Online Sites

Huge Genealogical Database of Ukrainians Born in 1650–1920 is Now Online

According to EuroMaiden Press at http://bit.ly/2tbqm9k:

A huge database of people born in the territory of contemporary Ukraine between 1650 and 1920 became available online this week. Its opening crowned the four-year efforts of activists to digitize, systematize, and assemble countless entries from historical documents—but is not the final point of the project.

The database includes 2.56 mn people and is expected to reach 4 to 5 mn in 2019. The access to its contents is and will remain free of charge. The sources of data are manifold: birth registers, fiscal and parish censuses, lists of nobility, voters, the military, and victims of repressions, address directories, and other documents produced under the Tsardom of Muscovy, Russian and Habsburg Empires, Poland and the Soviet Union. A Roman-letter version of the data index is reportedly to be enabled in the coming months.

Presbyterian Church Records Now Available on ScotlandsPeople

According to an announcement on the ScotlandsPeople web site at: http://bit.ly/2seqPml:

“From 26 June 2017, more than 36,000 new presbyterian church records, covering the period 1744 to 1855 have been added to ScotlandsPeople’. The 20,255 births and baptisms (1744-1855), 10,368 marriages and proclamations (1729-1855) and 5,422 death and burial records (1783-1855) may be especially helpful for anyone searching for a person born or baptised, married or died before the introduction of statutory registration in 1855. Further information about our church registers can be found in our record guide.

“Old Parish Registers (OPRs), already available to search through the website, were compiled by ministers of the Church of Scotland, and therefore do not include surviving records of baptisms that were created in other presbyterian denominations that separated themselves from the established church and sometimes also formed further separate denominations.”

You can read the full announcement at: http://bit.ly/2seqPml.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 512,000 records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

Norfolk Marriage Bonds 1557-1915 Browse

Browse 444 volumes of marriage bonds from four ecclesiastical courts in their entirety. This collection contains over 147,000 records kept by the courts of the Archdeaconry of Norfolk, the Archdeaconry of Norwich, the Dean & Chapter of Norwich and the Diocese of Norwich Consistory Court. A marriage bond demonstrates an intention to be married by license.

Most marriage bonds follow the same set format. However, later records, particularly those produced after the 19th century, do tend to add more detail such as age and marital status. The details found in each record may vary depending on the court, the age of the record, and the physical condition of the register although most will include the couples’ name, residences, date of bond and the groom’s signature.

Norfolk Poor Law Union Records 1796-1900 Image Browse

Virginia Newspaper Project Places Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Newspapers Online

From an announcement by the Library of Virginia:

“The Virginia Newspaper Project (VNP) is thrilled to announce an ongoing project to make the Library of Virginia’s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) newspapers available on Virginia Chronicle. The camp newspapers in the LVA’s collection, published from 1934 to 1941 by the young men of the CCC, were mostly distributed in camps throughout the Commonwealth,though a handful are from locales outside Virginia.

“The array of titles vary in sophistication, regularity and skill, but as a whole they offer a vivid picture of camp life during the Depression. Though the physical demands of CCC work could be exhausting, a youthful spirit radiates from the pages of the CCC newspapers: work safety reminders, camp classes and events, health columns, editorials, sports reports, cultural news and illustrations were regular features in many of the papers, but each had its own distinct flavor.

Findmypast Announces Five Days of Free Access to British & Irish Records

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

London, UK, 22nd June 2017

Leading family history website, Findmypast, has just announced that their unrivalled collection of British and Irish records will be free to access for the next five days. Between 04:00 EDT 22nd June and 18:59 EDT, June 26th 2017, more than 1.1 billion records ranging from censuses and parish registers to military service records will be completely free to search and explore.

By providing free access to such a wide array of records, Findmypast aims to encourage genealogists to experience the very best of everything Findmypast has to offer. Researchers will also be provided with daily getting started guides, expert insights and useful how-to blogs over the course of the free access period, as well as a free downloadable eBook entitled “your must have guide to finding your British & Irish ancestors”.

Mylestone’s Heirloom App is Shutting Down

In the February 21, 2017 edition of this newsletter at http://bit.ly/2rAmsCm, I described Mylestone’s Heirloom app as “a new startup that is experimenting with turning our digital footprints into narratives that help us recall highlights from our lives, as well as those of our family members and other loved ones. Mylestone’s mission is to ensure life’s most precious memories are accessible upon command. Utilizing memory artifacts, and a combination of artificial intelligence and external data, the company generates narratives that are available via virtual assistants, such as Alexa.”

Sadly, the service is now shutting down.

The service’s web site at https://mylestone.com/heirloom states:

Findmypast Announces Online Release of over Six Million Ontario Records in First Phase of new Partnership with the Ontario Genealogical Society

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Leading family history website Findmypast has just announced an exciting new partnership with the Ontario Genealogical Society. Announced today at the Society’s 2017 annual conference in Ottawa, the partnership will see Findmypast publish millions of OGS records online in a series of phased releases. The first phase will be launched later this year with the online publication of over six million fascinating Ontario records, including;

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following article was written by Findmypast:

There are over 730,000 records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Rhode Island Births & Baptisms 1600-1935

Rhode Island Births & Baptisms contains over 378,000 records compiled from a variety of sources including family, church and civil records. Each result will provide you with a transcript of key information transcribed from the original source material. The amount of detail will vary from record to record, but most transcripts will reveal your ancestor’s birth date, baptism year, place of birth or baptism and the names of both their parent’s.

Rhode Island Deaths & Burials 1628-1930

TheGenealogist Releases York Colour Tithe Maps and Yorkshire Directories

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

Military review at York racecourse 1866 from TheGenealogist’s Image Archive

TheGenealogist is very pleased to announce the release of the City of York and Ainsty Colour Tithe Maps, plus another significant batch of Yorkshire directories released in time for the Yorkshire Family History Show at York Racecourse.

