Online Sites

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of October 16, 2017

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

Summary

Over 40 million new records this week from Finland, Italy, and the Netherlands. Additional records were published from Argentina, Australia, Austria, BillionGraves, Chile, China, Denmark, England, France, Hungary,Massachusetts, South Africa, Spain, and West Virginia. Search these new free records at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

OK, so it is not Friday. Actually, Findmypast sent this announcement last Friday but I was in Beijing, China at the time and didn’t get an opportunity to publish it until today. The following was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 2.8 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

London, Docklands and East End Baptisms, 1558-1933

Over 40,000 records covering the parishes St John Wapping, St Leonard Bromley, St Mary Bow & St Mary Whitechapel have been added to our collection of London, Docklands and East End Baptisms. The collection now contains over 783,000 records from 29 East End Parishes. Each record consists of a transcript created by Docklands Ancestors that will reveal your ancestors birth date, baptism date, parent’s names, address and the location of their baptism.

London, Docklands and East End Marriages, 1558-1859

More Digitized Montana Newspapers are now Available Online

The following announcement was written by the Montana Historical Society:

The Montana Historical Society is pleased to announce that new content is available to search and browse on the web site MONTANA NEWSPAPERS.

The Mineral County Museum and Historical Society in Superior, Montana has sponsored a project digitizing an additional 10 years of The Mineral Independent. With this extension, The Mineral Independent is now available from June 1915 through December 1932.

MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, a service of the Montana Historical Society, is freely accessible to all Internet users; no subscriptions or fees are required. To learn about having your local newspaper digitized, contact us at MHSDigital@mt.gov.

Thousands of U.K. Catholic Records to Become Available in a New Online Database

Thousands of Catholic records will become available in a new database. However, the date it will appear online has not yet been announced. According to an article in Who Do You Think You Are Magazine:

“A new database listing over a quarter of a million English Roman Catholics has been created by the Catholic Family History Society (CFHS). The Margaret Higgins Database is compiled by an Australian monk, Brother Rory Higgins FSC, and named after his mother. It holds indexed records of 275,000 people living between 1607 and 1840.”

At various times, Catholics were forbidden from voting, joining the army or standing for Parliament, and their rights to own property were severely limited. However, between 1778 and 1829 a series of Roman Catholic Relief Acts introduced greater civil rights.

Reclaim the Records adds New Jersey Marriage Index, 1901-2016 to its Online Database

The following announcement was written by the folks at Reclaim the Records:

Hello again, from your favorite open records activists at Reclaim The Records! Do you remember how at the end of our last newsletter we promised you 116 years of brand new records, coming soon to a computer near you? Well, we might have made a tiny mistake, because we stink at math. It’s only 115 years. And here they are!

New Jersey Marriage Index
Introducing the NEW JERSEY MARRIAGE INDEX, 1901-2016! These records are now totally digital, and totally free — forever! Now you can research anyone who got married in the Garden State right from your home, still in your pajamas.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 609,000 new additions available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Warwickshire bastardy indexes

Containing over 5,000 records, the Warwickshire bastardy indexes consists of an assortment of bastardy applications, registers, returns and appeals spanning the years 1844 to 1914. ‘Bastard’ was a contemporary term which meant a child born outside of marriage. Bastardy records were created to establish who is responsible for the financial maintenance of illegitimate children. At the time of these records, bastardy cases were held in the petty session. Mothers could ask the court for an order against the child’s father to provide child maintenance. It was the mother’s responsibility to provide evidence of the paternity. This could be in the form of witness statements about the individuals’ relationship. Fathers were to pay the maintenance under threat of imprisonment.

Each record provides the name of the mother, and most records include the name of the putative father. The putative father is the individual who is alleged to be the father of the child. The records do not contain the name of the child.

Berkshire Baptism Index

TheGenealogist Expands their Parish Record Collection with the Addition of 2.2 Million Individuals for Somerset & Dorset

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has released Baptism records for Somerset covering the years 1538 – 1996, along with Burial and Crematorium records for Somerset & Dorset covering 1563 – 2003. In association with Somerset & Dorset FHS, these new records cover hundreds of parishes for the counties.

