Robbins scans many of her family photographs at the E-Z Scan booth.

Newsletter reader Mina Robbins scans many of her family photographs at the E-Z Scan booth.

Saturday, October 18, is Home Movie Day

Do you have old home movies created by familiar members some years ago? If so, mark this date on your calendar: October 18, 2014.

Shot on 8 mm, Super 8, and 16 mm film, the movies often contain cherished family memories and invaluable social and historical images, but few people have the equipment to view them. Fewer still know how to maintain them for future generations.

If you do not see the video above on your screen, you can watch it at: http://vimeo.com/103197932.

According to the Center for Home Movies’ web site: Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and filmmaking held annually at many local venues worldwide. Home Movie Day events provide the opportunity for individuals and families to see and share their own home movies with an audience of their community, and to see their neighbors’ in turn. It’s a chance to discover why to care about these films and to learn how best to care for them. Home Movie Day is a celebration of amateur films and filmmaking held annually at many local venues worldwide. Home Movie Day events provide the opportunity for individuals and families to see and share their own home movies with an audience of their community, and to see their neighbors’ in turn. It’s a chance to discover why to care about these films and to learn how best to care for them.”

Documentary Depicts History of the Cajuns

The Story Of The Cajuns

The Story Of The Cajuns

A Cajun film, seven years in the making, will premier in Louisiana this month in New Orleans and throughout Acadiana. It is also available on a DVD disk.

In The Story Of The Cajuns – Part I, film makers Brenda Jepson and Dr. Francoise Paradis interview Cajuns from all walks of life – from a shrimp fisherman to a college professor and from a cowboy to an Acadian artist. The film tells the story of how Acadians expelled during the Deportation made the arduous journey, some of them via France, to their new home in Louisiana. It explores the hardships they faced and reveals how they survived and thrived in a climate so different from their ancestral Acadie. The documentary was filmed in France, Canada and Maine.

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