To coincide with the return of one of the largest family history events in England, at the Knavesmire Exhibition Centre at the York Racecourse on the 24th of June and which is sponsored by TheGenealogist, today sees the release of a set of new records for York.

WW1 Hospital Records Collection on Forces War Records has now Reached 1 Million

The following announcement was written by the folks at Forces War Records in the UK:

Exclusive to Forces War Records – the specialist military genealogy website

These records have been painstakingly transcribed, directly from the original Military Hospital records in the National Archives, so you won’t find these anywhere else online. The original documents were handwritten, often barely readable, but the Forces War Records UK based transcription team of 70+ experts worked for 2 years to decipher it and get the data online, making it easy for this collection to be searched, simply by name.

How Many of You Are There?

The following is for U.S. residents only:

There are 325,060,629 people in the U.S.

How many have your name?

To find out, go to http://HowManyOfMe.com and enter your own name.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Over 10.1 million new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Canada Census 1881

The Canada Census of 1881 records the details of over 4.2 million Canadians. In 1881, Canada consisted of British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. The census began on 4 April 1881 and covered 192 districts broken up into 2,139 sub-districts. Census districts and sub-districts were composed of cities, towns, townships, Indian reserves, and less-defined areas. Areas that were less defined posed a particular challenge to enumerators and resulted in individuals being missed. This was particularly the case for Aboriginal people living in districts 187 (New Westminster, British Columbia) and 192 (Northwest Territories).

MyHeritage Adds Seven New Online Dutch Collections

An article in the MyHeritage Blog states:

“We’re happy to announce the publication on MyHeritage Super Search of seven large and significant historical record collections from the Netherlands. These new collections, totaling over 116 million records, cover about five centuries, and fascinating periods in Dutch history. During this time, the Netherlands’ population grew from an estimated 1 million people to over 4.5 million inhabitants.

Ancestry.com Migrates Its Entire Server Infrastructure to the Cloud

I have written often about the advantages and the disadvantages of storing your data, especially backup copies, in the cloud. Mostly, it is an efficient and effective method of keeping your information safe. A lot of industry leaders agree. Now Ancestry.com’s entire data center has been moved to cloud computing.

A few years ago, I visited Ancestry.com’s data center on two different occasions. While impressive, it was a typical data center. (I have been inside hundreds of data centers over the years.) One major disaster, such as a fire or earthquake, could have left the company without a lot of data processing capabilities. To be sure, Ancestry.com maintains almost constant backups of their data. However, building a new data center after a disaster, probably in a new location, and restoring the backups would have required months, possibly years.

New Indexing Projects on FamilySearch: June 2017

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 5 June 2017–FamilySearch has published its June 2017 list of historic record collections available for indexing (see table below). If you have not contributed as a volunteer online indexer yet, these new projects might provide the perfect opportunity! This month’s indexing projects might also hold “that record” you need to break down another family history brick wall. There are new projects for Australia, Colombia, Ecuador, France, Italy, Peru, and the US. Help us unlock them through indexing. The indexing done by generous online volunteers is what makes historical records easily searchable online for free at FamilySearch. Click on a project of personal interest from the collections list below to see how you can help connect families to their ancestors.

Over 5 Million Additional United States, WWI Draft Registration Cards Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Over 5.1 million new records have been added to our collection of United States WWI draft registration cards. This final update completes this fascinating collection, which now totals more than 25 million records.

The draft was authorized for the purpose of raising a national army in light of the United States’ entry into World War I. When, on April 6, 1917, the United States officially declared war on Germany, the US Army was far too small to effectively fight an overseas war. In response, the Selective Service Act was passed enabling men to be selected, trained and drafted into military service, as necessary. Following the Act’s passage on May 18th 1917, more than 24 million Americans (nearly 98% of the male population under the age of 46) registered for the draft, meaning that this collection records nearly half the male population at that time.

Idaho State Archives to Digitize 27,000 Records

The Idaho State Archives is making more than 27,000 records available to the public by digitizing the documents in collaboration with http://Ancestry.com.

The Idaho Press Tribune at http://bit.ly/2rVZZ6h reports that birth, death, prison and other records are currently being scanned – a process expected to be completed in the next six months. The records will then be accessible through the Ancestry Institution online database.

Recently Launched Indexing Projects On FamilySearch: May 2017

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has published its May 2017 list of historic record collections available for indexing (see table below). Indexing by generous volunteers is what makes historical records easily searchable online for free at FamilySearch. Click on a project of personal interest from the collections list below to help connect families to their ancestors.

Maine’s WPA Cemetery Plans Are Now Online

Emily Schroeder, the genealogy specialist at Maine State Library, has published an article in her blog that describes a new resource for anyone with Maine ancestry. (Hey! That’s me!) Many Maine cemeteries have plans originally created courtesy of the Works Progress Administration, which reside at the Maine State Archives. Thanks to that staff and the folks who work on Digital Maine, all 543 of those images may now be seen at the touch of a button or two!

You can read more in Emily Schroeder’s blog at: http://bit.ly/2qkyNy8.

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps Now Online

Many experienced genealogists can tell you that using the Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps is a great way to learn more about the lives of your U.S. ancestors, especially if they owned their own homes or rented homes or their places of business.

The Library of Congress has placed online nearly 25,000 Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, which depict the structure and use of buildings in U.S. cities and towns. Maps will be added monthly until 2020, for a total of approximately 500,000.

The online collection now features maps published prior to 1900. The states available include Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin and Wyoming. Alaska is also online, with maps published through the early 1960s. By 2020, all the states will be online, showing maps from the late 1880s through the early 1960s.