Online Sites

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

findmypast_logoOver 31 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms

Discover your Catholic ancestors from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in this first record release from an agreement we’ve made with the Roman Catholic Church to digitise their unique records for the first time ever. These baptism records list your ancestor’s name, their parent’s names, and their residence at the time.

Additional information that you may find from the images include place of birth, sponsors, minister who performed the ceremony, and notice of marriage. Catholic priests were charged with noting all vital events of their parishioners. If, for instance, a parishioner married outside her home parish, the priest who performed the marriage would contact her priest to confirm she was baptised and to share the details of her marriage, hence the marriage notice in the baptism register.

Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish Marriages

Findmypast launches Catholic Heritage Archive

Findmypast Has announced immediate availability of millions of exclusive Catholic records published online with more coming soon. The records are from thre United States, Britain and Ireland. The company also announced:

  • Findmypast also announces new additions to the ambitious United States Marriages project
  • Release marks significant expansion of Findmypast’s US data collection

catholicheritagearchive

Thursday 9th February 2017

Leading family history website, Findmypast, today announced the creation of the Roman Catholic Heritage Archive, a ground breaking initiative that aims to digitize the historic records of the Catholic Church in the United States, Britain and Ireland.

Findmypast is today releasing over 3 million exclusive records including sacramental registers for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia from 1757 to 1916 as well as for the British Archdioceses of Westminster and Birmingham from 1657 onwards. This builds on last year’s publication of more than 10 million Irish Catholic parish registers.

Twile is now Completely Free for Everybody

This announcement should please a lot of people! The following was written by the folks at Twile:

Doncaster: 7th February 2017

Family history timeline Twile announces its service is now free for all users.

The UK based company, who will be exhibiting at RootsTech in Salt Lake City this week, have revised their subscription in order to fully embrace their mission of making family history more engaging for the whole family.

The totally free service now allows all Twile users to:

  • Build their family tree
  • Share and collaborate with family
  • Add unlimited milestones and photos
  • Import trees and memories from FamilySearch
  • Import and merge multiple GEDCOM files

TheGenealogist Launches over 282,000 Parish Records, plus 43,000 New War Memorial Records

The following announcement was written by the folks at The Genealogist:

The Genealogist has added to the millions of its UK Parish Records collection with over 282,000 new records from Essex, Cumberland and Norfolk making it easier to find your ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burials in these fully searchable records covering ancient parishes. Some of the records go back as far as 1672.

thegenealogist_war_memorialThe new release of War Memorial records means there are now over 350,000 searchable records. This latest release includes war memorials from London, along with further English counties including Cumbria, Berkshire, Warwickshire and Suffolk. The collection also stretches across the globe to encompass new War Memorials situated in Perth, Australia and the Province of Saskatchewan in Canada. Fully searchable by name, researchers can read transcriptions and see images of the dedications that commemorate soldiers who have fallen in the Boer War, WW1 and various other conflicts.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Over 1.1 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Australia Electoral Rolls

findmypast_logoOver 1 million new records have been added to our collection of Australian Electoral Rolls. The new additions cover Queensland and Tasmania and will allow you to discover where your ancestor lived and whether they were eligible to vote.

We have also made vast improvements to our Australian Electoral Rolls search. Previously the Rolls existed as simple PDF searches that could only be accessed separately, state by state. We have now fully transcribed these collections and placed them into one central collection. This makes searching for your Australian ancestors easier than ever before as you can now search across all 12.6 million of these valuable census substitutes at once. The entire collection covers New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, the Northern Territory and Western Australia and spans the years 1860 to 1959.

Early emigration from Britain 1636-1815

The Genealogy Library Inside Your Computer: How to Increase Your Personal Genealogy Library without Additional Bookshelves

old_books_and_new_ebooksThousands of genealogy books are available to you right now. You can search for them and, if you find some that look interesting, you can be reading them within minutes. There is no waiting for the post office to deliver them. Best of all is the price: most of them are available free of charge!

NOTE: a few of the ebooks are only available on CD-ROM which obviously does involve a postal delay and normally costs some money..

As you may have guessed, these are out-of-copyright books printed prior to 1923 plus a handful of later books. Luckily, there were a lot of genealogy books published in those days. After all, the records weren’t as old back then!

In addition, I will list sources for many newer genealogy books that are for sale at modest prices.

Perhaps to Best Place to Start Your Search for Online Genealogy eBooks

Twile Launches Free Family Infographic

The following announcement was written by Twile:

Doncaster: 2nd February 2017

Family history timeline Twile have today released a new infographic feature, designed to help family historians share their research and engage younger generations.

