Online Sites

TheGenealogist Releases Half a Million Criminal Records adding Significantly to its Court & Criminal Collection

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has enlarged its Court & Criminal Records collection so that even more black sheep ancestors can now be searched for and found on its site. With a new release of records you can unearth all sorts of ancestors who came up against the law – whether they were a victim, acquitted, convicted of a minor offence or found guilty of a major crime such as murder.

These fully searchable records cover HO77 – The Home Office: Criminal Registers, England and Wales and ADM 6 – The Registers of Convicts in Prison Hulks Cumberland, Dolphin and Ganymede with indexes from The National Archives.

Ontario Métis Root Ancestors Project is now Completed and Online

The Métis Nation of Ontario has announced the completion of the Ontario Métis Root Ancestors Project.

NOTE: The Métis in Canada are a group of peoples in Canada who trace their descent to First Nations peoples and European settlers. Wikipedia describes the Métis as “the mixed-race descendants of early unions between First Nations people and colonial-era European settlers (usually indigenous women and settler men), within generations (particularly in central and western Canada, but also in the Eastern parts of Canada).” The early mothers were usually Mi’kmaq, Algonquin, Saulteaux, Cree, Ojibwe, Menominee, or Maliseet, or of mixed descent from these peoples.

The Project—which included the review and compilation of well over 100,000 historical records—identifies hundreds of Métis Root Ancestors from well-recognized historic Métis communities within Ontario. The Project took over five years to complete and now represents the largest collection of publicly available genealogical information on Ontario Métis.

New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

There are over 7.1 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

Muster Rolls of The Marine Corps

Explore over 1.7 million muster rolls records from the United States Marine Corps spanning the late 1700s up to the end of the nineteenth century. The rolls record the details of men who were serving with the Corps and were chronologically arranged by month and then ordered by detachment or unit. The exception to this is the records pertaining to World War I when they were sorted in two subseries: by posts and stations and by mobile units.

As seen in the column headings on the images of the original records, muster rolls generally include the space to record the following details: name, station, rank, enlistment date, re-enlistment date, desertion or apprehension date, and offence and court-martial sentence.

Buckinghamshire Baptism Index

New FamilySearch Online Indexing Tool is Now Available

A new online indexing tool is now available. Now you can index directly on Familysearch.org.

  • Nothing to download. (Hooray!)
  • Find projects easily.

You can try it today at: https://familysearch.org/indexing.

MyHeritage Record Week: Search 1 Billion Census Records for Free!

MyHeritage recently passed a significant milestone: surpassing 8 billion historical records on SuperSearch. In celebration, the company has announced that they are making all of the major census collections from the U.S., U.K. and Ireland, Canada, and Nordic countries free for everybody, for one week!

Starting on Monday, August 14, until August 20, no Data Subscription will be required to access these documents, and you can search through this treasure trove of census records for free. That’s 94 collections, containing over 1 billion census records! Some of the census records are found exclusively on MyHeritage. This is available to users of MyHeritage as well as people who have never used MyHeritage before.

New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Over 2.9 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:

Billion Graves Cemetery Indexes

We regularly update our collection of cemetery records from BillionGraves. All of the record sets have been added to this time, allowing you to pinpoint your ancestor’s final resting place across a number of countries via GPS-tagged headstones.

This latest update includes:

TheGenealogist releases 650,000 additional Parish Records for Nottinghamshire

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has extended its UK Parish Records collection with a new and exclusive release of 650,000 parish records for Nottinghamshire. These records can be used to find your ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burials in these fully searchable records that cover parishes from this important East Midland county of England. With records that reach back to 1633, this release includes the records of 56 parishes, including:

369,100 individuals in Baptisms, 168,000 individuals in Marriages and 112,800 individuals in Burials

You can use these transcripts to find the names of ancestors, parents’ forenames (in the case of baptisms), father’s occupation (where noted), abode or parish, parish that the event took place in, the date of the event, and in the case of marriage records the bride’s maiden name and the witnesses’ names.