Somerset and Dorset Family History Society worked with TheGenealogist to publish their records online, making over 2.2 million individuals from baptism and burial records fully searchable. Ann-Marie Wilkinson, the Chair of Somerset and Dorset FHS said:

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 3. 2 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

Connecticut Baptisms, 1600s-1800s

Connecticut Baptisms contains over 41,000 records covering the towns of Coventry, East Hampton, Mansfield, New Haven, Norfolk, Norwich, Simsbury, Windsor, and Woodstock. Each record includes a transcripts that will reveal your ancestor’s birth year, baptism place, baptism date and parent’s names.

Connecticut Church Records, 1600s-1800s

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of September 25, 2017

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

Summary

Good news to those with South Africa roots–over 1 million free images of historic records were published this weekMany more were published from AustraliaAustriaEnglandFind A GraveFranceIrelandItalyParaguay, and Peru! Search these new free records at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Update to IGRS Early Irish Birth, Marriage & Death Indexes

The following announcement was written by the folks at the Irish Genealogical Research Society:

The Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS) has added a further 5,000 records to the Society’s Early Irish Birth, Marriage and Death Indexes. This brings the total number of names to almost 260,000.

This latest update means the Society’s exclusive collection of lesser used and obscure sources for Irish births, marriages and deaths now comprises a total of 24,500 births (noting 47,800 names), 83,600 marriages (186,800 names) and 16,800 deaths (24,500 names). The total number of names is 259,500.

This particular update draws from a range of material: surviving 19th century census records; marriage licence indexes; pre-1922 abstracts from exchequer and chancery court records; memorial inscriptions; biographical notices from newspapers; a large number of long forgotten published works on particular families and places; and memorials from Ireland’s Registry of Deeds.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 753,000 new records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Dublin Electoral Rolls

Containing more than 427,000 transcripts, this index pertains to records found on the Dublin City Library & Archive website. The rolls are broken up into four divisions: College Green, Dublin Harbour, St Stephens Green, and St Patricks. The original documents have been digitised by Dublin City Council, which aims to digitise the entirety of their electoral rolls, spanning from 1898 to 1916. Additional information, including images, can be found on the source’s website.

TheGenealogist adds over 1.1 Million Records to their Sussex Parish Record Collection

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has added over 1.1 million individuals to its parish record collection covering the county of Sussex. Published In association with The Parish Record Transcription Society, this first tranche of records will be followed by more releases in the near future.

This new release covers individual records of:

  • 717,000 Baptisms
  • 213,000 Marriages
  • 208,000 Burials

The Parish Record Transcription Society (PRTSoc) have worked with TheGenealogist and S&N to publish their records online, making over 1.1 million individuals from baptism, marriage and burial records fully searchable:

How Your Ancestors Could Have Been Convicts Transported to Australia

A new free-to-use website of convict records going back two centuries is launched in Liverpool, England. From an article by Bill Gleeson in The Echo:

“A new website will allow genealogists and family historians to discover the fate of ancestors convicted of crimes and transported overseas.

“The free-to-use website draws on over 4m court records and uncovers how punishment affected the lives of tens of thousands of people convicted of crimes at the Old Bailey between 1780 and 1925. The project to create the website was led by academics at The University of Liverpool.

“The records reveal a vast amount of information, such as the names, year and place of birth, previous offences, height, eye colour and whether the convict could read or write. The records also show details of the crimes, who pressed the charges, and, if they were transported, the name of the ship and the penal colony to which they were sent.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 650,000 new records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

Herefordshire Baptisms

Herefordshire Baptisms contains over 229,000 transcripts of original parish baptism registers. The collection dates back to the early 1500s and covers more than 240 parishes across the county. Some of the records have been created by the Leintwardine History Society from original documents and the rest come from FamilySearch’s International Genealogical Index. Early records, especially from the 16th and 17th centuries, noted only a few facts about the event. Later records will include more biographical details. Most will reveal your ancestor’s name, birth year, residence, baptism date, baptism place and parent’s names.

