Genealogy Basics

Are You A “Trash Genealogist”?

NOTE: I originally published this article in this newsletter in 1998. Yet it is still a problem today. It surfaced again in an email message I received today from a newsletter reader. I receive similar messages most every week from concerned genealogists who don’t like to see online “fairy tales” in user-contributed information that is published in genealogy web sites. I expect to re-publish this article every year or two until the problem is solved. (I don’t expect it to be solved during my lifetime, however.)

While I am ranting and raving about genealogy home pages, I’ll describe another “problem.” This problem has existed for hundreds of years on paper. In more recent years the problem has spread to the International Genealogical Index, the Ancestral File and, more recently, to many CD-ROM disks containing collections of family trees submitted by some company’s customers. However, the recent proliferation of personal web pages has magnified the issue still further.

I can go to almost any Internet search engine today and within a very few minutes find hundreds of “genealogy fairy tales” online. I can find claims of births in Massachusetts or Virginia in the 1500s or in Utah in the 1700s. Time and time again, I see claims that a girl gave birth at the age of three or perhaps at the age of seventy-three. Twelve-year-old fathers also are common in online genealogy home pages. Doesn’t anyone ever check this stuff?

Learn More About Your Ancestors by Having Their Handwriting Analyzed

The following article was written by Jean Maguire, describing a recent presentation by Kathi McKnight at the Colorado Genealogical Society. This article is republished here with Jean’s permission:

Colorado Genealogical Society welcomes
Kathi McKnight, Hand Writing Expert
October 21, 2017
By Jean Maguire

My interest in hand writing analysis began when I was accused of stealing narcotic drugs while a nurse at Swedish Hospital. Drugs were missing from the pharmacy and the drug cart and signed out with my name. Since my name was all over charts and medication records, it was easy to copy my signature. Quietly, a wonderful person in human resources began checking my handwriting and other nurses on my floor. My handwriting did not match and the drug addict was apprehended and sent to rehab.

Handwriting analysis has been used since Aristotle. Eighty percent of companies in Europe and many Fortune 500 companies use it. Kathi McKnight is a Master Certified Graphologist; author of three books; and has analyzed thousands of documents since 1991. She is the go to person for TV shows; Dr. Oz; Washington Post; Sports Illustrated and many more.

Kathi let us know each of us has different handwriting, even though we were all taught in the same method. Handwriting analysis does not predict the future; does not tell age; does not tell sex, or reveal left or right handwriting. Even people with disabilities have different handwriting because handwriting comes from the brain and not from the hands.

Why You’re Probably Related to Nefertiti, Confucius, and Socrates … and Most Everyone Else

An article by Stephen Johnson in the BigThink web site states:

Nefertiti

“The theory of evolution holds that all living things have common ancestors. But just how far back do humans need to go to find a common ancestor of their own: a person to whom all living people are related?

“The answer, for people of European descent at least, is surprisingly recent: 600 years. The common ancestor for every single person alive on the planet today, no matter where, lived approximately 3,600 years ago. That means Confucius, Nefertiti, Socrates, and any figure from ancient history that had children, is in some way your ancestor.”

How to Transfer Cassette Tapes to a Computer for Long-Term Preservation

A newsletter reader wrote to me recently, asking:

“I am in the process of backing up my family/genealogy records. There is a lot of information available about commercial services transfer of information. However, I am not seeing much about transfer of audiotapes to more stable backup. Have you written any articles or know of sources to help me evaluate commercial services for audiotapes?”

My answer is:

Genealogy Data Entry Techniques

In the course of a week, I get to see a lot of genealogy data. Some of what I see is abysmal. Many otherwise highly-skilled genealogists do not seem to know that their keyboards have a SHIFT key! Instead, they simply turn on CAPS LOCK and then ignore upper and lower case after that.

