Preservation

Digital Maine Transcription Project

The Digital Maine Transcription Project (DMTP) encourages “crowdsourcing.” That is, you or anyone else with an interest can help make significant Maine documents accessible online so that others may benefit.

According to the DMTP web site at http://www.digitalmaine.net/projects/about:

DMTP started in 2016 as a collaborative project of the Maine State Archives and Maine State Library. The decision was made to open up access to as many digital images of original documents as possible, but staff lacked time to transcribe them.

Watch the British Library Digitize One of the World’s Largest Books

Most experienced genealogists are familiar with over-sized books. Vital records, deeds, maps, and more are often published on larger-than-normal pages. Digitizing those books can be a challenge although several companies have already done a great job at digitization.

However, how do you digitize a book that is nearly six feet by seven and a half feet when open? It is so big that it even has wheels fixed onto it to make it easier to move around!

How to Manage Your Family’s Digital Assets

I am proud to announce that an article I wrote is now available on FamilySearch.orgHow to Manage Your Family’s Digital Assets. The article begins:

“In our digitally integrated lives, we create and share most of our pictures and home videos with snazzy digital cameras, incredible smart phones, or other easily portable devices. We download music purchases and perhaps even keep only digital receipts of our purchases through photos or emails. Someone said, “That [choose your device of choice] is so versatile that it can take pictures, chop celery, and keep us in touch with relatives as far away as Samoa.”

“Now that we have all these digital devices, have we figured out what to do with the fruits of those devices—the mounds of digital files and sources we amass daily, weekly, monthly, yearly? What do we do with all our personal digital content that makes up our digital lives?”

You can read the entire article at: http://media.familysearch.org/how-to-manage-your-familys-digital-assets/.

South Dakota State Historical Society to Digitize more Historical Newspapers

The South Dakota State Historical Society has announced that more historical newspapers will be digitized as part of a federal grant.

The following is the announcement from the South Dakota State Historical Society:

Newspaper digitization advisory board selects newspapers to digitize for federal grant

PIERRE, S.D. – The South Dakota State Historical Society has announced that more historical newspapers will be digitized as part of a federal grant.

In September the State Historical Society-Archives was awarded a second round of grant funding in the amount of $240,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to continue digitizing historical newspapers.

The Good Cemeterian

Andrew Lumish spends his free time in an unlikely place: cemeteries. On his weekly day off, he spends about ten hours using his cleaning skills to restore veterans’ tombstones around Tampa, Florida. To honor veterans for serving their country, Lumish taught himself how to properly clean graves. He found out the system the government uses for national cemeteries—including Arlington—and got to work.

Lumish tries to post four new pictures a week on his Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/TheGoodCemeterian/.

An Attempt to Save South Carolina’s Historical Documents is Destroying Them

This should be a lesson to all genealogists, archivists, historians, and to anyone with old documents or pictures they would like to preserve: Don’t laminate them!

Back in the 1950s, many people thought that laminating something was a method of preserving it. Even some archivists recommended laminating old documents. As the years went by, these people learned the folly of their recommendations. Laminating something actually hastens its deterioration.

For 20 years, beginning in the 1950s, the state of South Carolina laminated documents to protect them from aging. However, a chemical reaction caused the documents to deteriorate faster than they would have had they been left unlaminated. The natural acids from the paper mix with the degrading laminate to create a noxious vinegar. Each passing year will further degrade the document until it’s gone.

Families Torn Apart by Slavery Sought Lost Loved Ones in Newly Archived Ads

The ads are gut-wrenching, such as, “Where is John Person?”

“Ten years have gone by since his mother, Hannah Cole, last saw him. The pain of his disappearance, the mystery of his whereabouts, and the aching question of whether he is alive or dead have driven her to take out an advertisement in the Christian Recorder, seeking an answer.

hannahcolead

“This is the only child I have,” it reads, “and I desire to find him much.”

University of Delaware is Digitizing Thousands of Delaware Newspapers

The Delaware project began in 2015 with a mission to digitize 100,000 pages of newspaper previously only available on microfilm. An effort launched in the 1980s preserved many of the newspapers on reels of microfilm that can now be converted to digital form.