With over 60% of family historians concerned that their findings will be lost or forgotten and 74% doubtful if anyone will continue their family history research*, Twile have come up a quick and interesting way of getting non-genealogists interested in their ancestry.

Twile’s new personalised family infographic is free and available to everyone – whether currently using Twile or not – at http://www.twile.com/numbers. Users simply import their FamilySearch tree or upload a GEDCOM and their infographic is automatically created.

Users will be able to see statistics such as the average number of children per family, the most common surnames, the ratio of men to women and the average age of marriage.

MyHeritage Introduces New Discoveries Pages

MyHeritage (the sponsor of this newsletter) has just introduced a new improvement called Discoveries Pages. These pages provide a unified experience for all matches, organizing them into two main pages:

  • Matches by People
  • Matches by Source

discoveries-pages

The new pages allow you to look at all matches that were found for a particular individual in your family tree, or all matches found in a particular collection of historical records or matching family tree. Whatever you choose to use, the new pages combine Smart Matches (matches with trees) and Record Matches (matches with records) into the same unified and consistent interface.

Auschwitz Death Camp: Poland Puts Database of Prison Guards Online

The names of Nazi SS commanders and guards at the Auschwitz death camp in German-occupied Poland have been put online by the country’s Institute of National Remembrance (INR). It has been hailed as the most comprehensive list to date.

These children were photographed by a Red Army soldier on the day the camp was liberated

These children were photographed by a Red Army soldier on the day the camp was liberated

About 9,000 names – nearly all German – are on the Auschwitz garrison list, some with photographs attached.

Over 3 million Victoria Petty Sessions Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

findmypast_logoOver 4.5 million new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday Including;

Victoria Petty Sessions Registers

Over 3 million Victoria Petty Sessions records have just been releases in association with Public Records Office Victoria to coincide with Australia Day 2017. This fascinating collection includes both transcripts and scanned colour images of original court registers that will allow you to discover whether any of your Australian ancestors had a brush with the law.

Covering both civil and minor criminal cases, the Court of Petty Sessions’ brief was wide, making these records a powerful resource for those with Australian ancestors. Your ancestors may appear as a witness, defendant, complainant or even as a Justice of the Peace. Cases ranged from merchants who had not paid duty on their goods, to workers suing for unpaid wages. Debts were collected and disputes settled. Public drunkenness was a common offence, as was assault and general rowdiness.

ArkivDigital to Add Millions of Aerial Photographs from all over Sweden

ArkivDigital has acquired several million aerial photos from Svenska Aero-Bilder AB. These will now be digitized and added to ArkivDigital’s online archive. These images will complement the church books, estate inventories, military documents, court books and other archival records that currently exist in ArkivDigital.

“Our goal is to continually add new material and create new services for our customers to help them in their research. These images will complement other records in our archives such as the images of the church records. Through this acquisition, we will have millions of aerial photographs of farms, cottages, villas, petrol stations and much more from the 1950’s to the present day from all over Sweden,” said the company’s CEO, Mikael Karlsson.

You can learn more at https://goo.gl/C7EgYG.

668,000 Pittsburgh, PA Cemetery Records Now Online

Including neighboring communities throughout the Allegheny County area.

San Diego, CA, January 21, 2017– Interment.net, an online cemetery records archive serving genealogists since 1997, recently added over 668,000 records from 29 cemeteries located in the greater Pittsburgh, PA area. These records have dates of death from the 1750s to present day.

The public is welcome to browse them by visiting: http://www.interment.net/us/pa/allegheny.htm

These records cover the cemeteries of the Pittsburgh Catholic Diocese, the National Cemetery of the Alleghenies, the African American Military Cemetery, Allegheny Cemetery, Homewood Cemetery, and several others in the communities of McKeesport, Versailles, Bridgeville, Elizabeth, and Bethel Park.

An Online Database: New York Philharmonic Subscribers, 1883-1907

logo-nyphilGenealogy information is wherever you find it! One unusual resource is a database of subscribers to the New York Philharmonic up to about 1953. It is indexed and linked to digital images of the subscription books. The books contain names and home address of concert goers. This may be a great resource for someone with ancestors in New York City.

You can access the list of New York Philharmonic Subscribers, 1883-1907 at: http://archives.nyphil.org/index.php/subscribers.

My thanks to newsletter reader Mike Provard for telling me about this online resource.

How to Opt Out of the Most Popular People Search Sites

I have written recently about Family Tree Now and Radaris.com, two web sites that claim to be genealogy services. In reality, these two sites and many others simply gather public domain information about you and everyone else, then sell your personal information to anyone willing to pay for it. Addresses, family members, and known associates are available for anyone to find.