Of course, the use of UPPER CASE text has a long history in the computer business. The mainframes of the 1960s and 70s only used upper case text. Data typically was entered on 80-column punch cards. The IBM 026 keypunch machine, the most popular keypunch machine ever built, indeed did not have a shift key and was incapable of entering lower case text.

By the late 1970s, all of this had changed, and data was being entered from computer terminals in normal upper and lower case. However, not everyone got the word. It seems that a number of people do not realize that the keyboards of the twenty-first century have improved since those “stone age” computers of 40 or 50 years ago.

Here are two short examples produced by a popular genealogy program. Which one do you find easier to read?

It is the First Day of the Month: Back Up Your Genealogy Files

BackUpYourGenealogyFilesIt is the first day of the month. It’s time to back up your genealogy files. Then test your backups!

Actually, you can make backups at any time. However, it is easier and safer if you have a specific schedule. The first day of the month is easy to remember, so I would suggest you back up your genealogy files at least on the first day of every month, if not more often.

Using the U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules

Almost all experienced genealogists have used the census records to find ancestors. However, how many of us have used the Census Mortality Schedules? In fact, I have to wonder how many of us even know what the U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules are? And why would we find them to be valuable?

In 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, 1890, and 1900, the U.S. census enumerators were required to collect all the normal census information plus even more: information about all persons dying within the 12 months preceding the census taking. These lists are known as the “Mortality Schedules”.

Mortality data can prove very useful in your research. For instance, for several years I suspected that a man found in the Massachusetts census records was my great-great-grandfather. I hadn’t found proof, but the circumstantial evidence was almost overwhelming: he had the correct name, lived in the same area that my later, proven ancestors lived, had the correct number of children as mentioned in a family history book, and more. In fact, I really wanted to prove my descent from this Revolutionary War soldier who spent the winter at Valley Forge in the Continental Army under the command of George Washington. (Most Revolutionary soldiers served in the militia, not in the Continental Army.) I searched hard for the proof.

How to Save a Webpage as a PDF File, So You Later Can View It Offline

Ever find a web page that you want to save, perhaps as a PDF file? (I do that frequently.) An article by Tyler Lacoma in the Digital Trends web site tells exactly how to do that in a variety of different web browsers on Windows, Macintosh, Android, and Apple iOS (iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch). If you have an interest, you can find the instructions at: http://bit.ly/2zdTm2O.

Who Actually Owns Your Content When You Post It to the Web?

Over the years, I have heard or read many comments from genealogists about who owns information posted to the World Wide Web. In fact, many people are reluctant to post their family trees online because “someone might steal the information.” A short article published in the Gizmodo.com Web site uses non-lawyer English to explain several of the issues concerning legal “ownership” of information posted online.

If you have concerns about ownership of online information, you might want to read Who Actually Owns Your Content When You Post It to the Web by David Nield at http://bit.ly/2ypjoQU.

I will offer one thought to keep in mind: names of people, along with dates and places of birth, marriage, death, military service, and similar facts of interest to genealogists are just that: facts. As stated in the article by David Nield, “You can’t copyright facts, or ideas, or systems…” While you might be in possession of certain facts about your ancestors, that doesn’t mean that you OWN the information. No one person “owns” facts within the U.S., according to copyright law.

It is the First Day of the Month: Back Up Your Genealogy Files

BackUpYourGenealogyFilesIt is the first day of the month. It’s time to back up your genealogy files. Then test your backups!

Actually, you can make backups at any time. However, it is easier and safer if you have a specific schedule. The first day of the month is easy to remember, so I would suggest you back up your genealogy files at least on the first day of every month, if not more often.

Residential Genealogy Online

Would you like to know who lived in your home many years ago? Or perhaps you want to find the home of your ancestors in the 19th century. One online site can help. Historic Map Works has unveiled a way to link people and places throughout history.

Historic Map Works is a collection of 19th and early 20th century city, town, and county maps. The detailed maps usually show every building and every street in each city or town. Each single-dwelling home contains the name of the family who resided there, either on or beside the building on the map. Apartment complexes contained the property owner’s name.