Herefordshire Marriages

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of September 12, 2017

This week, millions of new records are available from the Netherlands and Denmark. Many more are available from BillionGravesEnglandFrench PolynesiaLuxembourgNicaraguaParaguay, and Peru, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, the United States, and Venezuela! Search these new free records at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Norwich Freemen Records since 1317 to Become Available Online

A new online database lists the names of every freeman in Norwich, a city on the River Wensum in East Anglia, England, that is approximately 100 miles (161 km) north-east of London.

Called the Freemen Registers, these records are an important resource for historians and those tracing their family history of those who lived and worked in Norwich. starting with Walter Fleighe, a butcher, in 1317. The oldest register, the Old Free Book, dates from 1317 to 1548. It was followed by the second register from 1548 to 1713, the third from 1713 to 1752 and so on until the present day.

What is a Freeman?

Ontario Genealogical Society to Operate CanadianHeadstones.com

The following announcement was written by Jim McKane:

Jim McKane, founder and president of CanadianHeadstones.com is pleased to announce that the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) has agreed to assume responsibility for the operation of the corporation and its namesake website, www.CanadianHeadstones.com to ensure the continuation and growth of Canada’s premier collection of headstone photographs and transcriptions, together with its sister sites www.ObituaryNetwork.org, www.OldFamilyPhotos.ca, http://GenDexNetwork.org/ and http://CHFamilyTrees.com/.

New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

NOTE: This announcement was released Friday, September 8. I am late in publishing it because I spent all day Friday flying from Boston to Los Angeles to attend a 2-hour meeting and then flew back again. I wasn’t online very much on Friday. (Yes, it is a heck of a commute and I don’t recommend it for anyone else.)

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 1.3 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

Lancashire wills & probate 1457-1858

Lancashire wills & probate 1457-1858 is an index of more than 229,000 Lancashire records that will enable you to determine whether your ancestor’s probate papers have survived through the centuries. Until 1857, the Church of England was responsible for administering wills and probate cases. These wills would have been proved in ecclesiastic courts. The collection covers the Amounderness, Copeland, Furness, Kendal, and Lonsdale deaneries and has been created by both Findmypast, which transcribed original records from the Lancashire Record Office, and the Lancashire and Cheshire Record Society, which provided index work. Records consist of both transcripts and scanned image of original documents that will provide you details about the type of material available, the probate year, your ancestor’s occupation and residence. A number of images also include additional notes.

New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 160,000 records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Oxfordshire marriage bonds 1634-1849

Search more than 46,000 records to discover when, where and to whom your Oxfordshire ancestor was married. Marriage bonds were made as an assurance that no legal impediment existed to prevent a marriage taking place. This was required when a couple chose to marry by licence instead of by banns. While the reading of the banns allowed for individuals to come forward with legal objections to the intended marriage before it had taken place, bonds served as a replacement means of assurance. A marriage bond would only need to be paid out if it was discovered that there was a legal reason the couple should not have been married. The licence would be given to the minister officiating the marriage, and the bond would be given to the Archdeacon’s office.

Britain, marriage licences Browse

WikiTree Hosts Second Annual Source-a-Thon

The following announcement was written by the folks at WikiTree:

Genealogy community donates $4,600 in prizes

September 1, 2017: Today WikiTree is opening registration for the second annual “Source-a-Thon,” a three-day genealogical sourcing marathon. The event starts on the morning of September 30 and ends at midnight on Monday, October 2. It is timed to coincide with the start of Family History Month in October.

The Source-a-Thon highlights the importance of citing sources for good genealogy. Inexperienced genealogists don’t always record their sources, or their tree has been handed down to them. Second-hand family history deserves to be preserved and shared, but it needs to be verified. Currently, 220,000 person profiles on WikiTree’s 15-million person tree have been identified as needing independent verification.

In the Source-a-Thon, hundreds of genealogists will be working side-by-side — in teams such as the Kiwi Crew, Team Australia, GB Gen, and the Southern Sourcers — to add sources to as many profiles as possible.