You can demand these sites remove your personal information from their databases, however, by “opting out.” Writing in the LifeHacker web site, Patric Allan describes how to “opt out” from Family Tree Now, Whitepages, Spokeo, and other popular free people search engines. You can find his article at: https://goo.gl/ij7hhL.

Still Another So-Called Family Tree Website Reveals Your Personal Address and Family Information

I wrote recently (at https://goo.gl/C6p932) about a new web site that claims to be a family history and genealogy service but seems to be primarily a site that publishes personal information about individuals. That web site is not alone. Still another web site has now appeared with a very similar offering. In fact, there are dozens of such web sites on the Internet that make money by selling your personal information and mine.

radaris_logoRadaris.com claims to be “a comprehensive public records search engine for information about people, properties, businesses and professionals.” The company’s press release states, “Radaris customers can start to build their family tree now without unnecessary time or expense.”

However, there appears to be little information about ancestors or family history on the site. Instead, Radaris appears to be a search engine that scours various public records found on multiple sources, gathering information about the people and places in our lives, and using it to create information to be sold to anyone who wishes it.

The site’s home page states:

Findmypast Release New Leicestershire Collection

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

findmypast_logoA ‘gypsy king’, the ‘peasant poet’, the fattest man in England, and death by lioness: five centuries of life and death in historic Leicestershire revealed online for the first time

  • Findmypast launch first phase of new landmark collection
  • Over 3.5 million records dating back to the reign of Henry VII now available online

Leading UK family history website findmypast.co.uk has today, 23rd January 2016, published online for the first time more than 3.5 million historic records in partnership with Leicestershire county council’s Record Office for Leicestershire, Leicester and Rutland.

The publication marks the first phase of Findmypast’s new Leicestershire, Leicester & Rutland collection, a rich archive spanning the years 1490 to 1991 comprising beautifully scanned images of original handwritten documents. When complete, the collection will be the largest online repository of Leicestershire family history records in the word.

There is a variety of fascinating documents, including parish records of baptisms, marriages and burials, wills and probate records dating back to 1490, and millions of electoral registers spanning the years 1710 to 1974.

Thinking Across Time: Researching USCIS Records

The US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will present an online webinar on Tuesday, January 24, 2017, at 1 p.m. Eastern time. The speaker will be historical records expert Marian L. Smith who will showcase late 19th and 20th century US immigration and nationality records. She will also discuss how using a timeline can help one predict what immigration and naturalization records may exist for a given immigrant, and how to request records from USCIS.

uscis

This webinar will continue the “T-458 Revisited” series with focus on INS immigration correspondence files at the National Archives in Washington, DC. This session will expand upon guidance already found on the USCIS website with additional examples and advice.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

findmypast_logoOver 1.5 million new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Yorkshire & Derbyshire Methodist Baptisms

Yorkshire & Derbyshire Methodist Baptisms contains over 42,000 records that will allow you to see if your ancestor was baptised in a Methodist Church between 1795 and 1997. The collection covers the densely populated Sheffield district. Sheffield is located in South Yorkshire, traditionally part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, and many of its suburbs stretch into Derbyshire.

Each record will provide you with a transcript created from original church records by the Sheffield & District Family History Society. The details in each record will vary, but most will include your ancestor’s name, birth year, baptism date, denomination, chapel, place, parent’s name and county.

Yorkshire & Derbyshire Methodist Marriages

Findmypast Announce Four Days of Free Access to Over 1.9 Billion Records

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

  • Findmypast_logoFindmypast makes all birth, marriage, death & census records free to search and explore from Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th January 2017
  • Free access covers all records hinted against in Findmypast’s family tree builder
  • This includes 583 million UK BMDs, the largest collection available online including over 80 million exclusive parish records you won’t find anywhere else, over 10 million Irish Catholic Parish registers and over 140 million United States Marriages
  • Family historians will be supported with expert insights and how to guides

London, UK. 12th January, 2016

Family Tree Website Reveals Personal Address, Family Information

Snopes.com reported on a family tree website that is causing a lot of alarm to the general public as it reveals a lot of personal information.

FamilyTreeNow.com claims to be a family history and genealogy web site but seems to be primarily a site that publishes public information about individuals. In fact, there are a number of other web sites that do the same (Spokeo, Intellius, BeenVerified.com and perhaps a dozen or so others) for a fee but FamilyTreeNow.com provides basic information free of charge.

The website allows anyone to enter a person’s name and then displays whatever personal information the web site knows about people of that name. In many cases, results show personal information along with the names, ages and addresses of people they are related to.