The new site should be of interest to history buffs, genealogy searchers, and real estate agents. Can you imagine the realtor listing the details of a family that used to live in the house being offered for sale? I suspect that amount of detail might increase the sale price!

It is the First Day of the Month: Back Up Your Genealogy Files

BackUpYourGenealogyFilesIt is the first day of the month. It’s time to back up your genealogy files. Then test your backups!

Actually, you can make backups at any time. However, it is easier and safer if you have a specific schedule. The first day of the month is easy to remember, so I would suggest you back up your genealogy files at least on the first day of every month, if not more often.

Hurricanes and Your Genealogy Data

The recent Hurricane Harvey, the present Hurricane Irma, and Hurricane Jose presently in tropical waters that might head northward all bring to mind questions, such as “How do I protect my personal belongings and information?”

I cannot speak to protecting belongings. However, I have written many times about preserving personal genealogy information that perhaps you spent years accumulating. The same procedures will also protect your family documents, insurance policies, photographs, and much more of the paper we all accumulate.

Many of the people who live through hurricanes will lose all paper documentation of their existence. Some cannot even not prove they ever lived. This is where going paperless can help.

Deciphering Colonial-Era Handwritten Documents

The State Archives of North Carolina blog has published a three-part series on how to interpret Colonial-era handwriting. The series includes a brief history of writing during this time period, characteristics of 17th and 18th century British-American handwriting, and some tips on deciphering the text found within these records.

The information contained will help anyone researching ancestors or history the British Isles, anywhere in the American colonies, Canada, or other English-speaking countries and colonies.

It is the First Day of the Month: Back Up Your Genealogy Files

BackUpYourGenealogyFilesIt is the first day of the month. It’s time to back up your genealogy files. Then test your backups!

Actually, you can make backups at any time. However, it is easier and safer if you have a specific schedule. The first day of the month is easy to remember, so I would suggest you back up your genealogy files at least on the first day of every month, if not more often.

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of August 23, 2017

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

SALT LAKE CITY, UT—This week over 8 million new records from the Netherlands were added and millions more from Denmark and England! Search these new free records and new records from Belgium, BillionGraves, Chile, Kansas, Liberia, Louisiana, Ohio, South Africa, and Sweden at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Genealogy’s Often-Misspelled Words

You might want to save this article someplace. I have no idea why, but many of the words used in researching your family tree are difficult to spell. I constantly see spelling errors in messages posted on various genealogy web sites. When someone misspells a word, it feels like they are shouting, “I don’t know what I’m doing!”

Here are a few words to memorize:

Genealogy – No, it is not spelled “geneology” nor is it spelled in the manner I often see: “geneaology.” That last word looks to me as if someone thought, “Just throw all the letters in there and hope that something sticks.” For some reason, many newspaper reporters and their editors do not know how to spell this word. Don’t they have spell checkers?

Turn Your Phone into a Document Scanner for Free

Rick Broida, author of the Cheapskate Blog, has an article today that will interest many genealogists. He describes using software that will turn your “smartphone” into the equivalent of a desktop scanner. It works well for digitizing one side of one piece of paper at a time. It isn’t so convenient when digitizing both sides of multi-page documents although that can still be accomplished by using additional software to merge the pages together after scanning.

Actually, I have been doing exactly what Rick describes for years and have had very good experiences with using my cell phone as a substitute scanner. I use it in genealogy libraries, archives, or for digitizing receipts, eyeglass prescriptions, business cards, and most anything else that is worth saving. I agree with Rick’s experiences.

Most Common Last Names in the US

For centuries, immigrants have come to the U.S. to escape war, oppression, and poverty, or to pursue employment opportunities and success. Most Americans can trace their roots to immigrant ancestors. 24/7 Wall St. reviewed census data to find the 50 most common last names in the U.S.

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