FreeCEN Offers a Free-To-Search Online Database of the 19th Century UK Censuses

The following announcement was written by the folks at FreeCEN:

Did you know- FreeCEN gives free access to census records for England, Scotland & Wales? And we’re launching our new website…

FreeCEN offers a free-to-search online database of the 19th century UK censuses. Transcribed entirely by volunteers, we have more than 32 million individuals available on our website that anyone can search without having to create an account. The new ‘FreeCEN2’ website will launch on Monday 31st July 2017 with all of the records that the current website holds, but with a fresh new look and feel in-line with Free UK Genealogy and FreeREG. We believe that family history records should be free to access for everyone; our new website will offer more features for researchers, and make it easier for them to find what they’re looking for. FreeCEN2 also brings with it a host of improvements for existing and future volunteers, such as a members sign-in area and brand new messaging system. FreeCEN, FreeREG and FreeBMD are projects by Free UK Genealogy, a registered charity that promotes free access to historical records. FreeREG underwent this process in 2015, and FreeBMD is due to begin its renewal later this year.

Carlisle Indian School Cemetery Information is now Available Online

The United States Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania was the flagship Indian boarding school in the United States from 1879 through 1918. According to Wikipedia, “Founded in 1879 by Captain Richard Henry Pratt under authority of the US federal government, Carlisle was the first federally funded off-reservation Indian boarding school. It was founded on the principle that Native Americans were the equals of European-Americans, and that Native American children immersed in mainstream Euro-American culture would learn skills to advance in society.”

Now the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center team has launched an online resource, simply titled Cemetery Information. This resource aims to support the research of descendants, scholars, and others interested in the history of the Carlisle Indian School cemetery by providing easy access to a wide range of primary source documents about the cemetery and the Carlisle Indian School students interred there.

Digital Library of Georgia Adds New and Previously Digitized Newspaper Titles to its Recently Released Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN) Website

From the Blog of the Digital Library of Georgia at: http://blog.dlg.galileo.usg.edu/?p=6768:

In July 2017, the Digital Library of Georgia added both new and previously digitized newspaper titles to its recently released Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN) website. Below is a list of newspapers titles slated to be added to GHN over the next six months.

In the fall of 2017, DLG will add the following newspapers:

​​40,000 ‘Lunatics’ – the Scottish Indexes Genealogy Website Enables People to Discover the True Lives of their Ancestors

The following announcement was written by the folks at Scottish Indexes:

4 August 2017

Glasgow, Scotland – Today Scottish genealogy website www.scottishindexes.com move another step closer to their goal of indexing all historical Scottish mental health records from 1858 to 1915. This release means the index now has 40,000 entries from across Scotland and includes people from every walk of life.

John Rae Thomson – Facts Indicated by Others – “His mother states…that the boys hooted & ran after him in the street crying “daft Jock”. 

These historic mental health records give the story behind the facts. A census record may tell you that your great-grandmother was in an asylum, but not why she was there and that’s what we really want to know. This project, lead by Scottish Indexes, is supported by a growing team of volunteers.

Over 4 Million New & Exclusive United States Marriage Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 4.4 million new records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

United States Marriages

Over 4.3 million new records covering Nevada and California have just been added to our collection of United States Marriage records. Exclusively available at Findmypast, the new additions have never before been released online and mark the latest phase of our efforts to create the single largest online collection of U.S. marriage records in history. Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will contain at least 100 million records and more than 450 million names from 2,800 counties across America.

Each record includes both a transcripts and an images of the original documents that will reveal the date of the marriage, the full names of both the bride and groom, their birthplaces, birth dates, ages, residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names.

Scotland, Linlithgowshire (West Lothian), Poorhouse records 1859-1912

The History Of Westborough – a CrowdSourced Collection of Historical Digital Photographs

The folks at the Westborough (Massachusetts) Public Library had a wonderful idea: let’s ask local residents to bring in their old photographs taken around town over the years and scan them. Then we will add them to Digital Commonwealth to keep these images safe for years to come.

Old Ford Truck – Click on the above image to view a larger version

The project apparently has had great success.

The idea of the program was to bring out the history of Westborough that is hidden away in attics, basements, or in plain sight, and make it available to the world.