Delaware has approximately 30,000 pages available to researchers online with 70,000 more to be added by the end of 2017, Olney-Zide said. All newspapers included are in the public domain and were printed between 1690 and 1922, which means they are no longer copyrighted.

State Historical Society of Iowa to Digitally Preserve more than 12 Million Pages of Newspapers, Some as Old as the 1830s

The following announcement was written by the Advantage Companies, a Cedar Rapids business with a division dedicated to the preservation and digital access of historical newspapers:

DES MOINES – The process to save the first draft of Iowa history just got a lot smoother.

The State Historical Society of Iowa today unveiled a sweeping new plan to preserve more than 12 million pages of newspapers in its collection, giving Iowans greater access to more than 300 titles dating to the state’s pioneer days in the 1830s.

Under the authority of the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, the State Historical Society has signed a 5-year contract to loan the newspapers to the Advantage Companies, a Cedar Rapids business with a division dedicated to the preservation and digital access of historical newspapers. Advantage will take on the ambitious new project at no cost to the state, and ownership of the physical newspapers will remain with the State Historical Society.

Navajo Nation Library To Digitize 1960s Oral History Archive

The Navajo Nation Library (NNL) is working to secure the funding necessary to digitize and catalog thousands of hours of stories, songs, and oral histories of the Navajo people, originally recorded in the 1960s by the Navajo Culture Center of the Office of Navajo Economic Opportunity (ONEO).

The tapes hold personal accounts by Navajos of their daily lives in the rural towns of the Navajo Nation, as well as songs, legends, stories, and religious music, including a recording of the sacred nine-night ceremony.

The 300 reel-to-reel tapes are extremely fragile, caused by aging. The digitization process needs to happen as soon as possible, says NNL program supervisor Irving Nelson, as it is only a matter of time until they deteriorate to the point where they can’t be transferred to another medium.

Complaints Filed After Logging Operations Damages Historic Illinois Cemetery

Local genealogists and archaeologists are concerned about logging damage in an historic black cemetery between Millstadt and Centreville, Illinois, that has graves from the 1800s and early 1900s, including those of Civil War soldiers. They’ve complained to local authorities about logging trucks driving through the hilly, overgrown property, known as St. George Cemetery, and knocking over, breaking or moving headstones, some a century or more old.

“It’s history, and it’s being destroyed, and nobody seems to care,” said cemetery researcher Judy Jennings, of O’Fallon, a member of the St. Clair County Genealogical Society.

Incubation Chambers Help Libraries Save Old Newspapers

The University of Connecticut is undergoing a restoration project to revive 19th century Chilean newspapers documenting the years leading up to the war between Chile and an allied Peru and Bolivia. Over the centuries, the newspaper has become brittle and awkwardly creased in ways that make it difficult to read, even tearing when you try to turn the page. The University is using a humidification chamber that relaxes the pages, allowing for a series of follow-up techniques to restore and eventually digitize the print. The process lasts about 15 minutes.

You can read more about the process and view several pictures of the humidification chamber in operation in an article by Sidney Fussell in the Gizmodo web site at: https://goo.gl/zC610p as well as in the video below:

South Carolina Archivists Seek $200,000 to Preserve Copies of Constitutions

South Carolina state archivists are seeking $200,000 to fight the effects of old conservation techniques that threaten South Carolina’s copies of seven constitutions dating to 1776. The copies are in various states of disrepair. Some appear to be in good condition but were conserved using a 1940s process that is slowly degrading the documents housed in the temperature-controlled archives.

The cellulose acetate lamination applied in the 1940s needs to be removed before it breaks down into acetic acid, said Eric Emerson, director of the S.C. Department of Archives and History. In fact, the preservation effort of the 1940s is actually accelerating the deterioration, not preserving the documents.

You can read the details in an article by Gavin Jackson in the Post and Courier at: https://goo.gl/wsn7rx.

Suggestion: The Time to Digitize Historic Items is NOW

WARNING: This article contains personal opinions.

building-fireIt seems that every two or three months, I publish sad news about important records and artifacts being lost forever. Sometimes fires damage or destroy library or archive buildings and all the contents: including records, books, family histories, cemetery records, plat maps, military uniforms, and more. In other articles, I have written about similar losses caused by floods, hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, burst water pipes, leaky roofs, and even about buildings collapsing. Genealogists, historians, art lovers, and others often lose irreplaceable items.