Other Westborough Public Library collections available in the Digital Commonwealth include historical town administrative records, documents relating to Westborough’s participation in the American Revolution, records from the Lyman State Reform School, and a World War II Memorial Scrapbook.

Wouldn’t this be a great project for YOUR town’s library or historical society or some other civic-minded group?

Westborough vs Shrewsbury – 1939 – Click on the above image to view a larger version

Announcing the 1775 Dublin Directory Database

The following announcement was written by the Irish Genealogical Research Society:

The Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS) is pleased to announce the launch of another online resource. It is a database index to Wilson’s Dublin Directory, forming part of the 1775 edition of The Treble Almanac, which was published from 1787 to 1837.

As the name suggests, The Treble Almanac is comprised of three separate directories:

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of July 31, 2017

The following announcement was written by the folks at FamilySearch:

SALT LAKE CITY, UT, (1 August 2017), FamilySearch added new historic records this week from the Netherlands, Argentina, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Paraguay, are now available! Search these new free records and new US records from California, Idaho, South Dakota, and Utah. Search one of the new collections by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

MyHeritage Surpasses 8 Billion Records on SuperSearch

How big is the number 8 billion? 8 billion seconds is 2,222,222 hours, 92,592 days, or 253 years. According to recent surveys, the world population will hit 8 billion people in 6 years time, Americans check their phones 8 billion times per day, and across the United States, drivers were stuck in traffic for 8 billion hours in 2015. It’s also the number of historical records that MyHeritage now has available on SuperSearch™!

This is a significant milestone for the company. You can learn more in the MyHeritage Blog at http://bit.ly/2uUSXxD.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Over 2.7 million new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms

Over 556,000 records have been added to our collection of Philadelphia Roman Catholic Baptisms. Each record includes both a transcript and an image of the original document. Records will typically list your ancestor’s name, parent’s names, and residence.

Images may reveal additional information such as place of birth, sponsors, the name of the minister who performed the ceremony and even a notice of marriage. Catholic priests were charged with noting all vital events of their parishioners. If, for instance, a parishioner married outside her home parish, the priest who performed the marriage would contact his/her priest to confirm she was baptised and to share the details of her marriage, hence the marriage notice in the baptism register.

Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish Marriages

TheGenealogist Introduces a New UK Census Substitute for the Year 1921

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has just released a new circa 1921 resource, covering 23 counties, with over one million records. These form part of the Trade, Residential & Telephone record sets on TheGenealogist covering a period currently not served by a census.

The fully transcribed, searchable records released today will allow researchers to:

  • search on forename, surname and profession
  • search by street, town and county
  • look for a business name
  • discover your ancestors’ addresses
  • find professions listed

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast

Somerset Baptisms Index

Our new collection of Somerset Baptisms is an index to more than 2.1 million parish baptisms held at the Somerset Archives. The collection consists of transcripts spanning the years 1501 to 1917 and covers baptisms performed in 496 parishes across the county. The amount of information found in each record will depend on the date and legibility of the original document. Most transcripts will reveal your ancestor’s date of birth, baptism date, where the ceremony was preformed, their religious denomination, parent’s names and father’s occupation.

Somerset Banns Index

Forces War Records Offers a New Collection: Pipers of Scottish and Overseas Regiments 1914-18

The following announcement was written by Forces War Records:

There is a long history of Bagpipes and the British Army, and whilst they weren’t officially recognised until 1854, much of the Army’s battles since the mid-1700s had been fought with piper’s playing. The original purpose of the pipes in battle was to signal tactical movements to the troops during battle.

By the time of WWI it was not only the Scottish, or even British Regiments that had pipe bands, with Commonwealth countries such as Canada, Australia or even South Africa having regiments with their own Pipers. The bag pipes importance in linking the men back to the history of their unit, and of their homeland was not under appreciated. The sound and swirl of the pipes boosted morale amongst the troops and intimidated the enemy. However, unarmed and drawing attention to themselves these extraordinary men were sitting ducks as they went over the top to pipe their men into battle as pipers were always an easy target for the enemy guns.