With a little bit of planning, the worst of these losses can be averted or at least minimized.

How NOT to Clean a Tombstone for Photography!

Take a look at the picture below. Do you see something wrong with it? Almost every genealogist will cringe when viewing a picture like this one from FindAGrave.com. Someone apparently used a wire brush to make the engravings on the tombstone easier to read. AAARRRGGGGHHH!

sarah_spraker_tombstone

The above photo may be seen at http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=5240794&PIpi=42662882.

Using a wire brush on a tombstone or any other stone memorial causes irreparable damage! In fact, the damage is so severe that most states in the USA and also governments in many other countries have laws prohibiting such actions. Under the laws of many states, unauthorized tampering with or damaging gravestones is a felony.

Expansion of Washington State Library’s Online Newspaper Collection

Nearly 50,000 newly digitized pages from historic newspapers based in Centralia, Eatonville, Tacoma and Spokane are being added to the Washington State Library’s online newspaper collection this year.

eatonvilledispatch

The latest titles are the Centralia Daily Hub (1914-16), The Eatonville Dispatch (1916-61) and Den Danske Kronike (1916-17), a Danish-English publication based in Spokane. The Centralia and Eatonville papers were added this month. Den Danske Kronike was added last summer, along with the Tacoma Evening Telegraph (1886-87).

Civil War documents Tucked Away in Shoeboxes Across Virginia have been Digitized and Placed Online

The Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission funded the State Library to send two archivists around the state with digital scanners, making high-resolution copies of documents brought by residents. They roamed Virginia between 2010 and 2015. The archivists traveled the state in an “Antiques Roadshow” style campaign to unearth the past. Organizers had thought the effort might produce a few hundred new items. They were a little off. It flushed out more than 33,000 pages of letters, diaries, documents and photographs that the library scanned and has made available for study online. The originals were all returned to the owners.

johnwinnmoseley_letter

Best of all, the documents are available online and can be searched at http://www.virginiamemory.com/collections/cw150.

My thanks to the several newsletter readers who sent me links to this article.

Newberry Library Acquires Collection of 2.5 Million Postcards

illinois_postcardThrough an agreement with the Lake County Forest Preserves District, the Newberry Library in Chicago will become the new home of the Curt Teich Postcard Archives Collection, widely regarded as the largest public collection of postcards and related materials in the United States.

The postcards, about 2.5 million in number, feature a range of subjects and genres: rural vistas and urban skylines, tourist attractions and emergent industries, domestic scenes and global conflicts. Standing at the intersection of American commerce and visual culture, they demonstrate the country’s evolving conception of itself—and its place in the world—during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Preserve Your… — Bookmarks (2016 edition)

The Library of Congress Preservation Directorate has developed the bookmarks below to celebrate Preservation Week, an initiative launched by the Library of Congress, Institute of Library and Museum Services, American Library Association, American Institute for Conservation, Society of American Archivists, and Heritage Preservation to highlight what we can do, individually and together, to preserve our personal and shared collections. The original versions of these bookmarks (2009, 2011) were made possible in part by funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Afghan Officials Receive Digitized Cultural Treasures

Here is another strong argument why libraries, archives, and museums should make digital copies of everything in their collections and store the copies off-site. During recent warfare and insurrections, tens of thousands of historical items were stolen and most apparently are lost forever. Now more than 163,000 digital pages of documents are being returned to the owners of the originals.

A digital copy is never as good as the original but it is a lot better than staring at an empty space where the original was once housed!

The following announcement was written by the Library of Congress:

Library of Congress, Carnegie Corporation provide Cultural, Historical Materials

The Library of Congress has completed a three-year project, financed by Carnegie Corporation of New York, to digitize holdings of the Library of Congress relating to the culture and history of Afghanistan, for use by that nation’s cultural and educational institutions.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, joined by Carnegie Corporation of New York President Vartan Gregorian, presented hard drives containing more than 163,000 pages of documents to the Afghan Minister of Information and Culture, Abdul Bari Jahani, and to Abdul Wahid Wafa, Executive Director of the Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University.